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Thursday, June 20, 2013
During World War II, China was divided into three occupation zones among the Communist (CCP) forces led by Mao Tse-tung based in the north, the Nationalist (Kuomintang, KMT) forces led by Chiang Kai-shek based in the west, and the Japanese armed forces along the eastern seaboard. When the U.S. enters World War II on December 8, 1941, the United States becomes an ally of China.
Thursday, June 27, 2013
During World War II, China was divided into three occupation zones among the Communist (CCP) forces led by Mao Tse-tung based in the north, the Nationalist (Kuomintang, KMT) forces led by Chiang Kai-shek based in the west, and the Japanese armed forces along the eastern seaboard. When the U.S. enters World War II on December 8, 1941, the United States becomes an ally of China.
Thursday, July 11, 2013
Eva discusses the housing conditions her family had in the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China, and describes the food available to the ghetto inhabitants during the war.
Thursday, July 11, 2013
Eva discusses a ghetto pass policy enforced in the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China, during the war. Eva explains that she had to pass the ghetto checkpoint on a daily basis, as the school she attended was located outside of her living district. She talks about the impact from her encounters with Kanoh Ghoya, a Japanese official who was in charge of issuing the ghetto passes.
Monday, June 17, 2013
Berthold Katz talks about Kanoh Ghoya, a Japanese official responsible for giving monthly passes to Jews who were living in the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China and remembers his brutal treatment of the ghetto inhabitants.
Thursday, July 11, 2013
Henny talks about Kanoh Ghoya, a Japanese official responsible for issuing monthly passes to inhabitants of the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China. She notes that, aware of Goya's poor treatment of Jews, her parents decided to cease their attempts of leaving the ghetto.
Thursday, July 11, 2013
Berthold Katz talks about Kanoh Ghoya, a Japanese official responsible for giving monthly passes to Jews who were living in the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China, and remembers his brutal treatment of the ghetto inhabitants.
Thursday, July 11, 2013
Hans describes his encounters with a Japanese ghetto official, Kanoh Ghoya, while he was confined in the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China, during the war. He speaks of Ghoya's brutal treatment.
Monday, June 17, 2013
Judith describes the overcrowded housing conditions in the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China and discusses the general lack of privacy.
Thursday, July 11, 2013
Judith describes the overcrowded housing conditions in the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China, and discusses the general lack of privacy.
Thursday, June 20, 2013
On February 18, 1943, as a result of German pressure, Japanese authorities established a ghetto in the Hongkew neighborhood of Shanghai for stateless Jewish refugees who had arrived in Shanghai from Germany and German-occupied areas of Europe from 1937-1942. Kanoh Ghoya was a Japanese official responsible for giving monthly passes to Jewish refugees living in the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China during World War II. Ghoya was also known as the "King of the Jews" and was infamous for his inhumane treatment of ghetto inhabitants.
Thursday, June 27, 2013
On February 18, 1943, as a result of German pressure, Japanese authorities established a ghetto in the Hongkew neighborhood of Shanghai for stateless Jewish refugees who had arrived in Shanghai from Germany and German-occupied areas of Europe from 1937-1942. Kanoh Ghoya was a Japanese official responsible for giving monthly passes to Jewish refugees living in the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China during World War II. Ghoya was also known as the "King of the Jews" and was infamous for his inhumane treatment of ghetto inhabitants.
Monday, June 17, 2013
Eva describes the patterns of relationships among the inhabitants of the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China and focuses on the friendships she and her family had formed while retaining their humanity under difficult circumstances.
Thursday, July 11, 2013
Erika details the relationships she had with the local non-Jewish population, while living in the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China, during the war.
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
Over 17,000 Jews found refuge in Shanghai, China during World War II. In this section, interviewees discuss the patterns of relationships among people who interacted with one another in Shanghai, in the Hongkew Ghetto, and between the ghetto inhabitants, the local population, and the occupying Japanese authorities.  Relations between Jewish refugees of different cultures and from different regions and countries within the Shanghai community are described.
Thursday, June 27, 2013
Over 17,000 Jews found refuge in Shanghai, China, during World War II. In this section, interviewees discuss the patterns of relationships among people who interacted with one another in Shanghai, in the Hongkew Ghetto, and between the ghetto inhabitants, the local population, and the occupying Japanese authorities.  Relations between Jewish refugees of different cultures and from different regions and countries within the Shanghai community are described.
Wednesday, July 10, 2013
Hermine talks about the medical assistance she received from a local Chinese woman when she, a Jewish refugee from Germany, lived in the Hongkew Ghetto in Shanghai during the war.
Wednesday, July 10, 2013
Gert describes the community established by Jewish refugees from Germany upon their arrival in China on the eve of World War II. He remembers the living conditions in Shanghai and mentions the Hongkew Ghetto formed in the city by the occupying Japanese authorities in 1943.
Thursday, July 11, 2013
Eva describes various national backgrounds represented by Jewish refugees living in Shanghai, China, during the war. She briefly speaks of the cultural activities pursued by the Jewish refugees-inhabitants of the Hongkew ghetto.
Thursday, July 11, 2013
Eva describes the patterns of relationships among the inhabitants of the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China, and focuses on the friendships she and her family had formed while retaining their humanity under difficult circumstances.
Thursday, June 20, 2013
Over 17,000 Jews found refuge in Shanghai, China during World War II. In this section, interviewees talk about the process of adopting and adjusting to the cultural traits and social patterns in the new country and detail their daily life in China. They describe the living conditions and explain how they were able to maintain their Jewish identity while in Shanghai and in the Hongkew Ghetto, established by the occupying Japanese authorities in 1943.  Jewish as well as secular education, and involvement in the youth Zionist organizations are discussed.  
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
Over 17,000 Jews found refuge in Shanghai, China during World War II. In this section, interviewees talk about the process of adopting and adjusting to the cultural traits and social patterns in the new country and detail their daily life in China. They describe the living conditions and explain how they were able to maintain their Jewish identity while in Shanghai and in the Hongkew Ghetto, established by the occupying Japanese authorities in 1943.  Jewish as well as secular education, and involvement in the youth Zionist organizations are discussed.
Thursday, June 27, 2013
When the Japanese surrender on September 2, 1945, there are 25,000 to 30,000 Jews in China, 17,000 of them in Shanghai. The Shanghai ghetto is only opened with the arrival of an American goodwill mission on September 3, 1945. Communists and Nationalists race to establish positions in Japanese-occupied areas of China. During 1945-1947, Manchuria is under Soviet occupation, and Jewish community leaders of Harbin are arrested and sent to the Soviet interior.
Thursday, June 20, 2013
When the Japanese surrender on September 2, 1945, there are 25,000 to 30,000 Jews in China, 17,000 of them in Shanghai. The Shanghai ghetto is only opened with the arrival of an American goodwill mission on September 3, 1945. Communists and Nationalists race to establish positions in Japanese-occupied areas of China. During 1945-1947, Manchuria is under Soviet occupation, and Jewish community leaders of Harbin are arrested and sent to the Soviet interior. Chinese Nationalists and Communists sign a truce on January 10, 1946.
Tuesday, June 3, 2014
Holocaust education is uniquely situated in China, a country without an antisemitic tradition, and thousands of miles from where the Holocaust happened. The last 20 years have seen great progress with Holocaust education programs there.