Search

Displaying 1 - 22 of 22 results
Tuesday, May 7, 2013
Rwandan Tutsi Genocide survivor Kizito Kalima shares his hope that people take action to prevent future genocides. He vows  to do anything necessary to ensure the world is a safe, peaceful place.
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
Wednesday, November 13, 2013
Friday, May 23, 2014
Memorial Day in the United States commemorates the men and women who died while in the military service. US army veteran Leon Adler remembers helping mortally wounded soldiers while serving in Germany.
Tuesday, August 12, 2014
Carl Wilkens speaks on recording audio memoirs while living in Rwanda during the 1994 genocide. His reasoning for recording the messages wasn’t necessarily to document what was happening but the recording would be an audio diary for his family in case he didn’t survive.
Wednesday, October 1, 2014
Branko Lustig, producer of Schindler’s List and the 50,000th interviewee in the Visual History Archive, recalls returning to Auschwitz during the filming of the TV mini-series War and Remembrance.
Monday, November 24, 2014
 Fred Agar describes the camp selections and intake procedures at Auschwitz, specifically about the painful process of getting a number tattooed on his arm. This is the 12th testimony clip in the series 70 Days of Testimony: Leading up to the 70th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz.
Monday, September 8, 2014
Tom Lantos describes in detail the specific lessons and tricks he learned  to memorize particular aspects of his Latin lessons. He continues to speak on the importance and affect his Hungarian education had on him.
Sunday, November 24, 2013
Norbert Friedman talks about the importance of learning lessons from the Holocaust, which include human compassion for others, tolerance of different religions and respect for human life.
Monday, August 4, 2014
Leo Hymas, United States Armed Forces and Buchenwald camp liberator speaks only for the second time in his life about a particular combat operation in Düsseldorf, Germany. This testimony clip was featured in the lesson, Heroes, from Teaching with Testimony in the 21st Century.
Tuesday, July 8, 2014
Jean Sothere Ndamyuwera reflects on life after the genocide in Rwanda and the lessons he learned. He also speaks on the importance of tolerance and forgiveness. Jean’s testimony is featured in the IWitness activity, Information Quest: The Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda.
Monday, October 27, 2014
Nathan Offen recalls when he last saw his younger sister Miriam and his mother before they were deported to a concentration camp. He also speaks about the emotional and physical toll the splitting up of the family had on his father. His testimony is featured in Lesson 5 of Echoes and Reflections
Thursday, May 15, 2014
Richard Rozen remembers hiding with his family in an attic of a small cabin on a farm in Poland for over two years. At night when everyone was sleeping Richard’s father gave him writing and reading lessons. Richard’s testimony is featured in the book, Testimony – The Legacy of Schindler’s List and the USC Shoah Foundation.
Sunday, May 5, 2013
“I think this is very important … what you are doing to keep the memory of the people alive. Because the survivor community is diminishing … because one sentence, one episode that a survivor has to share that nobody else did, is worthwhile.” —Isaac Goodfriend
Tuesday, May 28, 2013
In honor of Memorial Day, we gratefully honor Arthur Langhorst, an American surgical technician and decorated World War II veteran, and the 361 other liberators from 19 countries who have given testimony to the Visual History Archive. Arthur recounts in this clip a tragic encounter with a young soldier who was brought to his operating table after sustaining injuries in the Battle of the Bulge.
Thursday, January 16, 2014
Leon Bass, US military veteran, reflects on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr and how he was inspired by King’s message of non-violence. Leon was at the Lincoln Memorial in 1963 for the March on Washington and he describes his experience of watching Martin Luther King Jr’s “I Have a Dream,” speech. 
Monday, March 17, 2014
Dennis Urstein was a Kanada Kommando in Auschwitz who collected inmates' belongings they were forced to leave behind. He reflects on witnessing the arrivals of new inmates to Auschwitz II-Birkenau.See more clips on Auschwitz
Wednesday, April 22, 2015
In the spring of 1915, the Young Turk regime of the Ottoman began a genocide against its Armenian population under the cover of World War I. This minute-long excerpt features survivor Haroutune Aivazian.  He describes the horror his mother faced when a town crier in Marash, a city in Cilcia in South West Anatolia, called for the Armenians of the community to gather in a square just outside of the town for deportation. As his mother prepared for the journey, a local Turkish man warned the family that deportation meant death.
Wednesday, May 13, 2015
After his arrest in September 1942, Stefan Kosinski was incarcerated while awaiting his trial. In this clip, he recounts the conditions in the jail and his memory of seeing his mother out the window of his jail cell keeping vigil. She is also present during his trial before the Nazi court, which sentences Stefan to five years hard labor. Foreign words in this clip:pedo (Polish): derogatory term for a gay personschwul (German): gay, homosexualZuchthaus (German): penitentiary
Wednesday, April 15, 2015
The murder of extended families, the targeting of community leaders, the critical role of eyewitnesses--each of these factors surfaces in Haigas Bonapart’s interview. These tactics are all too familiar to those of us who study the crime of genocide and the strategies employed by its perpetrators. By destroying communal ties and eliminating those individuals who might rally a group in self-defense, civilians under systematic assault are made much more vulnerable to isolation and mass violence.
Friday, April 24, 2015
In this short clip Harry Kurkjian recalls Armenians who were about to be killed crying out in despair, “Where are you God?”  “Why are you punishing us?”  As the first nation to convert to Christianity in 301 AD, the events of 1915 raised a fundamental theological problem for Armenians.  If God is good and all-powerful, why was he not intervening on their behalf?  The problem of theodicy, as theologians refer to it, is an issue that surfaces in nearly every genocide, driving some people to completely abandon faith in God.  Indeed, the “God is Dead” movement arose after the Holocaust as Jewis