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Tuesday, June 13, 2017
Los Angeles, June 13, 2017 – A group of students from Chicago who inspired their fellow students to embrace each other’s unique identity has won the 2017 IWitness Video Challenge sponsored by USC Shoah Foundation.
Monday, January 9, 2017
The foundation “Remembrance, Responsibility and Future” (German acronym EVZ) is hosting an international workshop on the use of Holocaust survivor testimonies in education January 9-11.
Wednesday, April 19, 2017
Now in its fourth year, the Margee and Douglas Greenberg Research Fellowship is awarded to one advanced standing Ph.D. candidate each year who will use the Visual History Archive as a key component of their dissertation research.
Tuesday, July 25, 2017
Acclaimed writer and Holocaust historian Deborah Lipstadt will be a special guest at an evening of conversation with USC Shoah Foundation at Aspen Jewish Community Center Wednesday, August 9 at 5 p.m. The program is complimentary and open to the public. Lipstadt will open the evening with remarks about Holocaust denial and its role in global antisemitism.
Thursday, April 6, 2017
Amann will research the women who participated in the Nuremberg Trials and other major criminal trials in the aftermath of World War II.
Monday, July 10, 2017
Acadia Grantham decided to take action against bullying in her IWitness Video Challenge entry, “Silence,” which won second place in the 2017 national contest. The IWitness Video Challenge asks students to submit short videos to show how they were inspired by testimony to make positive choices and create value in their community. The contest is open to middle and high school students across the United States and Canada (except Quebec). 
Monday, July 17, 2017
Shayna Kantor turned her passion for American Sign Language into her third-place winning IWitness Video Challenge project.
Thursday, May 11, 2017
USC Shoah Foundation is saddened to learn of the passing of Holocaust survivor Curt Lowens, a wartime hero who became a well-known character actor when he moved to the United States. He was 91. Born Curt Lowenstein on Nov. 17, 1925 in Germany, Lowen and his family had planned to emigrate to the United States as World War II was starting, but they were stopped from leaving the Netherlands when the Germans invaded that country. He was briefly deported to the Westerbork concentration camp in 1943, but he was released because of his father’s business connections.
Friday, February 24, 2017
The sixth week of 100 Days to Inspire Respect will get students thinking about intolerance and how to counter it through acceptance and empathy.
Thursday, February 9, 2017
Middle school can be complicated. As students, we are preparing to go into high school, making new friends, going to our first dances, and unfortunately for too many of us having to deal with constant bullying. While there are those who might be the perpetrators and victims, there are many of us who are the bystanders and it is our duty to stand up against any form of discrimination. I learned through Holocaust survivor testimony that there are many ways to stand up for others.
Thursday, February 23, 2017
My friends Allison (Ally) Vandal, Maya Montell and I worked with our fabulous teacher, Emily Bengels, to create a group called Poet’s Undercover Guild (PUG). With this “guild”, we drew inspiration from testimony found in USC Shoah Foundation’s educational platform, IWitness to create our winning video “A Community of Poetry.”
Thursday, December 7, 2017
A public lecture by Diane Marie Amann (University of Georgia School of Law & PhD candidate in Law, Universiteit Leiden, the Netherlands) 2017-2018 Breslauer, Rutman and Anderson Research Fellow
Tuesday, March 28, 2017
Through testimony of genocide survivors from the Visual History Archive, it is possible to examine how stereotypes manifest into society and fuel prejudice.
Tuesday, July 25, 2017
Lipstadt will be a special guest at an evening of conversation with USC Shoah Foundation at Aspen Jewish Community Center Wednesday, August 9 at 5 p.m. The program is complimentary and open to the public.
Monday, August 28, 2017
Zelizer will use her fellowship to teach a Ph.D. research seminar entitled “Mediating War and Genocide Through Visual Memory.”
Friday, April 21, 2017
At this time of remembrance, I hope I am incorrect in thinking that public awareness of the Shoah is eroding. Information about this act of atrocity is still proliferating, so unawareness clearly cannot be attributed to absent knowledge. There is, in fact, an incredible amount of knowledge … and a growing reluctance to understand it.
Wednesday, May 3, 2017
Drag Queen, talented businessman and my icon RuPaul once stated, “If you can’t love yourself, how in the hell are you going to love somebody else?”
Thursday, January 12, 2017
A lecture by Katja Schatte (University of Washington) 2016-2017 Margee and Douglas Greenberg Research Fellow
Tuesday, January 17, 2017
USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research Director Wolf Gruner will speak on a panel about the seminal Nazi propaganda film Triumph of the Will at a screening of the film at USC School of Cinematic Arts on Thursday, Jan. 19 at 7 p.m.
Thursday, March 9, 2017
Katja Schatte, USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research’s 2016-17 Greenberg Research Fellow, shared some of the discoveries she’s made in the Visual History Archive at her public lecture on March 7.
Thursday, March 16, 2017
The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research offers fellowships to support USC undergraduate students, graduate students, and USC faculty in conducting summer research using testimonies from the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive and/or other unique USC collections and resources. This event features four of the Center's five Summer 2016 research fellows from a variety of disciplines who will share their research and reflect on the use and value of testimonies in their projects.
Thursday, March 23, 2017
This lecture will discuss how the East Galician town of Buczacz was transformed from a site of coexistence, where Poles, Ukrainians, and Jews had lived side-by-side for centuries, into a site of genocide. Between 1941, when the Germans conquered the region, and 1944, when the Soviets liberated it, the entire Jewish population of Buczacz was murdered by the Nazis, with ample help from local Ukrainians, who then also ethnically cleansed the region of the Polish population. What were the reasons for this instance of communal violence, what were its dynamics, and why has it been erased from the local memory?
Monday, April 3, 2017
A public lecture by Alexander Korb (University of Leicester)2016-2017 Center Research Fellow                  
Tuesday, August 1, 2017
A public lecture by the 2017-2018 Research Week team Lorena Ávila (Centro Internacional de Toledo para la Paz, Colombia) Daniela Gleizer (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México) Emmanuel Kahan (Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina) Nancy Nichols (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile) Yael Siman (Universidad Iberoamericana, México) Susana Sosenski (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México) Alejandra Morales Stekel (Director, Interactive Jewish Museum of Chile, Chile)
Saturday, September 2, 2017
The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research and the USC Center for Visual Anthropology present: A public lecture by Alexander Laban Hinton (Rutgers University, Newark)
Saturday, September 2, 2017
A public lecture by Irina Rebrova (Technische Universität Berlin) 2017-2018 Margee and Douglas Greenberg Research Fellow
Monday, December 11, 2017
A public lecture by Jennie Burnet (Georgia State University)
Thursday, December 14, 2017
A public lecture by Philippe Sands (University College London) Introduction by Prof. Hannah Garry (Director of USC Gould International Human Rights Clinic)
Wednesday, March 15, 2017
USC Shoah Foundation's free educational website IWitness will host a Social Studies Twitter Chat #SSChat on Monday, April 3, 2017 at 4pm PT/7pm ET. Join @USCIWitness for a discussion on teaching about genocide with survivor and eyewitness testimony for Genocide Awareness Month.
Monday, February 13, 2017
In her public lecture on Feb. 9 at USC, Walch outlined the process by which Jews in Berlin lost their rights, access to public spaces, ability to move freely, and finally their own homes, from 1933-38. Throughout her talk, Walch referred to the testimonies in the Visual History Archive.

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