Center Newsletters

February 2017 CAGR Newsletter

Tue, 02/21/2017 - 11:09am -- webmaster

February was a lively month at the Center as our research fellows continued their work, we held a public lecture, and continued our outreach on the USC campus and beyond.

The Center’s inaugural Katz Research Fellow in Genocide Studies, Teresa Walch (PhD Candidate at UC San Diego), concluded her stay by giving a compelling public lecture on the exclusion of German Jews from their own homeland during the Holocaust. The Center’s Greenberg Research Fellow, Katja Schatte (PhD Candidate at University of Washington), began her residency at the Center this month. While at the Center she will be watching testimony related to her dissertation project, which focuses on the relationship between second and third generations of East German Jews. In particular, she addresses scholarly and community debates about contemporary and East German Jewish identity, Holocaust memory, and the effects of trauma and exile across generations.

Additionally, the Center hosted a lecture by Lee Ann Fujii on violent displays and resistance, with examples drawn from Bosnia, Croatia, and the Jim Crow era in the U.S. (Read more about this month’s events and the work of our fellows below.)

This month, Center staff assisted USC faculty members from the departments of Psychology, Anthropology, Political Science, and History to introduce their undergraduate students to the Visual History Archive (VHA). Center staff also organized workshops that will be held on the East Coast next month, which will be led by Center staff, on the value and use of the VHA in research and
teaching.

As we move into March, we are eagerly anticipating Katja Schatte’s upcoming lecture and the arrival of the 2016-2017 Center Research Fellow, Alexander Korb, University of Leicester, United Kingdom.

Sincerely,

Wolf Gruner

Founding Director of the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research
Professor of History and Shapell-Guerin Chair in Jewish Studies

Events

“Excluding Jews from their Homeland and Erasing ‘Jewish Spaces’ in Nazi Germany"

A Lecture by Teresa Walch, Inaugural Katz Research Fellow

Before ending her residency Teresa Walch, the 2016-2017 Inaugural Robert J. Katz Research Fellow in Genocide Studies, gave a lecture on the calculated and gradual exclusion of Jews from public spaces and ultimately from their own homes that began in the 1930s. This research is part of her wider dissertation research on the crucial role space played in the Nazis’ rise to and consolidation of power as Nazis sought to redesign space to fit their ideological visions.

Watch the lecture and read a more detailed summary of her talk here

“Everyday Forms of Resistance: Evidence From the Killing Fields of Bosnia, Rwanda, and the United States"

A Lecture by Lee Ann Fujii, University of Toronto

Professor Lee Ann Fujii visited the Center this month and gave a public lecture about her new book and acts of resistance related to her research. In her lecture, she drew on multiple disciplines, literatures, and episodes of violence and genocide to analyze the execution of individuals in performative ways, in front of crowds, with other kinds of violence and humiliation displayed besides only the killing. She offered a new analytic category to encompass these kinds of acts – violent display.

Read a more detailed summary here

Research

Katja Schatte, Greenberg Research Fellow 2016-2017

Katja Schatte, PhD candidate in East German Jewish History at the University of Washington and recipient of the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research’s Margee and Douglas Greenberg Research Fellowship, arrived to begin her month-long residency at the Center. During her residency, she is viewing and analyzing testimonies relevant to her dissertation in progress, entitled “’Don’t We All Have a Responsibility in This World?’ Jewish Women’s Lives and Identities in East Berlin, 1945-1990”. Her research focuses on the experiences of female Holocaust survivors, memory, postmemory and transgenerational trauma. The testimonies in the VHA will complement her own interviews conducted with Jewish women who were raised in East Germany after World War II.

Read more about Katja here and watch an interview with her here

Shira Klein, International Teaching Fellow 2016-2017

Shira Klein, assistant professor of History at Chapman University, is the 2016-2017 International Teaching Fellow. She earned the fellowship by proposing to integrate testimonies from the Visual History Archive into two classes she teaches at Chapman University: an existing undergraduate course “Jewish Life from Napoleon to Hitler” and a new graduate course “Jewish Migration and War.” While she has had students watch testimonies in the Visual History Archive in her undergraduate course for the last five years, she will now be assigning them research projects centered on the VHA.

Professor Klein recently visited the Center to meet and collaborate with staff. During the in-depth consultation on her visit, she made a discovery that she said will vastly improve their experience searching the archive: how to best navigate and use the Visual History Archive’s Index Search to help students discover topics that interest them. Klein also found testimonies that will inform her own research about Italian Jews during the Holocaust.

As part of her research, Klein seeks to dispel the popular myth that Italians were benevolent toward their Jewish neighbors. Klein argues, along with other scholars, that Italians did indeed cooperate with the Nazis to help round up Jews – and she has found testimonies in the Visual History Archive that support her theory.

Read more about Shira Klein here

Applications for the 2017-2018 International Teaching Fellow are currently being accepted. For more information, click here.

Interdisciplinary Research Week

Each year, the Center hosts a team of scholars from different disciplines and different universities for one week to brainstorm a project that uses the testimonies from the Visual History Archive. This opportunity is awarded to an interdisciplinary group
of scholars preferably from different countries who wish to use the Visual History Archive as a central aspect of an innovative research project in the field of genocide studies. The next recipients of the annual Interdisciplinary Research Week fellowship have been selected. The team brings a a group of seven scholars from four Latin American countries to Los Angeles that will develop a project examining testimonies of Holocaust survivors who settled in Mexico, Argentina, Chile and Colombia. They plan to use a variety of research methods to comb through the 54,000 testimonies in the VHA, including text mining, mapping trajectories of survival, and using indexing terms to gather a representative sample of the diversity of the survivors’ experiences. They are interested not only in what the survivors say, but also in how they tell their stories, including what is difficult for them to talk about, what they say spontaneously, and how they respond to the interviewers.

Read more about their project here.

Visual History Archive Informs Scholarly Books and Articles in 2016

To learn more about some of the scholarship informed by the Visual History Archive in 2016, click here.

Outreach

During the month of February, Center staff had the opportunity to provide introductions to the Visual History Archive and to assist USC faculty from Psychology, Anthropology, Political Science, and History in incorporating testimonies from the VHA into their courses. The topics for these classes were: Psychological Adjustment Among Survivors of Genocide; Cultures of Genocide; Human Rights; and Race and Religious Riots in Modern World History. Students received an introduction to the history of the Shoah Foundation, as well as demonstrations on how to search the Visual History Archive for their class or student research projects. The Center also organized travel for next month to Keene State, Northeastern, and the University of Pennsylvania. Center staff will provide workshops to faculty, students, and staff at these universities about the uses of the VHA for teaching and research.

Upcoming Events

March 7, 2017

Katja Schatte’s lecture: “Between Scholarship and Community Engagement: Exploring Pre- and Post-Reunification Jewish Life in East Berlin”

March 8, 2017

Bogdan’s Journey (Film Screening), 7:00pm, Laemmle Music Hall 3

April 4, 2017

Save the date for an event featuring the 2016 Center’s USC Summer research fellows.

May 8, 2017

Save the date for a lecture by 2016-2107 Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar Omer Bartov.

Opportunities

Call for Applications

Third Workshop for Advanced PhD Candidates from North American Universities and Israel who are working on the Holocaust

Due March 15th, 2017

Yad Vashem’s International Research Institute and the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research encourage PhD candidates from the United States, Canada, and Israel to submit their applications for this joint workshop that will bring together graduate students to present their dissertation projects on the Holocaust, including its antecedents and aftermath, to exchange ideas, conduct research in the Yad Vashem Archives. The workshop will take place from 25-29 June 2017 at Yad Vashem, The World Holocaust Remembrance Center, in Jerusalem, Israel. All topics on the Holocaust and proposals from all disciplines are open for consideration.

For more details, click here.

International Teaching Fellowship 2017-2018

Due March 31, 2017

The International Teaching Fellowship provides support for university and college faculty to integrate testimonies from the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive (VHA) into new or existing courses. The fellowship is open to all disciplinary and methodological approaches. It is available to faculty at universities and colleges worldwide that subscribe to the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive.

For more details, click here.

In addition, click below to read about opportunities for specific university teaching fellowships at:

Texas A&M University (A.I. and Manet Schepps Foundation Teaching Fellow Program)

University of Pennsylvania (Rutman Fellowship for Research and Teaching)

USC Graduate/Faculty Summer Research Fellowships 2017

Due March 31, 2017

The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research invites research proposals from USC faculty members and graduate students for its Summer 2017 Research Fellowships. The fellowships provide $3,000 support for USC faculty and USC graduate students doing research focused on the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive and/or other unique USC resources and collections during the summer of 2017. The fellowship is open to USC faculty and USC graduate students of all disciplines. A limited number of fellowships are available. Award decisions for this fellowship will be based on the originality of the research proposal and the centrality of USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive and/or other relevant USC resources to the research project.

For more details, click here.

DEFY Undergraduate Summer Research Fellowships 2017

Due March 31, 2017

The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research invites research proposals from USC undergraduate students for its 2017 DEFY Summer Research Fellowships. The fellowships provide $1,000 support for USC undergraduates doing research focused on the testimonies of the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive and/or other related USC resources and collections during the summer of 2017. The fellowship is open to USC undergraduate students of all disciplines. A
limited number of fellowships are available. Award decisions for the DEFY fellowships will be based on the originality of the research proposal and the centrality of USC resources to the research project.

For more information, click here.

Donate to Special Collections

Please consider donating private papers, documents, photographs or films regarding the Holocaust and other genocides. The Center works with USC Libraries Special Collections to preserve private collections and make them accessible for academic research worldwide and student investigation at USC.

To find out more about donating materials, email us as cagr@usc.edu or call 213-740-6001.

For more information about the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research and its work, please visit our website at: cagr.usc.edu

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