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Thursday, June 27, 2019
Lee Liberman to Chair Board of Councilors; Joel Citron Named Vice Chair. Liberman, a citizen of Australia, is the Institute’s first chair based outside of the United States. She and Citron have each dedicated many years to the USC Shoah Foundation, both serving on the Executive Committee of its Board of Councilors.
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research organized a symposium in the Fall to honor the work of leading Holocaust scholar David Cesarani from Great Britain, who died just weeks after being named by the USC Shoah Foundation the inaugural Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar in Residence. These are the remarks made by Rob Rozett at the event.
Wednesday, January 27, 2016
As the first anniversary of my life-changing trip to Poland is upon me, I take time to reflect on the impact that trip has made on me both personally and professionally.  I have learned so much from my experiences as a teacher in USC Shoah Foundation’s and Discovery Education’s Auschwitz: The Past is Present program.
Tuesday, October 3, 2017
Historian and filmmaker Christian Delage gave a public lecture at the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research about different forms of testimony — in war crimes trials, oral history repositories, and documentary - and his recent project collecting interviews about the November 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris.
Thursday, December 14, 2017
One feature of her research is examining the role of the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive interviews in the construction of social memory of the Holocaust in the Soviet Jewish community and more widely in the post-Soviet society. During her month-long residency at the Center, Rebrova examined some of the USC Shoah Foundation’s institutional records about the selection, training, and methodology of interviewers in Russia.
Wednesday, December 13, 2017
Renowned anthropologist Alexander Hinton gave a public lecture at the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research about his new book Man or Monster? The Trial of a Khmer Rouge Torturer, which attempts to offer a deeper understanding of Comrade Duch, the notorious head of the S-21 prison, a notorious facility where between 12,000 and 20,000 people were detained, tortured, and ultimately murdered by the Khmer Rouge.
Monday, May 7, 2018
In 2003, I and others were preparing for the opening of the Kigali Genocide Memorial to commemorate the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda when a volunteer data collector emptied the contents of a brown manila envelope onto my desk. There on top of the pile of papers and photos was a photo of two little girls.
Tuesday, June 4, 2019
In the predawn hours of June 6, 1944, a massive armada of Allied ships set sail across the English Channel toward Normandy, France, in what would become the largest amphibious attack in world history. Many liberators shared their D-Day stories with USC Shoah Foundation.
Monday, July 8, 2019
Kor and her twin sister endured cruel experiments under the sadistic hand of Dr. Josef Mengele. Kor later sparked controversy by publicly forgiving the Nazis. Her Dimensions in Testimony interview -- an interactive biography produced by USC Shoah Foundation -- is on permanent display at the Holocaust museum she founded in Indiana.
Monday, August 26, 2013
International educators discuss testimony-based educationA conversation with Werner Dreier, Alice Herscovitch, and Karen PolakBy Kori Street
Tuesday, September 16, 2014
Rescue is a crucial topic in understanding genocide survival and appreciating the difficult choices that people make in extreme circumstances. Although many stories of survival during the Holocaust are due to unexplained and unexplainable circumstances, there are also numerous accounts of individual and group acts of aid and rescue that contributed to the survival of thousands of Jewish people.
Saturday, April 29, 2017
Four of the five Center Summer 2016 research fellows gathered to publicly present and discuss their research using the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive (VHA).
Thursday, May 4, 2017
Marisa Fox-Bevilacqua grew up never knowing that her mother was a Holocaust survivor. That is, until a series of discoveries after her mother’s death led her to the truth: her mother had survived Gabersdorf, a slave labor camp for Jewish girls and young women, for four and a half years – and had never said a word about it.
Tuesday, January 22, 2019
“Who Will Write Our History” tells how ghetto inhabitant Emanuel Ringelblum, a historian, spearheaded an effort to collect what became one of the most important caches of eyewitness accounts to survive World War II. USC Shoah Foundation is a screening-event partner.
Wednesday, August 24, 2016
This collection of photos offers a rare glimpse of an outdoor Jewish ghetto in the countryside – specifically in Kutno, Poland. The images depict a form of ghetto that was actually more common, but far less known, than the urban settings (i.e. Warsaw Ghetto) that are cemented in the public imagination.
Friday, May 5, 2017
I had interviewed dozens of Gabersdorf survivors, discovered there had been 10 other women’s slave labor camps in Trutnov, then Trautenau, Sudetenland and that the 5,000 Polish Jewish women trafficked to Trutnov were among the first to be imprisoned in Nazi camps and the last to be liberated, on May 8th--9th, 1945. Didn’t they deserve to be honored, too?
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research organized a symposium in the Fall to honor the work of leading Holocaust scholar David Cesarani from Great Britain, who died just weeks after being named by the USC Shoah Foundation the inaugural Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar in Residence. These are the remarks made by David Silberklang at the event.

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