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Displaying 1 - 15 of 15 results
Wednesday, July 10, 2013
Henri Deutsch, a jewish survivor, who along with his family was rescued by Aristides de Sousa Mendes, recalls the Portuguese diplomat. Sousa Mendes, against orders from the Portuguese government, issued an estimated 30,000 travel visas to people escaping Nazi-occupied France in 1940.
Friday, May 17, 2013
Raphaël Burgel est né le 1er décembre 1914 à Tours. Sa famille s’installe à Paris où elle demeure jusqu’en 1927, avant de déménager à Villennes (Seine-et-Oise). Ouvrier métallurgiste, il rejoint la zone non occupée en janvier 1941. Il est arrêté par la police allemande alors qu’il tente de quitter la France pour l’Espagne. Il parvient toutefois à dissimuler ses origines juives et il est déporté en tant que résistant à Buchenwald, en juin 1943. Après un rapide transit par le camp de Maidanek, il est transféré à Auschwitz où il travaille dans une scierie.
Friday, August 23, 2013
Marthe Cohn-Hoffnung remembers the liberation of Paris, France, in 1944, where she was living under false identity. She especially recalls the emotional response on the part of the French people upon seeing the French 2nd armored division, led by General Charles de Gaulle, march into Paris first. The United States armed forces followed shortly thereafter.
Tuesday, April 30, 2013
Kurt describes liberating survivors of a death march in May 1945, in Volary, Czechoslovakia, including his first encounter with his future wife, Gerda. Kurt Klein was born July 2, 1920, in Walldorf, Germany. As the Nazi persecution of German Jews intensified, Kurt’s parents decided to send him and his siblings to live with distant relatives in Buffalo, New York, where he worked in various jobs, including the printing business, trying to raise enough money to bring his parents to the United States. Kurt was drafted into the United States Army in 1943.
Friday, June 7, 2013
Born in Coburg, Germany, on Nov 17, 1923, Harry Nomburg fled from Germany to the United Kingdom and fought with the British armed forces. He was attached as an interpreter to Commando Force. In this clip, Harry recalls landing on Normandy on D-Day, June 6.
Friday, October 18, 2013
Ernest James speaks of his participation as a United States soldier in the battle for Aachen, Germany, in October 1944. He explains how the United States armed forces surrounded Aachen and forced the German armed forces to surrender. It was October 21, 1944.  
Wednesday, August 21, 2013
Belinna Aronovich remembers the liberation of her hometown, Husi, when the Soviet armed forces invaded Romania in 1944. She describes her reaction to the retreat of the German army as well as her own feelings upon seeing Soviet soldiers occupy her town.
Thursday, September 12, 2013
Kurt Messerschmidt, a cantor, reflects on the observance of Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, in the Theresienstadt ghetto, Czechoslovakia, in 1944. He describes the significance of the concluding service of Yom Kippur, the Neilah service (closing of the gates) followed by the long sounding of the shofar (ram’s horn).
Monday, April 29, 2013
Irene recounts her experience of being liberated by the British Army from the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany in April 1945. Irene Weiss was born Irene Traub on August 2, 1919, in Halmeu, a small Jewish community in Romania. In March 1944, Irene, her parents, and seven siblings were deported to the Szatmar ghetto in Transylvania where they stayed for two months. In June 1944, Irene was sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau where she was separated from her parents, who would perish in the gas chambers, and began work as a forced laborer.
Friday, February 1, 2013
This video focuses on the theme of diplomats and rescue and relates some of the best-known cases of aid provided by consulates and embassies including the efforts of Aristides de Sousa Mendes, Raoul Wallenberg, and Chiune Sugihara. Diplomats in countries throughout Europe helped Jews escape persecution by issuing visas and other travel paperwork that allowed Jews to flee Nazi-occupied territory. Featured in the video are the testimonies of Israel Kipen, Per Anger, and Henri Deutsch who recount their personal experiences of rescue during the Holocaust.
Tuesday, April 30, 2013
Charlotte shares her experience as a U.S. Army nurse who participated in the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp in Germany in May 1945. Charlotte Chaney was born Charlotte Ellner on October 15, 1921, in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. Charlotte was trained as a nurse and then volunteered for the Army Air Corps in 1944. That same year she married United States Navyman Bernard Chaney. In May 1945, Charlotte was sent to Europe as a part of the Red Cross, not knowing she was about to take part in the liberation of Dachau concentration camp.
Sunday, May 5, 2013
Anna helped to smuggle gunpowder collected from the factory where her sister worked to Sonderkommando prisoners at a crematorium in Auschwitz II-Birkenau. The Sonderkommando led a revolt that destroyed the crematorium, and almost all of them were killed along with Anna’s sister and three other female prisoners who helped to organize the uprising.
Sunday, May 5, 2013
Jewish Holocaust Survivor Morris talks about spending Rosh Hashanah—the holiday commemorating the start of the Jewish New Year—in a labor camp in Frankfurt an der Oder in 1944. He recalls pleading with the camp barber not to shave his hair, because it was Rosh Hashanah.
Tuesday, April 30, 2013
Martin relates his experience of being liberated from the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany in April 1945. Martin Aaron was born April 21, 1929, in Teresva, Czechoslovakia. Growing up in the nearby Jewish community of Sapanta, Romania, Martin recalls experiencing antisemitism, which intensified after Hungary annexed the area in 1940. In 1944, the Hungarians and Germans forced Martin, his parents, and five siblings to move into the Tacovo ghetto before they were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau.
Friday, November 1, 2013
November 2 marks the 70th anniversary of the mass deportation of the Karachai people, who Soviet authorities accused of having collaborated with the Germans during World War II. Over 70,000 Karachais were transported in cattle cars in deplorable conditions from the North Caucasus to Central Asia, beginning on November 2, 1943.