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Tuesday, January 22, 2019
“Who Will Write Our History” tells how ghetto inhabitant Emanuel Ringelblum, a historian, spearheaded an effort to collect what became one of the most important caches of eyewitness accounts to survive World War II. USC Shoah Foundation is a screening-event partner.
Thursday, March 7, 2019
Roughly 1,000 audio-only interviews recorded by students of UCLA history Professor Richard Hovannisian were entrusted to USC Shoah Foundation. This week, Hovannisian and three of his former students gave a talk about how they amassed such a large repository of memory at so crucial a time, “when denialism was huge.”
Tuesday, March 19, 2019
Widely known as the “Portuguese Schindler,” Aristides de Sousa Mendes was severely punished by his own government after flouting its neutrality policy with a frantic bid to issue as many visas as possible to desperate refugees fleeing Nazi invasion. In interviews with USC Shoah Foundation, the sons of Sousa Mendes and Jewish survivors rescued by him shared personal stories of his heroism.
Wednesday, May 22, 2019
Dr. Ruth Westheimer’s early life history is explored in a new IWitness activity that uses clips of testimony she gave to USC Shoah Foundation in 1998. The activity accompanies Dr. Ruth’s newly released illustrated memoir, “Roller-Coaster Grandma.”
Wednesday, April 20, 2016
As the indexer for USC Shoah Foundation’s Armenian Genocide Testimony Collection, I have to listen carefully to hundreds of testimonies assigning keywords to each minute so that these stories will be accessible in the Visual History Archive. Now just in time for the 101st anniversary of the Armenian Genocide we will be integrating an additional 155 indexed testimonies into the Archive. I thought this would be a fitting time to highlight some of the most interesting aspects of the 245 testimonies that will be available in the Visual History Archive Online.
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research organized a symposium in the Fall to honor the work of leading Holocaust scholar David Cesarani from Great Britain, who died just weeks after being named by the USC Shoah Foundation the inaugural Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar in Residence. These are the remarks made by David Silberklang at the event.
Tuesday, September 16, 2014
Le sauvetage est un sujet fondamental pour comprendre la survie au cours du génocide et mesurer la difficulté des choix effectués par les individus dans des circonstances extrêmes. Bien que de nombreuses histoires de survie pendant l’Holocauste soient dues à des circonstances inexpliquées ou inexplicables, il y a aussi des traces multiples d’aides individuelle ou collective et de sauvetage qui permirent à des milliers de Juifs de survivre.

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