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Tuesday, October 13, 2015
Robert J. Aumann remembers the phone call notifying him he won the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, 2005. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for his contribution to the understanding of conflict through game-theory analysis at the University of Jerusalem in Israel.
Wednesday, April 22, 2015
In the spring of 1915, the Young Turk regime of the Ottoman began a genocide against its Armenian population under the cover of World War I. This minute-long excerpt features survivor Haroutune Aivazian.  He describes the horror his mother faced when a town crier in Marash, a city in Cilcia in South West Anatolia, called for the Armenians of the community to gather in a square just outside of the town for deportation. As his mother prepared for the journey, a local Turkish man warned the family that deportation meant death.
Friday, April 10, 2015
When Michael Hagopian made his first classic acclaimed documentary on the Armenian Genocide in 1975, nominated for two Emmys, he titled the film “The Forgotten Genocide.” Since then decades have passed and hundreds of publications in a variety of languages have been written on the subject. The Armenian Genocide has now taken its rightfully important place within the field of genocide studies. It is not a “forgotten genocide” anymore, despite the existence of a denialist State - Turkey, which has developed denialism into an Industry.
Wednesday, December 9, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation’s liaison in Poland, Monika Koszyńska coordinates the Visual History Archive access sites in Poland; represents the Institute at conferences and seminars; organizes the Teaching with Testimony in the 21st Century training program for Polish educators; and coordinates fundraising and other outreach efforts. She is also on the staff of the Museum of the History of the Polish Jews’ education department, a Visual History Archive Access Site.
Friday, April 17, 2015
This brief clip reveals a number of significant points about the early stage of the Armenian Genocide (spring-summer 1915) in many areas. The first is that although one reads in memoirs and accounts of Armenians who were expecting “something bad to happen,” many, if not most, Armenian villagers believed that they were going to be relocated in a peaceful manner.
Friday, April 3, 2015
After the disastrous Balkan wars of 1912-13, the Turks lost most of their European possessions. To dilute the Armenian presence and create a homogenous Turkish and Muslim population that would unequivocally support the Turkish state, the Young Turks decided on a policy of resettling Muslim refugees from the Balkan wars in Armenian areas and deporting the indigenous population.  These early measures led to the impoverishment and death of thousands; then came the First World War with Turkey taking the side of Germany against Russia and its allies.
Friday, August 14, 2015
With the 2015 Ambassadors for Humanity Gala in Detroit just a month away, local students experienced IWitness in their own backyard, at the Henry Ford Museum.
Tuesday, April 7, 2015
Historians continue to debate the extent of German responsibility for the Armenian Genocide in 1915. The Ottoman Empire was an ally of Germany during WWI (1914- 1918). During the war, Germany was blamed for the Armenian Genocide. Historian Arnold Toynbee in his widely read pamphlet Armenian Atrocities published in 1915 “indicted” Germany for what he called a “shameful and terrible page of modern history” in Armenia.
Wednesday, April 15, 2015
The murder of extended families, the targeting of community leaders, the critical role of eyewitnesses--each of these factors surfaces in Haigas Bonapart’s interview. These tactics are all too familiar to those of us who study the crime of genocide and the strategies employed by its perpetrators. By destroying communal ties and eliminating those individuals who might rally a group in self-defense, civilians under systematic assault are made much more vulnerable to isolation and mass violence.
Tuesday, June 16, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation Executive Director Stephen Smith joined 25 educators and researchers from Israel and Europe for an expert seminar today on Holocaust education in the 21st century.
Friday, March 6, 2015
On March 8, 2015 there will be events all over the world celebrating the achievements of women for International Women’s Day. This year’s theme Make it Happen encourages action for advancing women’s rights and also recognizing the incredible and courageous work women do in various industries throughout the world.
Wednesday, April 15, 2015
Dirouhi Haigas was a young Turkish-Armenian girl of 7 when she and her family were abruptly uprooted from their home and deported on foot to the southern desert. A native of Konya, Turkey, she had lived an idyllic life up to that time with her parents, grandparents, aunt, and uncles. Her father was in the family business as a leather merchant, and her uncles were amateur musicians who loved nothing more than to get together with friends and relatives to enjoy folk music and dancing.  This life came to an abrupt end with the outbreak of World War I.
Monday, February 2, 2015
As the number of Holocaust survivors dwindles, it falls to future generations to ensure their stories remain vibrant and strong.With that in mind, USC Shoah Foundation – The Institute for Visual History and Education brought groups of students and teachers from around the world this week to Poland to not only participate in Tuesday’s 70th anniversary commemoration of the liberation of the Auschwitz camp, but to give them the a deeper understanding of the horrors of World War II.
Thursday, April 23, 2015
In 1968, filmmaker J. Michael Hagopian received a phone call as he describes in this clip, from a German, who had apparently been stationed in a medical corps in the Ottoman Empire in 1915/1916 and witnessed what happened to Armenians. Michael had not heard of this person before, but knew right away that this could be an important interview. Why?
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
Armin T. Wegner was in the German Sanitary Corps and was posted to Eastern Turkey during WWI.  There he was witness to the genocide of the Armenian people. Seeing the devastating consequences of the deportations he documented the genocide in photographs, keeping meticulous notes at great personal risk.Wegner was arrested for his covert documentation, but was able to smuggle his photographs back to Germany. These photographs were later used in German Court as evidence that genocide had indeed taken place in Eastern Anatolia against the Armenian people.
Tuesday, November 17, 2015
Shandler’s talk will focus on Yiddish performances of Holocaust survivors in the Visual History Archive of USC Shoah Foundation.
Friday, April 17, 2015
Wolf Dieter Bihl is a famous Austrian historian, with a number of published works on Austria-Hungary and the First World War. In this clip, he is touching upon two important issues pertaining to the history of the Armenian Genocide. The first is his assertion that representatives of the allies of the Ottoman Empire during the war, i.e. that other Central Powers, and Germany and Austria-Hungary in particular, reported extensively in their internal, confidential correspondence that what the Young Turk government was up to was actually a determined attempt to exterminate the Armenian race.
Monday, June 29, 2015
Attendees can learn about IWitness on the expo floor at the Extreme Networks booth through Wednesday.
Friday, November 13, 2015
Special education teacher Tony Cole introduced teachers to IWitness at an orientation for University College London (UCL)’s Beacon School in Holocaust Education program on Oct. 27.
Friday, February 6, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation Executive Director Stephen Smith will speak at the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center’s Armenian Genocide symposium this Sunday, Feb. 8.
Tuesday, March 3, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation is pleased to provide closed captioning for IWitness activities and the IWitness Video Challenge, thanks to a grant from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation.
Thursday, May 14, 2015
The Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicago will soon incorporate IWitness into some of their programs following workshops with students and program leaders last week.
Monday, October 19, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation and Facing History and Ourselves have established a partnership in order to develop meaningful and engaging learning resources centered on Holocaust survivor testimonies.
Friday, April 3, 2015
Three IWitness educators have authored an article about IWitness for the National Council for the Social Studies’ journal Social Education.
Tuesday, April 7, 2015
Sam Kadorian was born in 1907 in Hussenig, a small village in the province of Kharpert, in the eastern plains of Anatolia. He survived the Genocide in 1915 at the age of 8 when the Turkish gendarmes grabbed all the young boys of the village ages 5 to 10 and threw them into a pile on the sandy beach of the shores of the Euphrates River and starting jabbing them with their swords and bayonets. Fortunately, they only nipped his cheek and his grandmother later found him and nursed him back to health.
Friday, November 6, 2015
Kabera and his film Intore will receive the International Family Film Festival (IFFF)’s 2015 Humanitarian Award in Hollywood on Sunday, Nov. 8.
Tuesday, April 14, 2015
Haig Baronian’s testimony touches on two important and interrelated dimensions of the Armenian Genocide: the gendered nature of forms and patterns of violence, and the Islamization and incorporation of Armenian women and children into Muslim households and society.
Wednesday, January 7, 2015
A testimony-based audiovisual resource for educators in Czech Republic, Poland and Hungary is now available online.
Monday, November 16, 2015
Paris. The way we think of that beautiful city has changed. That's what they want. They want us to think about things differently, to use Paris as a symbol of bloodshed and fear, not the one we know and love of liberty and culture. That is the nature of extremism: It tries to change who we are, how we see the world, to change our habits and our patterns of thought, to enjoy our freedoms less, to exert control.
Tuesday, April 7, 2015
Wolf Gruner, director of USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research, will spend two months in residence at the Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Jewish Studies this summer researching Jewish resistance against the Nazis.

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