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Friday, May 5, 2017
I had interviewed dozens of Gabersdorf survivors, discovered there had been 10 other women’s slave labor camps in Trutnov, then Trautenau, Sudetenland and that the 5,000 Polish Jewish women trafficked to Trutnov were among the first to be imprisoned in Nazi camps and the last to be liberated, on May 8th--9th, 1945. Didn’t they deserve to be honored, too?
Friday, April 21, 2017
Holocaust survivor Tauba Weiss shares her frustration with losing her family and the more general loss of the Holocaust, while also being thankful for being able to share her testimony with Jewish Family and Children's Services.
Thursday, June 29, 2017
Tuesday, January 3, 2017
Monday, December 11, 2017
We at USC Shoah Foundation are saddened to hear of the passing of our beloved friend, Holocaust survivor and renowned artist Alice Lok Cahana, who passed away on November 28 at age 88. Through her internationally acclaimed artwork, writings, and public speaking, Alice put forth a message to the world that both memorialized those who perished during the Holocaust and celebrated the strength of the human spirit.
Friday, June 16, 2017
The staff at USC Shoah Foundation is saddened to learn about recent the passing of Asa Shapiro, father of board member Mickey Shapiro and Holocaust survivor.
Thursday, May 11, 2017
USC Shoah Foundation is saddened to learn of the passing of Holocaust survivor Curt Lowens, a wartime hero who became a well-known character actor when he moved to the United States. He was 91. Born Curt Lowenstein on Nov. 17, 1925 in Germany, Lowen and his family had planned to emigrate to the United States as World War II was starting, but they were stopped from leaving the Netherlands when the Germans invaded that country. He was briefly deported to the Westerbork concentration camp in 1943, but he was released because of his father’s business connections.
Tuesday, January 3, 2017
Tuesday, January 3, 2017
Tuesday, January 3, 2017
Tuesday, January 3, 2017
Thursday, September 7, 2017
USC Shoah Foundation mourns the death of Georg Citrom, Holocaust survivor and longtime friend of the Institute. Citrom was born in Oradea, Romania, in 1931. His father was a teacher in the local Jewish school and he had one older sister, Suzy. His family practiced modern Orthodox Judaism and he loved visiting his grandparents at their house in the countryside.
Thursday, September 14, 2017
We are sad to learn of the passing of Kurt Messerschmidt, Holocaust survivor, educator and beloved cantor. He was 102. Messerschmidt was born Jan. 2, 1915 in Weneuchen, Germany, but moved to Berlin in 1918 and excelled as a linguistics scholar, gymnast and musician. He was well-respected and a leader among his classmates and teachers, but was unable to attend college because of anti-Jewish measures implemented by the Nazis.
Thursday, October 19, 2017
Holocaust survivor Lucille Eichengreen describes how her former work in the concentration camp led to the arrest of several SS officers.
Thursday, October 19, 2017
Holocaust survivor Robert Fisch explains what he wants people to take away from his illustrated book on the Holocaust.
Tuesday, October 31, 2017
Access copies of 20 testimonies conducted in San Antonio, Texas.  For more information, please contact the USC Shoah Foundation: Tel:  +1 213 740 3756 Email:  sfiaccess@usc.edu
Wednesday, November 1, 2017
Access copies of 3 testimonies given by local survivors. For more information, please contact the USC Shoah Foundation: Tel:  +1 213 740 3756 Email:  sfiaccess@usc.edu
Thursday, December 7, 2017
Monday, August 28, 2017
On August 24, 2017, scholars from Latin America presented their initial findings on their use of the Visual History Archive and mapped out potential avenues of inquiry focusing on Holocaust survivors who eventually settled in Latin America. This presentation is one of the outcomes of a "scholar in residence" fellowship that brings together scholars from a variety of disciplines to collaborate on a research project at USC for Interdisciplinary Research Week.
Thursday, September 14, 2017
Tuesday, October 31, 2017
Access copies of 22 testimonies conducted in Brooklyn, New York. For more information, please contact the USC Shoah Foundation: Tel:  +1 213 740 3756 Email:  sfiaccess@usc.edu
Tuesday, July 11, 2017
Following another arduous school year, 17 teachers who participated in the 2016 edition of USC Shoah Foundation’s Master Teacher program in Hungary returned to present the testimony-based lessons they developed and piloted in their classes over the past year.
Tuesday, November 7, 2017
At the Shoah Foundation, I was able to converse with a still-living Holocaust survivor named Pinchas Gutter. Pinchas wasn’t really there, though; I was chatting with a hologram of Pinchas, which appeared on a flat, 2D display in the hallway. The conversation felt almost absurdly natural, due in large part to the foundation’s development of its own natural language processing system. At one point, I realized I felt rude interrupting a video.
Wednesday, May 3, 2017
USC Shoah Foundation has partnered with The Memory Project Productions to debut a new IWitness activity and incorporate testimony into the organization’s curriculum.
Tuesday, August 1, 2017
The need for continued memorialization of the fate of the Roma and Sinti population of Europe has never been more important.
Tuesday, September 5, 2017
Edgar Feuchtwanger's Hitler, My Neighbor: Memories of a Jewish Childhood A book presentation with discussion moderated by Professor Paul Lerner                        
Saturday, April 22, 2017
You've read about the Holocaust in books and seen it portrayed in films. But it's another experience entirely to walk through the site of a concentration camp in virtual reality, led by a survivor who lost his entire family there. The Last Goodbye, which debuts at the Tribeca Film Festival this week, follows Pinchas Gutter as he makes his final pilgrimage to Majdanek, a former Nazi Germany extermination camp in occupied Poland. It's a trip he's made many times, but this one has a specific purpose: to capture his account of the Holocaust so we never forget that it actually happened.

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