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Tuesday, March 7, 2017
In the collective memory, the February Revolution has faded or been mixed with the October Revolution, which happened eight months later and defined the trajectory of the Russian history for the next 70 years. However, the memory of the February Revolution is preserved in several eyewitness testimonies to the Holocaust in the Visual History Archive.
Tuesday, March 7, 2017
English Translation of testimony clip: “The February Revolution, - that’s how I perceived it being a girl, - was a celebration. It was a fraternization! It was a jubilation! The bonds of an old order were broken: [before] you were not allowed to do this and that. If you were a nobleman, you were allowed to do everything, but if you were a burgess, you were deprived of everything. There were a lot of ties and bonds. But [the Revolution], it was such a liberation and joy! [People] were fraternizing!”
Tuesday, March 7, 2017
English translation:
Tuesday, March 7, 2017
Solly Ganor (Henkind) was born in 1927 in Silute, Lithuania. In 1941, Solly with his family was incarcerated in Kaunas ghetto. In 1944, he was deported to Stutthof concentration camp and then to Kaufering Lager X and Dachau. Solly was liberated in 1945. His father, Heim Henkind, born in 1891 in Minsk, then Russian Empire (today Belarus), was a member of the Russian Social Democratic Labour Party (Men’sheviks), that was emerged after the division of the Party in two groups, Men’sheviks and Bol’sheviks.
Tuesday, March 7, 2017
On March 8, 1917 (February 23 in the Julian calendar), in Petrograd, then the capital of the Russian Empire (today St. Petersburg), the February Revolution began. It brought about many rights and freedoms of which Russian citizens had hitherto deprived. On April 2, 1917, the Pale of Settlement, a long-term restriction on Jewish residence in the Russian Empire, was abolished.