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Monday, January 29, 2018
"Nothing compares to eyewitness accounts," said teacher Ivy Schamis of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. "The students get a better feel for the survivor or liberator when they hear their own words and see their body language. It is very inspiring."
Friday, July 20, 2018
USC Shoah Foundation’s annual Teaching with Testimony in the 21st Century program is a one-year professional development initiative for educators that begins with a six-day seminar for educators.
Wednesday, October 10, 2018
The additions will enable the people of Rwanda, who are still dealing with the aftermath of the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsis that left as many as 1 million people murdered over the course of 100 days, to connect with people from the past who shared similar experiences.
Thursday, October 18, 2018
Education and Outreach Specialist Sedda Antekelian and Program Officer Manuk Avedikyan shared information about the educational use of testimony in the Institute’s Visual History Archive and on the Institute’s educational website, IWitness.
Friday, March 25, 2016
Henry Laurant remembers the first time he experienced anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany. He was targeted by other children who were influenced by Nazi rhetoric. His testimony is featured in the multimedia professional development program, Echoes and Reflections.
Tuesday, December 18, 2018
The Institute’s Sara Brown discusses the power of narrative at the 3rd Global Forum Against the Crime of Genocide held earlier this month in Armenia.
Monday, April 16, 2018
On April 17, 1975, the city of Phnom Penh fell to the Khmer Rouge, triggering a four-year genocide. In commemoration, USC Shoah Foundation is spotlighting its Cambodia-based learning activities for high school students.
Wednesday, August 15, 2018
The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research first began a partnership with the Holocaust Geographies Collaborative in 2014, when the team visited the Institute to explore the ways in which the Visual History Archive can be used to create geographic visualizations of the Holocaust.
Thursday, February 22, 2018
Lecture by Trinity College history professor Samuel Kassow lays out the unique circumstances leading to the legendary battle. The 75th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising will be on April 19.
Tuesday, March 12, 2019
Wolf Gruner, the founding director of USC Shoah Foundation’s Center for Advanced Genocide Research, began his quest to build a Holocaust library as part of a new Holocaust program as soon as he arrived at USC via Berlin a decade ago.
Thursday, November 1, 2018
Learning from eyewitnesses of some of history’s darkest moments, educators strive to teach the power of decency and respect.
Thursday, August 23, 2018
Researchers conducting the study for the Hungarian Academy of Sciences say their conclusions are all the more vital in an age where, thanks to the internet, youth are more susceptible to believing “fake information.”
Tuesday, March 19, 2019
Widely known as the “Portuguese Schindler,” Aristides de Sousa Mendes was severely punished by his own government after flouting its neutrality policy with a frantic bid to issue as many visas as possible to desperate refugees fleeing Nazi invasion. In interviews with USC Shoah Foundation, the sons of Sousa Mendes and Jewish survivors rescued by him shared personal stories of his heroism.
Wednesday, April 4, 2018
As an interpreter at Nuremberg, Edith Coliver had a front-row seat to many historic moments, such as the testimony of Hermann Göring, creator of the Gestapo.
Monday, April 23, 2018
The former goaltender for a well-known Rwandan team literally owes his life to soccer. Now he uses soccer to promote tolerance and unity. This year, he was recognized by Queen Elizabeth.
Friday, January 25, 2019
USC Shoah Foundation joined a Friday ceremony at a classroom in Cottbus, Germany that contributed 100 butterflies to the Butterfly Project, an international effort by schoolchildren to paint 1.5 million ceramic butterflies – one for every child murdered in the Holocaust.