Academic Discussions & Lectures

Collaborators: Exploring Participation in the Holocaust by Non-Germans in Eastern Europe

Language: English

In this lecture, Professor Alexander Korb explores the phenomenon of collaboration, drawing from a number of country case studies in Eastern and Southeastern Europe. He argues that we need to include Jewish perspectives in order to understand collaboration, because Jews knew their collaborating neighbors much better than the Germans did.

Good Amidst Evil: Rescue During the Rwandan Genocide

Georgia State University professor Jennie Burnet lectures on the moment-by-moment changing landscape of the genocide against the Tutsis in Rwanda that resists efforts to formulate a structural model of rescuer behavior.

Philippe Sands on Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity under International Law

In this lecture, Philippe Sands discusses his most recent book East West Street: On the Origins of 'Genocide' and 'Crimes Against Humanity' — part historical detective story, part family history, part legal thriller — to connect his work on 'crimes against humanity' and 'genocide', the events that overwhelmed his family in Lviv during World War II, and the untold story at the heart of the Nuremberg trial that pits lawyers Rafael Lemkin and Hersch Lauterpacht against Hans Frank, defendant number 7, former Governor General of Nazi-occupied Poland and Adolf Hitler's lawyer.

USC Research With Testimonies: Featuring the Center's Summer 2017 Research Fellows

This lecture features two of our summer 2017 research fellows: Maria Zalewska, PhD candidate in Cinema and Media Studies and Mellon PhD Fellow in the Digital Humanities, USC School of Cinematic Arts, and Noha Ayoub, USC undergraduate student majoring in Law, History and Culture and minoring in Middle East Studies.

Women at Nuremberg

Drawing on USC Shoah Foundation oral history videos, personal papers, and other sources, Dr. Diane Marie Amann's lecture situates stories of the unsung women who played vital roles at Nuremberg in the context of the Nuremberg trials themselves, international law, and the postwar global society.

Diane Marie Amann is the inaugural 2017-2018 Breslauer, Rutman and Anderson Research Fellow.

Professor Geraldien von Frijtag Drabbe Künzel's lecture "Being and Belonging: Jewish-Gentile Relations in the Occupied Netherlands Through the Lens of a Microscope"

In this lecture, Professor Geraldien von Frijtag Drabbe Künzel explores Jewish-gentile relations in the Netherlands in the years just before, during and just after the Holocaust.

Irina Rebrova's lecture on "The Role of Oral History Interviews in Regional Holocaust Memory: The Case of the North Caucasus"

In this lecture, Irina Rebrova discusses her research on the process of remembrance and translation of the memory about the Holocaust in the North Caucasus, South of Russia. She studies the mechanism of storytelling by Holocaust survivors interviewed by the Shoah Foundation in the early Post-Soviet states in the 1990s.

Alexander Hinton Lecture on Duch Trial

Alexander Hinton discussed his new book Man or Monster? The Trial of a Khmer Rouge Torturer. In his book, Professor Hinton uses creative ethnographic writing, extensive fieldwork, hundreds of interviews, and his experience attending Duch's trial to create a nuanced analysis of Duch, the tribunal, the Khmer Rouge, and the after-effects of Cambodia's genocide.

Armenian Genocide Survivor Testimonies and the Evolution of Their Use

In this lecture, Dr. Boris Adjemian speaks about the making of Armenian archival collections of victims' testimonies after the genocide and the evolution of their historiographical uses.

Christian Delage Lecturing on Different Forms of Testimony

Historian and filmmaker Christian Delage (Institut D’Histoire Du Temps Présent, Paris) gave a public lecture at the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research focusing on analysis of different forms of testimony — in war crimes trials, oral history repositories, and documentary - and his recent project collecting interviews about the November 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris.

Memories of Mobility, Migration and Integration

On August 24, 2017, scholars from Latin America presented their initial findings on their use of the Visual History Archive and mapped out potential avenues of inquiry focusing on Holocaust survivors who eventually settled in Latin America. This presentation is one of the outcomes of a "scholar in residence" fellowship that brings together scholars from a variety of disciplines to collaborate on a research project at USC for Interdisciplinary Research Week.