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Tuesday, December 10, 2013
“Time heals all wounds,” they say.It’s difficult to find any other element in our daily lives that possesses the sobering effect that time does. It tames emotions and calms nerves. It allows for much needed reflection and analysis. And, perhaps most importantly, it brings with it resolution and closure. By any account, a century would be more than enough time to heal even the deepest wound, but, surprisingly, time’s impact isn’t always as thorough as we’d expect it to be.
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
A few weeks ago I went shopping at one of my favorite bookstores in Los Angeles. However, I wasn’t picking out a few books that would sit on my metro-read shelf. I was with a few USC Shoah Foundation colleagues—picking out an entire collection of Armenian Genocide History resources for the Doheny Library.A few of my colleagues and I were tasked with picking out resources to expand the library’s collection. We were shopping for the future genocide researchers, scholars, and educators.
Friday, May 2, 2014
When I was a child, my grandfather often told me about the Second World War. While he sat next to me, coloring or teaching me letters of the alphabet, he would sneak in a story about his days in the Soviet army. He would tell me about his post as a commander of a marine unit and how his forces liberated an Austrian town under Nazi occupation.
Monday, August 31, 2015
Looking into a mirror and making sure her hair looked just so, Yevnigue Salibian didn’t notice me as I was taking her picture. It took a few seconds, but when she finally realized I had documented her act of vanity, she smiled coyly.
Friday, May 23, 2014
Armenian Genocide survivor Yevnige Salibian speaks about forgiveness and current genocide denial.
Friday, May 30, 2014
J. Michael Hagopian's prized 16mm Ariflex camera, which he used to record testimonies of Armenian Genocide survivors, is now in the possession of the USC Shoah Foundation.
Friday, May 30, 2014
Sam Kadorian speaks on being an eyewitness to the Armenian Genocide. Kadorian’s testimony is part of the new Armenian Genocide collection.
Tuesday, June 17, 2014
USC Shoah Foundation hands off books on the Armenian Genocide to USC Doheny Library’s Holocaust and Genocide Studies collection.
Tuesday, June 17, 2014
USC Shoah Foundation hands off books on the Armenian Genocide to USC Doheny Library’s Holocaust and Genocide Studies collection.Lynn Sipe, senior bibliographer and curator for the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Collection for Doheny Library, visited the Institute June 13 to pick up books and other resources on the Armenian Genocide
Friday, August 1, 2014
USC and UCLA may be rivals on the football field, but they came together for a very important cause last week - the Armenian Genocide collection.
Monday, December 29, 2014
Armenian Genocide survivor Mihran Andonian is interviewed by J. Michael Hagopian on Feb. 8, 1987. This testimony is part of USC Shoah Foundation's Armenian Genocide collection.
Monday, December 29, 2014
Armenian Genocide survivor Haroutune Aivazian is interviewed by J. Michael Hagopian on May 12, 1993. This testimony is part of USC Shoah Foundation's Armenian Genocide collection.
Monday, February 2, 2015
Historian Richard G. Hovannisian talks of straddling two cultures — and the ‘forgotten genocide’
Friday, February 6, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation Executive Director Stephen Smith will speak at the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center’s Armenian Genocide symposium this Sunday, Feb. 8.
Friday, February 20, 2015
Kori Street, USC Shoah Foundation Director of Education, will join other education experts for a panel discussion at the Responsibility 2015 conference in New York City, which will commemorate the centennial anniversary of the Armenian Genocide.
Tuesday, March 10, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation Executive Director Stephen Smith was invited to speak at the Council of American Jewish Museums (CAJM)’s annual conference and the Ararat Home of Los Angeles’s Armenian Genocide Centennial Commemoration.
Thursday, March 26, 2015
The Center is now in possession of over 40 boxes of documents from the historic Martin Marootian et al. v. New York Life Insurance Company class action lawsuit.
Friday, March 27, 2015
Raphael Zimetbaum speaks of his gratitude toward the Armenian people in Marseille, France. Along with his parents, he fled from Antwerp, Belgium, to Marseille, France, following the German invasion of Belgium in 1940. In Marseille, his family found housing within the Armenian community neighborhood, where they felt so welcome and were received with great affection. He states that he thinks that the sensitivity extended to his family may have been in part due to the history of the Armenian Genocide and the suffering the Armenian people endured at the time. 
Monday, March 30, 2015
To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide and the first integration of Armenian Genocide testimonies into the Visual History Archive, USC Shoah Foundation will release one clip from the Armenian Genocide collection on the Institute’s website each day for the next 30 days.
Monday, March 30, 2015
Professor Richard Hovannisian explains the emotion expressed in the eyewitness testimonies to the Armenian Genocide is what sets the Armenian Genocide Testimony Collection at USC Shoah Foundation apart from other written and audio testimony collections.
Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Professor Richard Hovannisian provides commentary for the testimony clip of Jirair Suchiasian.
Wednesday, April 1, 2015
Prof. Richard Hovannisian on the life and testimony of Alice Muggerditchian Shipley. This is the third testimony in the Armenian Genocide Testimony series.
Thursday, April 2, 2015
Prof. Richard Hovannisian describes the life of Armenian Genocide survivor Ashrag Dickranian. This is the fourth testimony in the Armenian Genocide Testimony clip series.
Friday, April 3, 2015
Prof. Richard Hovannisian describes the life of Armenian Genocide survivor Elsie Hagopian Taft. This is the fifth testimony in the Armenian Genocide Testimony clip series. 
Friday, April 3, 2015
Over the last several years, I’ve had the distinct privilege to work with the recorded materials collected by the late Dr. J Michael Hagopian. A survivor of the Armenian Genocide himself, Michael had the foresight to capture the voices of those who witnessed the atrocities first hand.  Later this month, the USC Shoah Foundation will make a group of 60 of these interviews available through the Visual History Archive, ensuring that these recollections will be preserved in perpetuity, for future generations.  Michael would have certainly been proud to witness this accomplishment.
Friday, April 3, 2015
After the disastrous Balkan wars of 1912-13, the Turks lost most of their European possessions. To dilute the Armenian presence and create a homogenous Turkish and Muslim population that would unequivocally support the Turkish state, the Young Turks decided on a policy of resettling Muslim refugees from the Balkan wars in Armenian areas and deporting the indigenous population.  These early measures led to the impoverishment and death of thousands; then came the First World War with Turkey taking the side of Germany against Russia and its allies.
Monday, April 6, 2015
The noted Armenian hero General Antranig Ozanian, was born on February 25, 1865, and died on August 31, 1927. He spent the final years of his life living quietly with his wife in Fresno, California.General Antranig was the most well-known of Armenian freedom fighters in the twentieth century, and his exploits are remembered by Armenians throughout the world. General Antranig is buried today at the Yerablur cemetery in Yerevan, Armenia.
Tuesday, April 7, 2015
Historians continue to debate the extent of German responsibility for the Armenian Genocide in 1915. The Ottoman Empire was an ally of Germany during WWI (1914- 1918). During the war, Germany was blamed for the Armenian Genocide. Historian Arnold Toynbee in his widely read pamphlet Armenian Atrocities published in 1915 “indicted” Germany for what he called a “shameful and terrible page of modern history” in Armenia.
Tuesday, April 7, 2015
Sam Kadorian was born in 1907 in Hussenig, a small village in the province of Kharpert, in the eastern plains of Anatolia. He survived the Genocide in 1915 at the age of 8 when the Turkish gendarmes grabbed all the young boys of the village ages 5 to 10 and threw them into a pile on the sandy beach of the shores of the Euphrates River and starting jabbing them with their swords and bayonets. Fortunately, they only nipped his cheek and his grandmother later found him and nursed him back to health.
Thursday, April 9, 2015
Born into an affluent German Jewish family, Henry Morgenthau, Sr. was raised in New York, where he attended school and received his training as an attorney at Columbia. An early supporter of Woodrow Wilson, Morgenthau was tapped by the then newly-elected president to become the United States Ambassador for the Ottoman Empire.

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