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Tuesday, November 7, 2017
At the Shoah Foundation, I was able to converse with a still-living Holocaust survivor named Pinchas Gutter. Pinchas wasn’t really there, though; I was chatting with a hologram of Pinchas, which appeared on a flat, 2D display in the hallway. The conversation felt almost absurdly natural, due in large part to the foundation’s development of its own natural language processing system. At one point, I realized I felt rude interrupting a video.
Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Neuroscientists have mapped how the human brain experiences gratitude by using the testimony of Holocaust survivors Experts used recordings of victims from archives to test and track the emotions in people who had no personal connections to mass slaughter of Jews.  
Saturday, April 22, 2017
You've read about the Holocaust in books and seen it portrayed in films. But it's another experience entirely to walk through the site of a concentration camp in virtual reality, led by a survivor who lost his entire family there. The Last Goodbye, which debuts at the Tribeca Film Festival this week, follows Pinchas Gutter as he makes his final pilgrimage to Majdanek, a former Nazi Germany extermination camp in occupied Poland. It's a trip he's made many times, but this one has a specific purpose: to capture his account of the Holocaust so we never forget that it actually happened.
Monday, January 25, 2016
Nearly 80 years later, Liu Suzhen could still recall her ordeal. And when she did, her ruddy cheeks burned. She shielded her face with chapped, swollen fingers as though Japanese bombers were zooming down as she spoke.
Monday, August 31, 2015
Next year marks the 20th anniversary of the end of the civil war in Guatemala. During the conflict that spanned more than 3 decades, tens of thousands of indigenous Mayans were killed in what is known as the "Guatemalan Genocide." Researchers are now collecting video testimonies of the survivors to preserve their memories of what happened. Elizabeth Lee reports from Los Angeles. 
Friday, April 28, 2017
One of the great questions — in life, not just in VR — is how we’ll memorialize victims of mass tragedy. Technology offers myriad tools, but how to use them so that they’re effective and not exploitative? Specifically, this has been a question involving the Shoah — how will the murder of 6 million people be marked when the day comes that anyone old enough to have lived through it will have died? As the youngest survivors approach 80, it’s more than a hypothetical.