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Monday, April 6, 2015
The noted Armenian hero General Antranig Ozanian, was born on February 25, 1865, and died on August 31, 1927. He spent the final years of his life living quietly with his wife in Fresno, California.General Antranig was the most well-known of Armenian freedom fighters in the twentieth century, and his exploits are remembered by Armenians throughout the world. General Antranig is buried today at the Yerablur cemetery in Yerevan, Armenia.
Tuesday, April 7, 2015
Sam Kadorian was born in 1907 in Hussenig, a small village in the province of Kharpert, in the eastern plains of Anatolia. He survived the Genocide in 1915 at the age of 8 when the Turkish gendarmes grabbed all the young boys of the village ages 5 to 10 and threw them into a pile on the sandy beach of the shores of the Euphrates River and starting jabbing them with their swords and bayonets. Fortunately, they only nipped his cheek and his grandmother later found him and nursed him back to health.
Thursday, April 9, 2015
Alice Muggerditchian Shipley was 11 years old when in autumn of 1914 Turkey entered the war alongside Germany against the Allied Powers, and the atrocities against Armenians began. The Ottoman government took advantage of the war years to realize its premeditated and systematically implemented annihilation of the Armenian population. In this short clip, Alice describes the horrors of the first few months before her family was forced to take the route of deportation out of Harpout (Kharbert).
Friday, April 10, 2015
Vahram Morookian describes an experience that in some ways was typical and in at least one way unusual for the Armenian Genocide.  He was from Everek, a town in central Turkey near the well-known center of Kayseri.  The Armenian population of his town was deported, which was the common form the genocide took in the months and years after the early 1915 extermination of the 250,000 Armenian men in the Ottoman army and the national Armenian political, cultural, and religious leadership beginning April 24, 1915.  With most potential defenders and organizers removed, the deportations meant to d
Wednesday, April 15, 2015
The murder of extended families, the targeting of community leaders, the critical role of eyewitnesses--each of these factors surfaces in Haigas Bonapart’s interview. These tactics are all too familiar to those of us who study the crime of genocide and the strategies employed by its perpetrators. By destroying communal ties and eliminating those individuals who might rally a group in self-defense, civilians under systematic assault are made much more vulnerable to isolation and mass violence.
Wednesday, April 15, 2015
Dirouhi Haigas was a young Turkish-Armenian girl of 7 when she and her family were abruptly uprooted from their home and deported on foot to the southern desert. A native of Konya, Turkey, she had lived an idyllic life up to that time with her parents, grandparents, aunt, and uncles. Her father was in the family business as a leather merchant, and her uncles were amateur musicians who loved nothing more than to get together with friends and relatives to enjoy folk music and dancing.  This life came to an abrupt end with the outbreak of World War I.
Friday, April 17, 2015
Wolf Dieter Bihl is a famous Austrian historian, with a number of published works on Austria-Hungary and the First World War. In this clip, he is touching upon two important issues pertaining to the history of the Armenian Genocide. The first is his assertion that representatives of the allies of the Ottoman Empire during the war, i.e. that other Central Powers, and Germany and Austria-Hungary in particular, reported extensively in their internal, confidential correspondence that what the Young Turk government was up to was actually a determined attempt to exterminate the Armenian race.
Friday, April 17, 2015
This brief clip reveals a number of significant points about the early stage of the Armenian Genocide (spring-summer 1915) in many areas. The first is that although one reads in memoirs and accounts of Armenians who were expecting “something bad to happen,” many, if not most, Armenian villagers believed that they were going to be relocated in a peaceful manner.
Monday, April 20, 2015
Mihran Andonian is describing an experience that was common during the Armenian Genocide.  Some Armenian mothers, certain that they would not survive the death marches into the desert, let their children be taken by Muslims (Turks, Arabs, Kurds), hoping to guarantee survival. Other Armenian mothers on the caravans died while still with their children leaving these orphans to fend for themselves. Indeed, thousands of Armenian children were left homeless by the end of World War I and were either taken in by locals or rounded up by missionaries and brought to orphanages.
Tuesday, April 21, 2015
“Get angry about it”, the conclusion of this clip, presents one of Israel Charny’s most important messages.
Friday, April 24, 2015
In this brief clip Father Krikor Guerguerian is faced with a theological question that has challenged many survivors of the Armenian Genocide. The perpetrator confesses to him that he killed his father, three brothers and confiscated their house and garden and asks Guerguerian for forgiveness.
Friday, April 24, 2015
In this short clip Harry Kurkjian recalls Armenians who were about to be killed crying out in despair, “Where are you God?”  “Why are you punishing us?”  As the first nation to convert to Christianity in 301 AD, the events of 1915 raised a fundamental theological problem for Armenians.  If God is good and all-powerful, why was he not intervening on their behalf?  The problem of theodicy, as theologians refer to it, is an issue that surfaces in nearly every genocide, driving some people to completely abandon faith in God.  Indeed, the “God is Dead” movement arose after the Holocaust as Jewis
Friday, April 24, 2015
In some ways, the one minute we spend with Elsie Hagopian Taft – 56 seconds, to be precise – is a wrenching primer on the Armenian Genocide. It is a poignant and powerful evocation of an innermost ring of Dante’s inferno, and a courageous explanation of why the Armenian Genocide matters today.
Tuesday, November 3, 2015
Neuroscientist Glenn Fox is a researcher at USC Brain and Creativity Institute and used testimony from the Visual History Archive to study the affects of gratitude in the brain.
Wednesday, October 28, 2015
Educators looking for strategies and best practices for teaching using testimonies from the Visual History Archive can refer to a new guide published on the IWitness website.
Tuesday, November 3, 2015
Dan-Morgan Russell is a senior at USC studying International Relations. Testimony inspires Dan to educate others and inspire policy to help those affected by atrocities.
Friday, January 16, 2015
John Bergeisen recounts the task of dismantling the camp's gas chambers before Russian soldiers arrived at Auschwitz. This is the 61st testimony clip in the series 70 Days of Testimony: Leading up to the 70th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz.
Tuesday, January 20, 2015
Eva Slonim recalls undergoing medical camp experiments including painful blood tests. This is the 67th testimony clip in the series 70 Days of Testimony: Leading up to the 70th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz.
Friday, March 20, 2015
Teachers in Hungary are once again invited to learn how to construct their own testimony-based classroom activities.
Friday, January 16, 2015
The Holocaust may not seem obviously relevant for Hungarian students studying for their master’s in social work, nursing and other health-related topics. But a "Teaching with Testimony in the 21st Century" graduate is using testimony to teach just such a course
Monday, October 26, 2015
Cornelia Aaron Swaab says she wanted to give her testimony to USC Shoah Foundation in the hope that by sharing her own experiences with the world, she can do her part to prevent future genocides.
Tuesday, November 3, 2015
Marina Kay is senior at USC studying at International Relations and president of USC Shoah Foundation's student organization, Defy. She shares how testimony now plays an integral part of her life in and outside of the university.
Wednesday, January 14, 2015
Erwin Herling describes how he used his resources to bribe SS officers to help him leave Auschwitz when the camp was being evacuated. This is the 59th testimony clip in the series 70 Days of Testimony: Leading up to the 70th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz.
Friday, January 16, 2015
Miriam Ziegler describes her experiences with her family in the camp. She recounts a joyous reunion with her grandmother as well as an escape from execution with her great aunt. This is the 64th testimony clip in the series 70 Days of Testimony: Leading up to the 70th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz.
Tuesday, January 20, 2015
Marta Wise remembers how she escaped from Josef Mengele’s grim selection, as Russian planes flew overhead and prisoners were forced to scatter. This is the 66th testimony clip in the series 70 Days of Testimony: Leading up to the 70th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz.
Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Due to the ongoing political and military conflicts in their country, many students in Ukraine have something in common with Holocaust survivors: They have all experienced the fear and uncertainty of war.
Thursday, December 17, 2015
The 2015 International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling awarded “Best Paper” to the staff of USC Shoah Foundation’s New Dimensions in Testimony project.
Wednesday, March 18, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation is planning to record 20 new testimonies for the second phase of its North Africa and Middle East collection. Fundraising is currently underway for this phase to begin.
Wednesday, September 23, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation Senior International Program Consultant Martin Šmok has begun teaching a yearlong course at the Ronald Lauder Jewish School in Prague to introduce students to the Visual History Archive and testimony.
Friday, December 4, 2015
A new anthology "From Testimony to Story: Video Interviews about Nazi Crimes: Perspectives and Experiences in Four Countries" includes two chapters about USC Shoah Foundation, written by its regional consultants in Czech Republic and Poland.

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