Center Newsletters

January 2018 Newsletter

Mon, 01/15/2018 - 12:10pm -- Isabella

Happy New Year! With the start of the year we kicked off our Spring 2018 semester programming and activities. 

We began the month of January by welcoming our first-ever Breslauer, Rutman and Anderson research fellow Diane Marie Amann, who, in addition to being a professor of international law at the University of Georgia School of Law, is also a PhD candidate in Law at Leiden University (the Netherlands). Professor Amann used her one-month residency at the Center to explore the Visual History Archive to find testimonies about the involvement of women in the Nuremberg war crimes trials. She ended her time at the Center with a well-attended lecture discussing her findings (read more below).

We continued our work igniting engagement with the Visual History Archive (VHA). We provided introductions to the VHA to two undergraduate classes and several faculty. We also met with distinguished visitors to introduce them to the Center’s programs and activities.

We are thrilled to start the year with two exciting announcements about the illustrious and innovative scholars who will be visiting the Center this year as fellows. First, the Center has awarded its most esteemed fellowship to Christopher Browning (Emeritus, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), one of the foremost scholars of Nazi Germany and Holocaust. As the 2017-2018 Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar in Residence he will visit the Center to deliver a public lecture this Spring. We are also delighted to announce that Jean-Marc Dreyfus (University of Manchester, United Kingdom) has been awarded the 2018-2019 Center Research Fellowship. He will join us in the Fall for one semester to conduct research with the VHA. You can read more about both scholars below.  

The Center is excited to open the competition for the summer fellowships for USC students (both undergraduate and graduate students) and USC faculty. The calls for applications are linked below. We are also still inviting applications for the Center’s International Teaching Fellowship for faculty at VHA access sites. The deadline is approaching soon. 

In February, we are looking forward to welcoming our 2017-2018 Katz Research Fellow in Genocide Studies Kathryn Brackney (PhD candidate, Yale University) as well as to a number of events, including a presentation by the Center’s Summer 2017 research fellows and a lecture by the esteemed British scholar Philippe Sands about his newest book, East West Street: A Personal Story of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity. Read more about these events below.

Finally, as we begin another new year at the Center, I’m eager to introduce you to two new staff members, Badema Pitic, PhD, and Isabella Lloyd-Damnjanovic, who recently started at the Center. Their different disciplinary perspectives and expertise, along with their energy, passion, and commitment, already enrich the programs and activities of the Center and contribute to the success of all we do. You can read more about them below.

 

Wolf Gruner


Founding Director of the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research
Professor of History and Shapell-Guerin Chair in Jewish Studies

 

Events

“Women at Nuremberg”

2017-2018 Breslauer, Rutman and Anderson Research Fellow Diane Marie Amann gave a public lecture on the little-known involvement of women in the war crimes trials at Nuremberg after the Second World War. During her month-long residency at the Center, Amann utilized more than 20 testimonies in the VHA to dig deeper into personal stories of these unknown or overlooked  women involved in the Nuremberg trials and to re-situate their contributions in the event’s historical memory. In her lecture, she discussed the work of many hidden female figures, related anecdotes from their time in Nuremberg, and contemplated the reasons why women have largely been forgotten in historical accounts of the trials. The well received lecture attracted an audience of more than 60 people.

Watch the lecture and read the summary here.

Read more about Diane Marie Amann here.

Research  

Christopher Browning
2017-2018 Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar in Residence 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Professor Emeritus Christopher R. Browning will serve as the Center’s 2017-2018 Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar in Residence. Browning, an internationally renowned Holocaust historian who is well known for utilizing survivor testimony to reconstruct the history and human relationships in one forced labor camp in occupied Poland during the Holocaust, will deliver the annual Sara and Asa Shapiro Lecture this Spring. His research concerns topics such as the decision-making and policy-making behind the Nazi Final Solution, the behavior and motives of middle and lower-echelon personnel in its implementation, and Jewish resistance and survival strategies during the Holocaust. 

Read more here.

 

Jean-Marc Dreyfus
2018-2019 Center Research Fellow 

Jean-Marc Dreyfus, a senior reader in the history department of the University of Manchester, UK has been awarded the 2018-2019 Center Research Fellowship. Professor Dreyfus, a prolific and innovative writer and researcher, is an expert in Holocaust Studies and the politics of memory. He plans to use his semester in residence at the Center to investigate testimonies from the VHA that can contribute to his current research on the aftermath of genocide, more specifically Holocaust forensics and the history of the human remains of the victims of the mass violence.  

Read more here

 

Visiting Scholar Julien Zarifian’s New Book 

Join the Center in celebrating the recent publication of a book by the Center’s visiting Fulbright scholar Julien Zarifian (Université de Cergy-Pontoise). In Choc d’Empires? Les relations États-Unis / Iran du XIXe siècle à nos jours (Clash of Empires? US-Iran Relations From the 19th Century to the Present), Professor Zarifian analyzes bilateral relations between the United States and Iran from the 19th century to today and their impact on Middle Eastern geopolitics. The book is the result of his previous research project he conducted before beginning his investigation into why the United States has failed to officially recognize the massacre of Ottoman Armenians in 1915-16 as genocide. Professor Zarifian will discuss his current research in an April lecture entitled “The U.S. and the Question of the Armenian Genocide.”

 

Recent Outreach 

This month, the Center welcomed students from both USC and Soka University and provided introductions to the Visual History Archive. Professor Britta Bothe brought her USC undergraduate class – “The German Exile Experience” –  to learn how to navigate the VHA for a class assignment on persecuted groups. Students from the Soka University class “The Prevention of Genocide and Mass Atrocities” visited to learn about how the VHA can be used for research and how the testimonies themselves can contribute to genocide prevention. The Center also met with PhD candidates, faculty, and distinguished visitors to introduce them to the Visual History Archive and the work of the Center more broadly. In February, Center founding director Wolf Gruner will participate in a panel discussion on the documentary film “Joachim Prinz: I Shall Not Be Silent” at Temple Beth Am Los Angeles.

Meet the New Staff of the Center 

Badema Pitic, PhD


Badema Pitic is the Visual History Archive Program Coordinator at the Center for Advanced Genocide Research. Badema earned her PhD in Ethnomusicology from UCLA in 2017. Badema’s research focuses on the intersections of music, memory, and politics in the aftermath of war and genocide in Bosnia-Herzegovina, with a special emphasis on the role of music in the reinforcement and dissemination of official and individual narratives of the genocide. She worked as a Curator at the Department of Ethnology of the National Museum of Bosnia-Herzegovina, and obtained her BA and MA in Ethnomusicology from the University of Sarajevo before moving to the United States. Prior to her appointment at the Center, Badema worked as a Lecturer at the California Institute of the Arts, as a coordinator for UCLA Ethnomusicology Publications and as an archive assistant at the UCLA Ethnomusicology Archive. 

Isabella Lloyd-Damnjanovic, BA

Isabella Lloyd-Damnjanovic is the Program Coordinator at the Center for Advanced Genocide Research. As a recent graduate of Princeton University with a major in sociology and a minor in ethics, Isabella is particularly interested in how academic research can influence policymaking and advance social justice. While at Princeton, she conducted research on variation in immigrants’ attitudes toward immigration policy across the American Southwest. She has previously worked with the National Immigration Forum, the International Panel on Social Progress and the Pacific Council on International Policy. In addition to her work at USC Shoah Foundation, Isabella is a tutor with Gold Medal Grads, a nonprofit that offers free college coaching and tutoring to underserved youth. In the future, she plans on attending graduate school to pursue a degree in international policy and development with a focus on ethnic conflict.


Marika Stanford-Moore, MA

Marika Stanford-Moore is the Assistant Program Coordinator at the Center for Advanced Genocide Research. As an anthropologist and filmmaker, Marika holds a Masters degree in Visual Anthropology (documentary filmmaking) from USC. She documents the values and practices of alternative birthing in Los Angeles. Her first documentary film, Dance of Three, is a 30-minute visual ethnography focusing on a couple’s home birthing process, with the support of a doula (non-medical birth coach). Marika’s passion for reproductive justice and women’s health have drawn her to the storytelling nature of documentary film. In the past, she has worked for environmental nonprofit Grades of Green, USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism and production company Planet C Studios. When she’s not working at the Shoah Foundation, Marika can be found serving as an abortion doula or teaching yoga. 

 

Upcoming Events
 

February 8, 2018 at 4 pm

USC Research with Testimonies: Featuring the Center's Summer Research 2017 Fellows 

February 20, 2018 at 5pm

Samuel Kassow’s lecture: “What Was Unique About the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising?” Part of the series “Hidden Archives – Public Struggles: Events Commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising”. Presented by Doheny Memorial Library and co-sponsored by the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research.

February 26, 2018 at 4 pm

Philippe Sands's lecture: "East West Street": On the Origins of 'Genocide' and 'Crimes against Humanity'

March 1, 2018 at 4 pm

Jennie Burnet's lecture: "Good Amidst Evil: Rescue During the Rwandan Genocide"

March 22, 2018 at 4 pm

2017-2018 Katz Research Fellow Kathryn Brackney's lecture: "Phantom Geographies in Representations of the Holocaust"

 

More information about April events coming soon! 

April 2, 2018 at 5 pm

Save the date for a screening of excerpts from Roberta Grossman’s documentary film about the Oyneg Shabes Archive, presented in partnership with USC Doheny Memorial Library.

April 3, 2018 at 7 pm

Save the date for 500 Years, a documentary film about resistance in Guatemala, presented in partnership with USC School of Cinematic Arts.  

April 12, 2018 at 4pm (UCLA)

Save the date for Samuel Kassow’s lecture "History and Resistance: Emanuel Ringelblum in the Warsaw Ghetto."

 

Opportunities
 

Call for Applications

2018-2019 International Teaching Fellowship

The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research invites proposals for its 2018-2019 International Teaching Fellowship that will provide support for university and college faculty to integrate testimonies from the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive (VHA) into new or existing courses. This fellowship is only available to faculty at universities and colleges that subscribe to the VHA, either directly or through ProQuest. Deadline to apply is February 15, 2018. For more details, click here

 

Summer 2018 Undergraduate Research Fellowship

The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research invites research proposals from USC undergraduate students for its 2018 Summer Research Fellowships, which provide support for USC undergraduates doing research focused on the testimonies of the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive and/or other related USC resources and collections during the summer of 2018. Deadline to apply is March 31, 2018. For more details, click here.

 
Summer 2018 Faculty and Graduate Student Research Fellowships

The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research invites research proposals from USC faculty members and graduate students for its Summer 2018 Research Fellowships, which provide support for USC faculty and USC graduate students doing research focused on the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive and/or other unique USC resources and collections during the summer of 2018. Deadline to apply is March 31, 2018. For more details, click here.

 

Career Opportunity at the Center                                                                     

Academic Relations and Outreach Officer 

The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research is currently seeking a Senior Research Associate (Academic Relations and Outreach Officer) to join USC’s Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History in the Center for Advanced Genocide Research. The Academic Relations and Outreach Officer will be responsible for conceptualizing, developing, and managing projects and programs geared towards reaching the academic community within USC and beyond, in order to raise the profile of the Center’s events, opportunities, and activities and to promote use of the Visual History Archive in research and teaching. The successful candidate should have excellent analytical, writing, and communication skills. They should be knowledgeable in Holocaust or Genocide Studies and possess strong leadership, organizational, project development, and coordination skills. They will be expected to conduct original research in their field of expertise.

Applications are under ongoing review so we recommend applying promptly, if interested. For more details, click here.

Donate to Special Collections

Please consider donating private papers, documents, photographs or films regarding the Holocaust and other genocides. The Center works with USC Libraries Special Collections to preserve private collections and make them accessible for academic research worldwide and student investigation at USC.

To find out more about donating materials, email us as cagr@usc.edu or call 213-740-6001.

For more information about the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research and its work, please visit our website at: cagr.usc.edu

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