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Friday, May 6, 2016
Denise Paluch had been to two concentration camps by the time she was four, when she was smuggled out and kept hidden with a false identity for years in occupied France. For a long time, she did not know what became of her parents and for over 50 years, she wondered what had happened to them and hoped against hope that they were still alive. Years later, the youngest of her four children, Gaby Eirew, has researched and made a free, video-recording question-prompting app to help all parents leave loving messages, information and support for their children for use after death.
Monday, September 26, 2016
Coinciding with the 75th anniversary of the Babi Yar massacre in Ukraine, USC Shoah Foundation has published a new IWitness activity about Babi Yar and has begun leading a brand-new IWalk at the historic site in Kiev.
Monday, February 13, 2017
I recently was an expert witness from October 11-13, 2016, at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) in Phnom Penh, the so-called Khmer Rouge Tribunal that was established in 2001. When I mention this to colleagues, a typical response is, “That’s still going on?”  Indeed. Many forget the train that runs direct from USC to Long Beach takes you to the largest concentration of Cambodian survivors in the United States, where elders make daily offerings to ancestors in their homes or Buddhist temples.
Thursday, March 23, 2017
Join USC Shoah Foundation, Prensa Comunitaria, Movimiento plurinacional Maya Guatemalteco & FilmRise for a special advanced screening of Finding Oscar
Tuesday, September 6, 2016
Echoes and Reflections, a Holocaust education partnership program of USC Shoah Foundation, Anti-Defamation League and Yad Vashem, published a new lesson dedicated to teaching students about antisemitism as it exists in the world today.
Thursday, May 4, 2017
Marisa Fox-Bevilacqua grew up never knowing that her mother was a Holocaust survivor. That is, until a series of discoveries after her mother’s death led her to the truth: her mother had survived Gabersdorf, a slave labor camp for Jewish girls and young women, for four and a half years – and had never said a word about it.
Tuesday, December 1, 2015
If you’ve ever watched genocide survivor testimony from the Visual History Archive and it spurned you to wonder what you can do to help prevent acts of intolerance and inhumanity, USC Shoah Foundation has an opportunity for you this holiday season.
Tuesday, March 24, 2015
The Holocaust collection in USC Shoah Foundation's Visual History Archive contains nearly 53,000 testimonies; however, only a mere six of those testimonies are from survivors who were persecuted by the Nazis for being gay: one in English, three in German, one in French, and one in Dutch. There are other gay survivors we have in the Archive, but they were persecuted by the Nazis for the greater sin of being Jewish; Gad Beck being one of them. The meager number says a lot about the history of the gay men who lived through the Nazi regime and who came out the other end willing and unafraid to speak about their lives.
Friday, April 24, 2015
In this short clip Harry Kurkjian recalls Armenians who were about to be killed crying out in despair, “Where are you God?”  “Why are you punishing us?”  As the first nation to convert to Christianity in 301 AD, the events of 1915 raised a fundamental theological problem for Armenians.  If God is good and all-powerful, why was he not intervening on their behalf?  The problem of theodicy, as theologians refer to it, is an issue that surfaces in nearly every genocide, driving some people to completely abandon faith in God.  Indeed, the “God is Dead” movement arose after the Holocaust as Jewis
Friday, October 11, 2019
Join Vision & Voices for a presentation by documentarians and journalists who will describe the challenges they face as women in places of conflict, and share how visual media can be maximized to create change.
Friday, March 25, 2016
Never forget. Never again. These are common phrases used in Holocaust and genocide education. These are important statements especially when they evoke the real reason to study, learn, and teach about genocide. We must bring this content to students to empower them and encourage them to see beyond themselves. If done right, students become aware of the steps that lead to such atrocities. Teaching about genocide is the only way to have a lasting impact on our students, to affect their worldview, to help them understand that they can make a difference.
Friday, June 1, 2018
UNESCO’s push is part of a wider effort to address rising incidents of antisemitic events, which in recent years have ranged from online hate speech to physical violence.
Wednesday, April 10, 2019
On the day of the IWalk launch, 35 teachers in Philadelphia were trained on how to use the new app, which guides users through a plaza that memorializes the Holocaust.
Tuesday, January 22, 2019
“Who Will Write Our History” tells how ghetto inhabitant Emanuel Ringelblum, a historian, spearheaded an effort to collect what became one of the most important caches of eyewitness accounts to survive World War II. USC Shoah Foundation is a screening-event partner.
Wednesday, April 29, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation and Discovery Education will host an interactive virtual experience for middle- and high-school students worldwide to provide a deeper understanding of the Holocaust.
Thursday, March 31, 2016
USC Shoah Foundation partner Echoes and Reflections is launching a three-week online professional development webinar series for educators on Tuesday, April 4, 2016.
Tuesday, May 23, 2017
This program introduces learners to classroom-ready comprehensive print and online resources, sound pedagogy for teaching about the Holocaust and instructional pathways to help students learn about the complex history of the Holocaust.
Monday, October 10, 2016
Much like testimony shows how regimes have constructed borders; testimony demonstrates how individuals can construct bridges to connect with people of different beliefs and identities.
Friday, January 25, 2019
USC Shoah Foundation joined a Friday ceremony at a classroom in Cottbus, Germany that contributed 100 butterflies to the Butterfly Project, an international effort by schoolchildren to paint 1.5 million ceramic butterflies – one for every child murdered in the Holocaust.
Wednesday, June 14, 2017
Wolf Gruner, director of USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research, is in Oxford, Frankfurt and Berlin this week speaking about his research and his latest book on the persecution of Jews in Bohemia and Moravia during the Holocaust.
Monday, July 13, 2015
Educators from across the United States are convening at Anti-Defamation League headquarters in New York City today through Friday for an in-depth training on the resources of Echoes and Reflections.
Wednesday, July 30, 2014
USC Shoah Foundation – The Institute for Visual History and Education was founded to capture the voices, emotions and faces of those who suffered, yet miraculously survived the most heinous crime ever committed against humanity by humanity.The idea was to record individual and collective memories that would be preserved in perpetuity as a seminal educational tool to inform current and future generations that incitement, hate and violence against a person or a group can ultimately lead to death, genocide and ultimately extermination.
Friday, May 20, 2016
USC Shoah Foundation’s Armenian Genocide Collection is in the process of being transcribed, translated and subtitled in English, so that more viewers can watch the testimonies given in the survivors’ native languages.
Tuesday, June 2, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation is hosting new webinars for educators that aim to provide a more in-depth and interactive approach to learning how to teach with testimony.
Tuesday, October 29, 2013
USC Shoah Foundation’s director of education, Kori Street, will give two presentations this week in Montreal.
Tuesday, June 21, 2016
Initial evaluations from the pilot exhibition of USC Shoah Foundation's New Dimensions in Testimony – a groundbreaking project that enables audiences to have a "virtual conversation" with projected images of Holocaust survivors – is proving the new technology is a valuable tool to ensure future generations will be able to have personal interactive experiences with Holocaust survivors long into the future.
Friday, August 5, 2016
Aristides de Sousa Mendes was a Portuguese diplomat stationed in Bordeaux in the late 1930s who issued tens of thousands of visas to Jewish families, in direct violation of anti-Jewish laws instituted by Portugal’s fascist government at the time. For this act of resistance, Sousa Mendes faced trials and conviction, leaving him to live out the rest of his life in poverty and disgrace, and his 15 children scattered all over Europe and the U.S.
Monday, August 15, 2016
Poland’s new right-wing government wants to change the way children in that country learn about the Holocaust, casting Poles as only victims or heroes. In this new narration, the Polish people were always helping the weak, were good neighbors and cared about minorities.
Monday, February 10, 2014
I did not sleep well last night. It was not the kind of sleeplessness brought on by jet lag, stress or workload. It is best described as a kind of numbness that leaves one physically discharged, emotionally drained and deeply troubled. I just completed one the most sedentary days I’ve had in months, just sitting in a chair listening to one of the most intelligent, sophisticated, gentle, yet strong people I know tell me about his life.
Monday, June 30, 2014
As an intern at the USC Shoah Foundation and a student on the Problems Without Passports trip to Rwanda this summer, I’m more than familiar with the phrases “Never Forget” and “Never Again.” Sometimes the two seem like tired mottos. They’re valid and true, but oftentimes I think I miss the full impact of those few words.

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