Press Coverage

Jewish Journal, April 14, 2017

Last summer, I watched the disturbingly iconic reel of black-and-white footage that revealed the shameful truth of Bergen-Belsen.

The grainy footage, which many of us have seen, was taken at the concentration camp in Germany, a few days after the liberation on April 15, 1945. It offered one of the first glimpses into the hell that was the Holocaust. Under the armed command of liberators from the British Army, SS men are seen unloading the skeletal corpses of the Jews they’d murdered from the back of a pickup truck, and carrying them to a mass grave.

Slate, April 14, 2017

Historian Julia Werner discovered this set of photos in the Jewish Museum in Rendsburg, Germany, and they constitute one of the only visual records we have of the construction of an open-air ghetto. Taken on June 16, 1940, by German soldier Wilhelm Hansen, the 83 images (a selection of which can be seen below) track the forced movement of the Jewish population of Kutno, Poland, from their homes to the grounds of an abandoned sugar factory, where they were ordered to set up camp.

Voice of America, April 14, 2017

There were audible gasps in the White House press room Tuesday when spokesman Sean Spicer appeared to forget about the Holocaust in asserting that the Syrian military's use of sarin gas on civilians exceeded the atrocities of Nazi Germany.

With Spicer's credibility already strained, opposition Democrats and others began calling for the White House press secretary to be removed from his position.

Daily Trojan, February 9, 2017

More than 70 years have passed since the end of World War II, but USC’s expanded collection of wartime artifacts may soon be able to offer new historical insights.
David and Andrea Stanley donated hundreds of items to USC Libraries and the USC Shoah Foundation’s Center for Advanced Genocide Research. The objects came from Andrea Stanley’s father Harry Wolff, Jr., an American Jewish soldier who served in Europe during the war, and includes numerous paper documents that depict Wolff’s wartime experiences.

Los Angeles Times, December 16, 2016

Filmmaker Steven Spielberg and the USC Shoah Foundation honored filmmaker George Lucas and his investment executive-wife, Mellody Hobson, for their commitment to education, diversity and humanitarian efforts during the Ambassadors for Humanity Gala at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at the Hollywood & Highland center in Hollywood.

Los Angeles Jewish Journal, December 16, 2016

  For those eager to rub shoulders with Hollywood royalty, a great place to be was the annual Ambassadors for Humanity gala, benefiting the USC Shoah Foundation — The Institute for Visual History and Education.

Twin Cities Pioneer Press, December 1, 2016

No question, Paula Cuéllar was born to be a human rights crusader.

Who?

She is but one example of people who walk among us with stories worth telling.

Education World, November 8, 2016

A digital literacy activity created by the USC Shoah Foundation and available on iWitness, a free online education platform, helps students understand the difference between arguments, persuasion and propaganda on social media channels.

Canadian Jewish News, October 29, 2016

A new initiative to digitize the invaluable testimony of Holocaust survivors should help permanently preserve this key resource for future generations, say archivists who are leading the effort.

The Armenian Mirror-Spectator, October 27, 2016

DETROIT — On Tuesday, October 18, St. John Church of Southfield hosted Dr. Stephen Smith of the University of Southern California Shoah Foundation. Smith is the UNESCO Chair on Genocide Education; he visited the St. John Church and the adjacent Alex and Marie Manoogian Museum.

Xinhuanet.com, October 25, 2016

LOS ANGELES, Oct. 24 (Xinhua) -- Plainly dressed in a dark gray suit, 87-year-old Xia Shuqin seemed no different from any other suburban Chinese lady. However, her weatherworn face and her determined eyes suggested that her story was different: She had survived the Nanjing Massacre.

Jewish Exponent, October 19, 2016

By Jon Marks | JE Staff 

Oskar Schindler, look what you’ve done. 

The man who personally saved some 1,200 Jews from certain extermination by the Nazis by employing them in his factories — using most of his financial resources to protect them — has been gone for more than 40 years.

But his work and legacy lives on. So touched by the story he brought to life in 1993 and the subsequent reaction to his film Schindler’s List, Steven Spielberg decided he had to do more.

Daily Trojan, October 11, 2016

By HARSHINI CHENGAREDDY

The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research hosted Benjamin Madley Tuesday to speak about the controversial murder of as many as 16,000 Native Americans by vigilantes, state volunteer militiamen and U.S. Army soldiers during the period between 1846 and 1873.

Deadline, September 2, 2016

Among world premieres unspooling this weekend at the Telluride Film Festival is a harrowing new documentary Finding Oscarwhich is produced by Frank Marshall and executive produced by Steven Spielberg in association with the USC Shoah Foundation. The docu directed by Ryan Suffern will have its first showing here in the Rockies on Saturday afternoon. You can see Deadline’s premiere of the film’s trailer above.

Asbarez, August 9, 2016

LOS ANGELES (USC Shoah Foundation)—All testimonies from USC Shoah Foundation’s Armenian Genocide collection have been indexed and will be integrated into the Visual History Archive (VHA) in the coming months.

Indexer Manuk Avedikyan completed the last 88 of the 333 testimonies in the collection last week. The collection was first introduced with 60 testimonies that were added to the VHA on April 24, 2015, the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. Another 185 indexed testimonies were added to the collection in April of this year.

My Central New Jersey, August 4, 2016

Maya Montell, Allison Vandal and Caroline Waters’ video about the creation of a poetry group at Readington Middle School has won USC Shoah Foundation’s 2016 iWitness Video Challenge.  The eighth-graders’ newly created Poets Undercover Guild provides an opportunity for their peers to express their feelings and appreciation for each other by using the power of words in the sharing of poetry.

California Educator, August 1, 2016

IWitness connects students with history, current events through universal human experience.

The Creators Project, June 28, 2016

New Dimensions in Testimony is a multidisciplinary tech project that lets users converse in dialogue with Holocaust survivors.

The Guardian, June 18, 2016

Pinchas Gutter goes out of his way to find me biscuits. In a sun-baked living room in his north London home, he opens a packet of Rich Tea, sits down and tells me about the Holocaust.

Gutter was seven years old when the second world war broke out. He lived in the Warsaw ghetto for three and a half years, took part in its uprising, survived six Nazi concentration camps – including the Majdanek extermination camp – and lived through a death march across Germany to Theresienstadt in occupied Czechoslovakia.

The Guardian, June 18, 2016

Pinchas Gutter goes out of his way to find me biscuits. In a sun-baked living room in his north London home, he opens a packet of Rich Tea, sits down and tells me about the Holocaust.

Gutter was seven years old when the second world war broke out. He lived in the Warsaw ghetto for three and a half years, took part in its uprising, survived six Nazi concentration camps – including the Majdanek extermination camp – and lived through a death march across Germany to Theresienstadt in occupied Czechoslovakia.

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