Academic Discussions & Lectures

2014/02/18: Finding the Human in Digital Humanities

Language: English

February 18, 2014: In our current digital landscape, information is available at a much faster speed, from a larger variety of sources, and through new mediums. This availability of resources has changed not just the way society stays informed, but the way academic subjects are both explored and taught.

The discussion “Finding the Human in Digital Humanities: How Many Bytes Does it take to Get to the Center?” was moderated by Kori Street, director of education at the USC Shoah Foundation.

Panelists:
- James Collins, assistant professor of classics
- Mark C. Marino, associate professor of writing, director for the Humanities and Critical Code Studies Lab and director of communication of the Electronic Literature Organization
- Holly Willis, Chair of Media Arts + Practice Division, Director of the Institute for Multimedia Literacy at USC School of Cinematic Arts

Co-Sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics.

 
MORE CLIPS...
  • February 18, 2014: In our current digital landscape, information is available at a much faster speed, from a larger variety of sources, and through new mediums. This availability of resources has changed not just the way society stays informed, but the way academic subjects are both explored and taught.

    The discussion “Finding the Human in Digital Humanities: How Many Bytes Does it take to Get to the Center?” was moderated by Kori Street, director of education at the USC Shoah Foundation.

  • April 7, 2014:  USC students in the Shoah Foundation Student Association coordinated a vigil for the 20th anniversary of the 1994  Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda, structured around "Remember, Unite, Renew" -- the three themes of Kwibuka20, the international movement to commemorate 20 years since the genocide.

    Students read excerpts of survivor testimony, gave speeches, performed an original piano-violin duet (written by 2013 PWP Rwanda student Ambrose Soehn), and gathered for a traditional Rwandan dance performance.

  • March 6, 2014: Student Voices invites all USC graduate and undergraduate students, regardless of major, to create short films that incorporate testimony from USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive.
    This year’s themes were: Preserving Humanity, Renewing Rwanda, and Risking Everything. All themes represent the coinciding 20th anniversaries of Schindler’s List in 2013 and the founding of the Shoah Foundation and the Rwanda Tutsi genocide in 2014.

    The video shows USC Shoah Foundation’s annual awards ceremony. 

  • April 2, 2014:  Yannick Tona, currently a student at Texas Christian University, speaks to students in the USC Shoah Foundation Student Association of his experiences during the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda, which took the lives of most of his family, and of how he connected these horrors from his past to his humanitarian efforts of today.

    For more information on Yannick: http://www.yannicktona.com/

  • March 24, 2014: 2014 Senior Institute Fellow Dr. Douglas Greenberg, Rutgers University Distinguished Professor of History, discusses a place that was in six different countries in the 20th century: the region of Wolyn, which is now in Ukraine. He is currently conducting research to reconstruct the experience of the survivors of the Holocaust who came from Wolyn, where 250,000 Jews were murdered before the death camps were completely operational.

  • April 12, 2012: British poet Richard Berengarten (previously known as Richard Burns)  read from his book

  • November 7, 2013: How does location impact the way teaching the Holocaust is approached? USC Shoah Foundation brought together Professors Yehuda Bauer and Xu Xin for the first time in a discussion of the differences of teaching Jewish Studies and the Holocaust in Israel and China. Each will explore the challenges they face in dealing with the Holocaust and comparative genocide in their cultural, linguistic, and historical context.

  • November 15, 2012: Dr. Sean Field discussed oral histories in the context of both the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Centre for Popular Memory in South Africa and approaches to studying memories of violence.

  • September 27, 2012: Cambodian genocide survivor Kosal Path, a lecturer in the USC School of International Relations and a USC Shoah Foundation Fellow, discussed his research on social rehabilitation in post-genocide Cambodia.

  • January 18, 2012: Resistance during the Holocaust is still mostly seen in terms of organized or armed group activities, yet this perspective overlooks individual acts of opposition. Up to now, the availability of sources for analyzing the behavior of German Jews has been limited. Historians used reports originated by the Nazi state and/or written post-war testimonies. In those sources individual acts of opposition barely emerge. However, a closer analysis of the micro level of Nazi society challenges the common image of German Jews as passive victims.

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