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Friday, February 5, 2016
Professor Keaveney’s upper level French course explores themes of love, loss, collective and personal memory, and modernity through readings of French literary texts, theoretical readings, films, poems, and songs. One of the texts used in the class is the French novel Dora Bruder, which tells the story of a young girl who was sent to Auschwitz. The book combines different aspects of memory, loss, life, chronology, and French history, and reconstructs what the girl’s life may have been like, even though very little is known about her.
Wednesday, February 14, 2018
This joint online collaborative interdisciplinary research seminar focuses on novel ways of thinking about “the archive.” Dealing with the issues of archives, memory, and human rights, the course’s main question concerns the reasons why some knowledge about the past is preserved and other knowledge is not. The course is organized so as to give the students a “hands-on” experience with working with the archive by introducing them to particular examples of archives, such as the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive.
Thursday, June 27, 2013
Professor Schwartzman offers an elective to undergraduate seniors mostly majoring in communication studies as well as students majoring in other disciplines. The course is specifically structured around several different voices. It begins with Nazi-era propaganda approached from several different media: written, audio, and visual. Much of the course is the survivor testimony component, together with films about the Holocaust.