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Thursday, April 7, 2016
Once Emilie Garrigou-Kempton joined the team of USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research last month as academic relations and outreach officer, she began to realize the connections she already has to the Institute.Professor Armand Abecassis, who was recently interviewed for the Institute’s Testimonies from North Africa and the Middle East Collection, was her advisor in graduate school. And her husband’s distant relative, a Holocaust survivor, gave her testimony to USC Shoah Foundation years ago.
Thursday, October 6, 2016
Jiří Kocian started out using the Visual History Archive himself as a researcher. Now, he’s helping others discover testimony as the coordinator of the Malach Center for Visual History at Charles University in Prague.
Thursday, April 21, 2016
Every year, some of Angela Gottesburen’s high school seniors enter an essay contest held by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education. This year, the students are using testimony from USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive to help craft their responses.The 2016 prompt for the Midwest Center’s annual White Rose Student Essay Contest, open to 8th-12th graders, asks students to explore how one Jewish survivor was affected by the Nazis’ anti-Jewish propaganda.
Thursday, February 4, 2016
The first-ever Center Fellow at USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research returned “home” this month to conduct more interviews and work on indexing Cambodian testimonies.As the 2014-15 fellow, LeVine spent the spring 2015 semester in residence at the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research conducting research and participating in Center activities, and gave a public talk during her stay.
Monday, August 22, 2016
Kim Kerwin was one of a select group of teachers who participated in USC Shoah Foundation’s first three-day ITeach Institute in Michigan last week, and she walked away from the training inspired to incorporate testimony into her classes at St. Fabian Catholic School.
Tuesday, August 2, 2016
There are many Holocaust survivors who wrote after the war about their experiences, but Beatrice Mousli Bennett is focusing her attention on writers who are far less studied: those who continued to write even while they faced occupation, deportations and oppression in the throes of World War II. Bennett is the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research’s 2016 Faculty Summer Research Fellow. The fellowship provides support for a USC faculty member to conduct research in the Visual History Archive while in residence at the Center for one month.
Thursday, August 25, 2016
Mélanie Péron discovered the power of personal stories the first time she was assigned to teach the Holocaust at the University of Pennsylvania. She had started out the course just trying to teach dry historical facts, and it didn’t go very well. “It was one of the hardest experiences ever,” Péron said. “It was horrendous. My students were bored, I was scared. Finally I said, ‘We’re going to do something else.’”
Tuesday, February 9, 2016
Andrea van Noord gave her students a small taste of her job of an indexer, and in return, they offered a thoughtful new perspective on the Visual History Archive.
Monday, April 4, 2016
Postgraduate scholar Yuri Radchenko is focusing his research on the Holocaust in Ukraine – something he says he would have trouble doing if he didn’t have the Visual History Archive.
Friday, October 21, 2016
Arizona State University Professor Anna Holian visited USC on October 10 to give a lecture at the USC Max Kade Institute for Austrian-German-Swiss Studies. While she was here, she spent two days at USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research watching testimony for her new project on Jewish merchants in Munich and Frankfurt after World War II.
Thursday, June 30, 2016
USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive is a tool that allows genocide survivors to tell their stories. But it isn’t their words that summer research fellow Erin Mizrahi is interested in; it’s their silence. Mizrahi, a fifth-year Comparative Studies in Literature and Culture Ph.D. student at USC, is studying silence as a theoretical approach through two very different subjects: sexual assault in performance art and the Holocaust.
Friday, April 29, 2016
Last summer, social studies teacher Amy Mclaughlin-Hatch went on trip with the Holocaust and Jewish Resistance Teacher’s Program to Germany and Poland, visiting 42 sites significant in the Holocaust. Now, with the help of IWitness, she’s bringing this knowledge back to her high school students at Southeastern Regional Vocational High School in South Easton, Massachusetts.
Tuesday, October 11, 2016
Social studies teacher Molly Gale learned the ins and outs of IWitness at USC Shoah Foundation’s IWitness Summer Institute in Farmington Hills, Mich., this August. But what she appreciated most, she said, was the time she was given to delve deeply into IWitness and work on her own lesson plans before the training was even over. “Usually [at teacher training workshops] they just throw information at you, but here they presented it and then we had hours to work,” she said. By the end of the three-day workshop, “I had practical lessons written and left ready to roll.”
Friday, June 10, 2016
People who want to visit the places where the Holocaust happened have many options: Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, the Shoes on the Danube Memorial in Budapest, former ghettos, or the fields of Babi Yar, to name a few.But when it comes to the Armenian Genocide, former sites of the massacres and killings are so difficult to access most people have never been there or even seen them in pictures.That’s what photographer Bardig Kouyoumdjian attempted to change with his book Deir-Zor: On the trail of the Armenian Genocide of 1915.
Tuesday, January 19, 2016
It’s been three and a half years since Kosal Path’s Institute Fellowship at USC Shoah Foundation. Looking back, he says the fellowship ended up changing his life.
Thursday, February 18, 2016
Anasheh Tahmasian may not work in genocide awareness anymore, but she still carries what she learned during her time as a USC Shoah Foundation intern with her.Tahmasian, now an on-call marketing research consultant at Lieberman Research Worldwide, interned for the Institute for seven months in 2013, before graduating from USC with a degree in psychology in December 2013.At USC Shoah Foundation, Tahmasian did everything from posting on social media to helping with the research department to finding new videos.
Monday, January 25, 2016
What started out as a curious journey across the hall at Leavey Library turned into one of Marina Kay’s most passionate endeavors at USC.Kay, currently a senior international relations major, was working on USC’s Interlibrary Loan & Document Delivery team at Leavey Library in summer 2014 when she became curious about one particular office that she always passed by in the library – USC Shoah Foundation. She had always been interested in learning about the Holocaust, so one day she decided to go inside, and asked if she could intern or volunteer.
Monday, June 6, 2016
 Despite the fact that Aida Fogel grew up in Caracas, Venezuela, she was familiar with USC Shoah Foundation from an early age. A family friend worked with the Institute to interview survivors in Venezuela, and two of Fogel’s great-aunts gave testimony. Though her grandmother didn’t give testimony, she was an Auschwitz survivor herself.
Thursday, March 24, 2016
Ten years ago, Sanne van Heijst was working on developing teaching materials at the museum of Konzentrationslager Herzogenbusch, or Vught, a former concentration camp in the Netherlands. Van Heijst was looking for a way to get through to the students who would visit the museum.“I was looking for a common thread that would help pupils to make a connection between the different groups of prisoners from the camp and the different events that happened,” she said.
Monday, March 7, 2016
In her testimony in the Visual History Archive, Lisa Slater describes seeing a cattle car filled with Jewish men, women and children during the Holocaust– but unlike most survivors in the archive who remember seeing such a thing, she was never forced inside it.Slater is one of the few “witnesses” to the Holocaust who gave testimony to USC Shoah Foundation – people who were not persecuted, nor acted as rescuers or aid-providers, but merely observed the events of the Holocaust unfolding around them.
Monday, April 11, 2016
When Jennifer Binley entered college, she knew she was interested in dedicating herself to finding a way to stop mass atrocities around the world. The international relations major quickly joined USC STAND, an anti-genocide club she eventually became president of, and began interning at USC Shoah Foundation.“I found the interests of [USC STAND] often correlate to the events and goals of USC Shoah Foundation,” Binley said of her dedication to both organizations.
Friday, November 11, 2016
Danish historian Therkel Straede spent three days at USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research this week watching testimonies in an attempt to understand the truth about one of the most gruesome and taboo aspects of the Holocaust: cannibalism in the Nazi concentration camps.
Thursday, August 4, 2016
The staff of the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research had a dilemma on their hands. They could only choose one applicant to award the 2016 Graduate Summer Research Fellowship – but they couldn’t bring themselves to turn away their runner-up, Piotr Florczyk, because his proposal was so fascinating. It’s easy to see why. Florczyk, a PhD candidate in the USC Literature and Creative Writing program, intends to write poetry inspired by the testimonies of Polish Holocaust survivors in the archive.
Wednesday, June 15, 2016
Priscilla Hefley, a master’s student in the USC School of Social Work, knew she wanted to do research on trauma and its impact on the brain, but she had no idea where to start – until her professor Hazel Atuel suggested she look in USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive.
Wednesday, July 13, 2016
By Mahima Verma Nárcisz Vida always had a desire to help individuals who faced discrimination through the power of education. Today, Vida empowers students and teachers to combat hatred and stand against intolerance through testimony. Vida leads the education programs at Zachor Foundation for Social Remembrance in Budapest, Hungary. She started as a volunteer working closely with Zachor Foundation founder and director, Andrea Szőnyi, who is also USC Shoah Foundation’s international training consultant in Hungary,
Thursday, August 11, 2016
After Pamela Applebaum attended USC Shoah Foundation’s Ambassadors for Humanity gala in Detroit last year, she knew the Institute was something she wanted to be a part of.  “We immediately embraced the importance of ensuring the vital preservation of the darkest chapter in Jewish history with the enduring vision of connecting the next generation to a modern perspective of this past to better grapple with today’s complicated, challenging, and belligerent environment,” she said.
Wednesday, March 9, 2016
In his testimony for the Armenian Film Foundation, recorded in 2012, Armenian Genocide survivor Sebooh Gertmenian describes how he survived the genocide as a three year old with the help of his mother.The interviewer marvels at his mother’s strength, how she was able to keep her children alive on a forced march through the desert after her husband and older child had been murdered. Gertmenian, perhaps having never thought of his mother in this way before, says with wonder, “She must have been an angel.”
Wednesday, May 18, 2016
Aliza Caplan is about to graduate from the University of Pennsylvania, but it wasn’t until her final semester of her undergraduate studies that she took one of her favorite courses: “Witnessing, Remembering, and Writing the Holocaust” with Professor Liliane Weissberg.
Thursday, August 18, 2016
Three years ago, Lacey Schauwecker became interested in the Guatemalan Genocide through work she was doing with USC Shoah Foundation. Now, Schauwecker is back for four weeks as a 2016 Summer Graduate Research Fellow at the Center for Advanced Genocide Research utilizing the Institute’s Guatemalan testimonies.
Monday, March 28, 2016
When Zach Larkin was 13, he sat down with his great-grandfather to interview and record his stories about his experiences as a Hungarian Jew during the Holocaust. Larkin didn’t know that this would begin his journey researching this time period and interacting with survivor testimony.“[My great-grandfather] was a Holocaust survivor who didn’t like to talk about his experience with anyone, not even USC Shoah Foundation,” Larkin said. “But when I was 13, for some reason he talked to me and let me interview him and told me about his experience in Budapest in 1944.”

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