Academic Discussions & Lectures

2014/11/17 International Conference Panel: "Social Engagements with Holocaust Remembrance in New Media"

Language: English

As time continues to separate listeners from the recounting of events what is the role of new technology in ensuring the voices of first hand witnesses are heard? The focus of this panel is on how new media technology prompts a rethinking of approaches to remembrance. How can new media re-contextualize or enhance the experience of the listener? What new tools are available to academics? What new or unheard voices will become available?

Chair: Johanna Blakley, Ph.D. 

Rachel Baum, Ph.D. 

Aya Yadlin-Segal

Paris Papamichos Chronakis, Ph.D.

MORE CLIPS...
  • As time continues to separate listeners from the recounting of events what is the role of new technology in ensuring the voices of first hand witnesses are heard? The focus of this panel is on how new media technology prompts a rethinking of approaches to remembrance. How can new media re-contextualize or enhance the experience of the listener? What new tools are available to academics? What new or unheard voices will become available?

    Chair: Johanna Blakley, Ph.D. 

    Rachel Baum, Ph.D. 

    Aya Yadlin-Segal

    Paris Papamichos Chronakis, Ph.D.

  • Once events are recorded in media it becomes a challenge to control or anticipate how that media will be used. Some voices become dominant while others fade out of memory. How is a contextualized narrative produced or reconciled? How do academics make sense of media that was created with differing methodologies or research practices? The research of this panel focuses on cases that elucidate these challenges. 

    Chair: Geoffrey Robinson, Ph.D.

    Stef Scagliola, Ph.D.

    Amy Rothschild, J.D.

    Viola Lasmana

  • The research of these panelists sheds light on various challenges in mediating oral histories. Is it possible to mediate oral histories in an archive and respect the authenticity and nuance of individual narratives that fall into a larger narrative, for instance in an archive? Questions of translation, distortion, and interview methodology are explored to varying degrees by the work of these presenters. Is it possible to convey specific emotions across cultures, language, and identity?

    Chair: Karen Jungblut

    Peg LeVine, Ph.D., Ed.D.

    Mark Zaurov, Ph.D.

  • Dr. Jared McBride, 2014-2015 recipient of the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research's Douglas and Margee Greenberg Research Fellowship discusses how oral history and testimony can be integrated with existing archival documents to recreate a micro-level history of the Holocaust in western Ukraine.

  • November 11, 2014:   How can analyses of Holocaust witnessing be approached in spatial terms? Simone Gigliotti's lecture drew primarily on the USC Shoah Foundation testimony of two Holocaust-era witnesses with postwar profiles of testimony giving—a slave laborer in a death brigade, and a ghetto internee who survived on false papers. Gigliotti uses Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to render the witness testimony in spatial terms.

  • July 24, 2014: Harry Reicher, Professor of Law at University of Pennsylvania and USC Shoah Foundation's inaugural Rutman Teaching Fellow, utilized his fellowship to collect Holocaust survivor testimony content he could utilize in his classes, which currently make liberal use of multimedia content.

    Featuring historical footage, Nazi propaganda film, modern cinema clips, and Visual History Archive testimony, Reicher's lecture provided an overview of the Nazi legal system and demonstrated the value of film in teaching this subject.

  • May 9, 2014:  Earlier this year, Dajani made headlines when Palestinian and Israeli media reported on the trip to Poland he took with thirty Palestinian students, in which he brought the students to Auschwitz and other concentration camps to learn about the Holocaust. Palestinian media attacked him, accusing him of attempting to brainwash his students or turn them into Zionists, and he was fired by his union.

  • March 28, 2013:  The Student Voices short film contest enables USC students to join the conversation about genocide and human rights by using the Visual History Archive to craft visual arguments around these topics. The top films were screened at a special event hosted by the USC School of Cinematic Arts. Following the screening, Stephen D. Smith, Executive Director of the USC Shoah Foundation, moderated a discussion with the judges, including Ari Sandel, who won the 2006 Academy Award for Best Short Film for West Bank Story.

  • April 29, 2014: The USC Shoah Foundation Student Association brought Holocaust survivor Celina Biniaz, Cambodian Genocide survivor Sara Pol-Lim, and Rwandan Genocide survivor Edith Umugiraneza together for a panel and Q&A about women in genocide, moderated by USC Shoah Foundation Executive Director Stephen Smith. Syuzanna Petrosyan, a USC graduate student and third-generation descendant of Armenian Genocide survivors, introduced the event.

  • February 20, 2014: A conversation with the United Nations Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict

    Speaking at USC on February 20, Zainab Hawa Banguara, the United Nations Undersecretary-General and Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict, said that sexual assault is a deliberate tactic used to demoralize not only women – its most frequent targets – but also destroy families and tear apart communities.

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