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Friday, June 6, 2014
On the 70th anniversary of D-Day, in which Allied troops landed on the Normandy coast in France, USC Shoah Foundation has published a new online exhibit featuring the testimonies of soldiers and witnesses who recall that historic day.
Thursday, December 5, 2013
Secondary school students across France are hard at work on their entries for the 2013-2014 National Contest on Resistance and Deportation – and many of them are drawing inspiration from USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive
Wednesday, February 5, 2014
USC Shoah Foundation’s online exhibit Born in the City that Became Auschwitz is now available in French, Italian, Russian, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Arabic, Polish and Czech. All versions are available here on the USC Shoah Foundation website.
Thursday, October 24, 2013
In between attending classes together and posing for pictures in front of Tommy Trojan, USC students and their families can get to know USC Shoah Foundation in a special exhibit at this year’s Trojan Family Weekend.
Tuesday, September 22, 2015
A new exhibit on the USC Shoah Foundation website takes a closer look at the stories of refugees during World War II. It is inspired by the current refugee crisis in Europe.
Thursday, April 24, 2014
Thursday marked the grand opening of the Blavatnik Archive Foundation's exhibit about Soviet Jewish soldiers during World War II presented by USC Shoah Foundation and USC Doheny Library.
Tuesday, April 30, 2013
Kurt describes liberating survivors of a death march in May 1945, in Volary, Czechoslovakia, including his first encounter with his future wife, Gerda. Kurt Klein was born July 2, 1920, in Walldorf, Germany. As the Nazi persecution of German Jews intensified, Kurt’s parents decided to send him and his siblings to live with distant relatives in Buffalo, New York, where he worked in various jobs, including the printing business, trying to raise enough money to bring his parents to the United States. Kurt was drafted into the United States Army in 1943.
Monday, January 28, 2013
The exhibit is part of UNESCO’s International Holocaust Remembrance Day 2013 activities; commemorated annually on January 27, the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, International Holocaust Remembrance Day pays tribute to the victims of the Holocaust.
Monday, April 29, 2013
Irene recounts her experience of being liberated by the British Army from the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany in April 1945. Irene Weiss was born Irene Traub on August 2, 1919, in Halmeu, a small Jewish community in Romania. In March 1944, Irene, her parents, and seven siblings were deported to the Szatmar ghetto in Transylvania where they stayed for two months. In June 1944, Irene was sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau where she was separated from her parents, who would perish in the gas chambers, and began work as a forced laborer.
Monday, April 29, 2013
Six Holocaust survivors: Fred Katz, Esther Gever, Jacob Wiener, Eva Abraham-Podietz, Robert Behr, and Herbert Karliner, recount their personal experiences during the Kristallnacht Pogrom and the events that followed.This video compilation was created by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum with footage from the USC Shoah Foundation Institute’s archive. (Running time: 21.35)
Tuesday, April 30, 2013
Charlotte shares her experience as a U.S. Army nurse who participated in the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp in Germany in May 1945. Charlotte Chaney was born Charlotte Ellner on October 15, 1921, in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. Charlotte was trained as a nurse and then volunteered for the Army Air Corps in 1944. That same year she married United States Navyman Bernard Chaney. In May 1945, Charlotte was sent to Europe as a part of the Red Cross, not knowing she was about to take part in the liberation of Dachau concentration camp.
Tuesday, April 30, 2013
Martin relates his experience of being liberated from the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany in April 1945. Martin Aaron was born April 21, 1929, in Teresva, Czechoslovakia. Growing up in the nearby Jewish community of Sapanta, Romania, Martin recalls experiencing antisemitism, which intensified after Hungary annexed the area in 1940. In 1944, the Hungarians and Germans forced Martin, his parents, and five siblings to move into the Tacovo ghetto before they were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau.

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