Academic Discussions & Lectures

2016/04/11 Visiting Scholar Atina Grossmann: Remapping Survival

Language: English

In this lecture, Professor Atina Grossmann addresses a transnational Holocaust story that remarkably – despite several decades of intensive scholarly and public attention to the history and memory of the Shoah – has remained essentially untold, marginalized in both historiography and commemoration.

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Alexander Hinton Lecture on Duch Trial

Alexander Hinton discussed his new book Man or Monster? The Trial of a Khmer Rouge Torturer. In his book, Professor Hinton uses creative ethnographic writing, extensive fieldwork, hundreds of interviews, and his experience attending Duch's trial to create a nuanced analysis of Duch, the tribunal, the Khmer Rouge, and the after-effects of Cambodia's genocide.

Armenian Genocide Survivor Testimonies and the Evolution of Their Use

In this lecture, Dr. Boris Adjemian speaks about the making of Armenian archival collections of victims' testimonies after the genocide and the evolution of their historiographical uses.

Christian Delage Lecturing on Different Forms of Testimony

Historian and filmmaker Christian Delage (Institut D’Histoire Du Temps Présent, Paris) gave a public lecture at the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research focusing on analysis of different forms of testimony — in war crimes trials, oral history repositories, and documentary - and his recent project collecting interviews about the November 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris.

Memories of Mobility, Migration and Integration

On August 24, 2017, scholars from Latin America presented their initial findings on their use of the Visual History Archive and mapped out potential avenues of inquiry focusing on Holocaust survivors who eventually settled in Latin America. This presentation is one of the outcomes of a "scholar in residence" fellowship that brings together scholars from a variety of disciplines to collaborate on a research project at USC for Interdisciplinary Research Week.

Anatomy of a Genocide

Omer Bartov gave a lecture on May 8, 2017, on how the East Galician town of Buczacz was transformed from a site of coexistence, where Poles, Ukrainians, and Jews had lived side-by-side for centuries, into a site of genocide. What were the reasons for this instance of communal violence, what were its dynamics, and why has it been erased from the local memory?

Professor Bartov is the 2017 Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar at USC Center for Advanced Genocide Research.

Collaborators: Exploring Participation in the Holocaust by Non-Germans in Eastern Europe

In this lecture, Professor Alexander Korb explores the phenomenon of collaboration, drawing from a number of country case studies in Eastern and Southeastern Europe. He argues that we need to include Jewish perspectives in order to understand collaboration, because Jews knew their collaborating neighbors much better than the Germans did.

2016 Summer Research Fellows' Presentations

Four of USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research’s summer 2016 research fellows returned to the Institute on Tuesday, April 4, 2017, to share the outcomes of their fellowships and the impact of testimony on their work.

All the fellows are studying or teaching at USC and spent at least several weeks in residence at the Center last summer to conduct research in the Visual History Archive.

Teresa Walch lectures on erasure of Jewish spaces in Nazi Germany

In her public lecture on Feb. 9, 2017, at USC, Robert J. Katz Research Fellow Teresa Walch outlines the process by which Jews in Berlin lost their rights, access to public spaces, ability to move freely, and finally their own homes, from 1933-38. Throughout her talk, Walch refers to the testimonies in the Visual History Archive that she has discovered of Holocaust survivors who describe living through this period and its effect on them.

Benjamin Madley's Lecture on Genocide of California Native Americans

On October 11, 2016, Dr. Benjamin Madley presented a lecture detailing just some of his exhaustive research on the systematic extermination of California’s indigenous population from the first wave of gold rush settlers to the beginning of California’s third decade as an American state. The result of that research is his book An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846-1873.

Barbara Stimler on the Kutno ghetto

Barbara Stimler describes the conditions of the Kutno ghetto in Poland.

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