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Sunday, May 5, 2013
This theme focuses on how the Nazis forced large numbers of Jews into restricted housing areas, often enforced with walls, fences, and/or guard towers. Movement in and out of the ghettos was strictly controlled and violation was punishable by death.
Monday, May 20, 2013
Wednesday, June 4, 2014
Monday, August 5, 2013
For Hungarian-language resource, with English subtitles, The Wallenberg Lesson, please click on the link below. A Raoul Wallenbergről készült magyar nyelvű (angol feliratos) oktatási anyag megtekintéséhez kattintson az alábbi képre. A Wallenberg-lecke
Tuesday, May 28, 2013
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
Wednesday, November 13, 2013
Wednesday, November 13, 2013
Wednesday, November 20, 2013
Friday, May 30, 2014
Tuesday, June 3, 2014
Monday, June 9, 2014
Thursday, June 12, 2014
Thursday, March 15, 2018
Thursday, June 29, 2017
Tuesday, May 7, 2013
Thursday, June 20, 2013
During World War II, China was divided into three occupation zones among the Communist (CCP) forces led by Mao Tse-tung based in the north, the Nationalist (Kuomintang, KMT) forces led by Chiang Kai-shek based in the west, and the Japanese armed forces along the eastern seaboard. When the U.S. enters World War II on December 8, 1941, the United States becomes an ally of China.
Thursday, June 27, 2013
During World War II, China was divided into three occupation zones among the Communist (CCP) forces led by Mao Tse-tung based in the north, the Nationalist (Kuomintang, KMT) forces led by Chiang Kai-shek based in the west, and the Japanese armed forces along the eastern seaboard. When the U.S. enters World War II on December 8, 1941, the United States becomes an ally of China.
Sunday, May 5, 2013
This theme focuses on the ways in which survivors observed Jewish holidays in the ghettos and camps.
Thursday, June 20, 2013
On February 18, 1943, as a result of German pressure, Japanese authorities established a ghetto in the Hongkew neighborhood of Shanghai for stateless Jewish refugees who had arrived in Shanghai from Germany and German-occupied areas of Europe from 1937-1942. Kanoh Ghoya was a Japanese official responsible for giving monthly passes to Jewish refugees living in the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China during World War II. Ghoya was also known as the "King of the Jews" and was infamous for his inhumane treatment of ghetto inhabitants.
Thursday, June 27, 2013
On February 18, 1943, as a result of German pressure, Japanese authorities established a ghetto in the Hongkew neighborhood of Shanghai for stateless Jewish refugees who had arrived in Shanghai from Germany and German-occupied areas of Europe from 1937-1942. Kanoh Ghoya was a Japanese official responsible for giving monthly passes to Jewish refugees living in the Hongkew ghetto in Shanghai, China during World War II. Ghoya was also known as the "King of the Jews" and was infamous for his inhumane treatment of ghetto inhabitants.
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
Over 17,000 Jews found refuge in Shanghai, China during World War II. In this section, interviewees discuss the patterns of relationships among people who interacted with one another in Shanghai, in the Hongkew Ghetto, and between the ghetto inhabitants, the local population, and the occupying Japanese authorities.  Relations between Jewish refugees of different cultures and from different regions and countries within the Shanghai community are described.
Thursday, June 27, 2013
Over 17,000 Jews found refuge in Shanghai, China, during World War II. In this section, interviewees discuss the patterns of relationships among people who interacted with one another in Shanghai, in the Hongkew Ghetto, and between the ghetto inhabitants, the local population, and the occupying Japanese authorities.  Relations between Jewish refugees of different cultures and from different regions and countries within the Shanghai community are described.
Thursday, June 20, 2013
Over 17,000 Jews found refuge in Shanghai, China during World War II. In this section, interviewees talk about the process of adopting and adjusting to the cultural traits and social patterns in the new country and detail their daily life in China. They describe the living conditions and explain how they were able to maintain their Jewish identity while in Shanghai and in the Hongkew Ghetto, established by the occupying Japanese authorities in 1943.  Jewish as well as secular education, and involvement in the youth Zionist organizations are discussed.  
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
Over 17,000 Jews found refuge in Shanghai, China during World War II. In this section, interviewees talk about the process of adopting and adjusting to the cultural traits and social patterns in the new country and detail their daily life in China. They describe the living conditions and explain how they were able to maintain their Jewish identity while in Shanghai and in the Hongkew Ghetto, established by the occupying Japanese authorities in 1943.  Jewish as well as secular education, and involvement in the youth Zionist organizations are discussed.
Friday, March 25, 2016
To commemorate Genocide Awareness Month listen to clips of testimony from survivors across six genocides represented in the Visual History Archive. This testimony series follows the narrative of the "Pyramid of Hate," which lists the steps, beginning with Prejudiced Attitudes, Acts of Prejudice, Discrimination and then Violence, which lead to Genocide and Genocide Denial. Explore full-length testimony from the Visual History Archive
Thursday, June 27, 2013
When the Japanese surrender on September 2, 1945, there are 25,000 to 30,000 Jews in China, 17,000 of them in Shanghai. The Shanghai ghetto is only opened with the arrival of an American goodwill mission on September 3, 1945. Communists and Nationalists race to establish positions in Japanese-occupied areas of China. During 1945-1947, Manchuria is under Soviet occupation, and Jewish community leaders of Harbin are arrested and sent to the Soviet interior.
Friday, May 6, 2016
A new monument honoring victims of women’s slave labor camps, most of whom were Polish Jewish teenagers at the time, was unveiled on May 9th, 2016, the 71st anniversary of their liberation, in Trutnov, Czech Republic. The camps, part of Organization Shmelt, were located by textile mills and included: Gabersdorf, Parshnitz, Schatzlar, Ober Alstadt, Bernsdorf, Arnau, Dunkenthal, Hohenelbe, Ober Hohenelbe, Leibau and Bausnitz. After the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, they became concentration camps grouped under the administration of Gross-Rosen.

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