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Wednesday, June 22, 2016
Jason Hensely’s project to interview Kindertransport survivors who were taken in by Christadelphians during World War II began with an Echoes and Reflections online professional development course.
Friday, April 15, 2016
Growing up, David Cook heard tales of his grandfather’s time in the service during World War II ­-- particularly how he had helped liberate Buchenwald, a Nazi concentration camp in Germany.Though his grandfather passed away in 2001, this past semester, Cook had the opportunity to dive deeper into his story and World War II in his “History of the Holocaust” course taught by Professor Adam R. Seipp, USC Shoah Foundation’s first-ever Texas A&M Teaching Fellow.
Monday, August 29, 2016
Today’s younger generation is often known for having short attention spans. They want their news short and immediately. But it’s for exactly this reason that Texas A&M senior Anna Davis enjoyed listening to testimony through USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive.
Monday, June 20, 2016
As the facilitator of the most recent Echoes and Reflections Online Professional Development course, Esther Hurh helped introduce over two dozen teachers to teaching with testimony for the first time. Hurh has worked with the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) in a variety of roles for over 15 years, including as the director of training and curriculum development in ADL’s education department. She is currently an education and curriculum consultant for Echoes and Reflections, ADL and other education and advocacy groups.
Thursday, October 27, 2016
Since 2011, Jayne Perilstein has worked hard to make a difference at two organizations: USC Shoah Foundation and the University of Pennsylvania. And this month, she was formally recognized by Penn with an award that encompasses her work with both.
Tuesday, October 4, 2016
Like many educators who use Echoes and Reflections to teach about the Holocaust, Koty Zelinka Cole first heard about the program through a colleague. Now, she is the one recommending it to other educators who are looking for resources to help them teach the Holocaust and World War II.
Monday, October 17, 2016
Nearly every day since she first received her teacher’s resource guide from Echoes and Reflections this spring, Becky Henderson-Howie has used it to teach her students in northern New York about the Holocaust. The middle- and high school English, Holocaust and Public Speaking teacher met Echoes and Reflections educator Jennifer Goss at the Belfer National Conference for Educators at USHMM in November 2015, and Goss encouraged her to sign up for Echoes and Reflections’ free online professional development courses.
Wednesday, May 18, 2016
Aliza Caplan is about to graduate from the University of Pennsylvania, but it wasn’t until her final semester of her undergraduate studies that she took one of her favorite courses: “Witnessing, Remembering, and Writing the Holocaust” with Professor Liliane Weissberg.
Thursday, July 28, 2016
After seventh grade teacher Rebekah Lang taught the Holocaust for the first time last year, she wasn’t satisfied with her performance. So, she turned to Echoes and Reflections to improve her and her students’ learning experience the next time around.
Thursday, October 6, 2016
Jiří Kocian started out using the Visual History Archive himself as a researcher. Now, he’s helping others discover testimony as the coordinator of the Malach Center for Visual History at Charles University in Prague.
Monday, November 7, 2016
Peter Tillen was so inspired by his high school Holocaust and Genocide Studies elective course last year that he wanted to make sure his whole community celebrated the teacher responsible. Peter nominated his teacher Jennifer Goss for the Dawbarn Education Award, awarded every year to 10 local teachers by the Community Foundation of Central Blue Ridge in Virginia. Last week, Goss was announced as one of the winners of the 2016 awards, which comes with a $10,000 prize. 
Monday, October 31, 2016
Michael Levesque helps his students at After School Matters in Chicago develop the skills they will need to succeed in college and beyond. Two weeks ago, those lessons included a brand new activity from IWitness that inspired his students to think about the world and their place in it.
Wednesday, September 28, 2016
The students in Kristen Link’s high school German classes in Illinois learn a lot more than a new language. With the help of Echoes and Reflections, they also learn about one of the darkest chapters in German history. Link has taught the Holocaust as part of her German classes for over 15 years, but said she has felt for a while that something was missing from her teaching. She thought that there had to be a way to make her teaching on the subject more effective.
Thursday, August 4, 2016
The staff of the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research had a dilemma on their hands. They could only choose one applicant to award the 2016 Graduate Summer Research Fellowship – but they couldn’t bring themselves to turn away their runner-up, Piotr Florczyk, because his proposal was so fascinating. It’s easy to see why. Florczyk, a PhD candidate in the USC Literature and Creative Writing program, intends to write poetry inspired by the testimonies of Polish Holocaust survivors in the archive.
Monday, August 22, 2016
Kim Kerwin was one of a select group of teachers who participated in USC Shoah Foundation’s first three-day ITeach Institute in Michigan last week, and she walked away from the training inspired to incorporate testimony into her classes at St. Fabian Catholic School.
Friday, December 2, 2016
Susan Davenport’s English students at John S. Battle High School in Virginia demonstrated just how deeply they have been affected by testimony from the Visual History Archive when they participated in the Institute’s #BeginsWithMe Giving Tuesday campaign.
Friday, April 29, 2016
Last summer, social studies teacher Amy Mclaughlin-Hatch went on trip with the Holocaust and Jewish Resistance Teacher’s Program to Germany and Poland, visiting 42 sites significant in the Holocaust. Now, with the help of IWitness, she’s bringing this knowledge back to her high school students at Southeastern Regional Vocational High School in South Easton, Massachusetts.
Monday, October 24, 2016
Empathy and concern over her city’s slipping memory of what happened at the Babi Yar ravine colored National Polytechnic University student Svetlana Polkovnikova’s decision to intern with the new Babi Yar IWalk, an educational program that put on a walk around the area guided by testimony clips from the Visual History Archive. “I joined the young interns program because it is very important for me to spread information about the events that happened in Babi Yar,” Polkovnikova said. “I would like modern society to know what happened here not so long ago.”
Friday, March 11, 2016
On September 11, 2001, USC Shoah Foundation was deep into its mission to collect testimonies of Holocaust survivors all over the world. On that particular morning in New York City, survivor Miriam Tauber was scheduled to record her testimony in her daughter’s home. Then, the tragedy struck.In the opening moments of her testimony, Tauber’s interviewer, Nancy Fisher, decided to address the crisis currently unfolding in Manhattan. She explains that the start of the interview was delayed three hours because of the uncertainty of the day, but they had now decided to attempt it.
Monday, March 28, 2016
When Zach Larkin was 13, he sat down with his great-grandfather to interview and record his stories about his experiences as a Hungarian Jew during the Holocaust. Larkin didn’t know that this would begin his journey researching this time period and interacting with survivor testimony.“[My great-grandfather] was a Holocaust survivor who didn’t like to talk about his experience with anyone, not even USC Shoah Foundation,” Larkin said. “But when I was 13, for some reason he talked to me and let me interview him and told me about his experience in Budapest in 1944.”
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research will host the international conference “A Conflict? Genocide and Resistance in Guatemala,” at the University of Southern California, Sept. 11-14, 2016. The scholars profiled in this series were each selected to present their research at the conference. Roddy Brett’s research on the genocide in Guatemala began 24 years ago while he was working on his second master’s degree at Cambridge – a decision he made literally overnight.
Friday, February 26, 2016
USC sophomore Dana Austin was interested in Professor Jessica Marglin’s course on the Jews of Spain because of its connection to her Spanish major. But the course actually led to her exploration of a different language altogether, with the help of the Visual History Archive: Ladino.
Monday, July 18, 2016
In a new French book about the deportation of Jews from France during the Holocaust, authors Alexandre Doulut, Serge Klarsfeld, and Sandrine Labeau used USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive to help identify survivors. The book, 1945, les rescapés d'Auschwitz témoignent (which roughly translates to 1945, Auschwitz survivors testify), the authors document the testimony of one survivor from each of the 82 deportation convoys that departed from France.
Thursday, August 25, 2016
Mélanie Péron discovered the power of personal stories the first time she was assigned to teach the Holocaust at the University of Pennsylvania. She had started out the course just trying to teach dry historical facts, and it didn’t go very well. “It was one of the hardest experiences ever,” Péron said. “It was horrendous. My students were bored, I was scared. Finally I said, ‘We’re going to do something else.’”
Tuesday, February 9, 2016
Andrea van Noord gave her students a small taste of her job of an indexer, and in return, they offered a thoughtful new perspective on the Visual History Archive.
Monday, May 16, 2016
USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research will host the international conference “A Conflict? Genocide and Resistance in Guatemala,” at the University of Southern California, Sept. 11-14, 2016. The scholars profiled in this series were each selected to present their research at the conference. Washington University postdoctoral teaching fellow Rebecca Clouser will examine genocide denial in Guatemala and how it impedes the country’s development in her presentation at the conference.
Tuesday, March 1, 2016
Teaching with Testimony in the 21st Century graduate Mónika Mészáros has published the first – and, likely, not the last – Hungarian teacher-authored IWitness activity.Mészáros teaches History and Italian language at Berzsenyi Dániel High School in Budapest, a USC Shoah Foundation partner school. Her colleague Mónika Mezei completed USC Shoah Foundation’s professional development program Teaching with Testimony in the 21st Century, and in 2014 encouraged Mészáros to apply to the program as well.
Tuesday, November 15, 2016
The reaches of the USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive are unparalleled, attracting researchers and professors from such places as Sydney, Australia and enabling them to further their work with the testimonies available online.
Monday, February 22, 2016
What started out as just a class turned into the beginning of a new passion for Lara Sassounian.Sassounian, a sophomore art history major at USC, was trying to find a course to fulfill her GE (general education) requirement last semester. The only one available, she said, was Religion 359, Culture in Diaspora: The Jews of Spain, taught by Professor Jessica Marglin. Sassounian said she had no idea what that meant, but she signed up.
Thursday, July 7, 2016
When eighth-grader Allison Vandal saw a classmate run into the classroom crying, she did the best thing she could think of to help: She wrote the classmate a poem about the power of words. That simple act of kindness would soon grow into something much bigger. Along with her friends and classmates Maya Montell and Caroline Waters, Allison started the Poets Undercover Guild (PUG), a society at Readington Middle School in New Jersey where students give or receive poetry to each other to build an inclusive community within the school.

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