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Monday, April 8, 2019
In this lecture, Hovannisian discusses the origins and development of his course at UCLA on Armenian oral history, as well as the uses and potential misuses of oral testimony. His former students Lorna Touryan Miller, Tamar Mashigian and Salpi Ghazarian share their own impressions and experiences in adding to the collection. 
Monday, August 26, 2013
March 25, 2010: This plenary session follows up on earlier breakout sessions that addressed issues related to how context, teaching methodologies, and teaching objectives differ based on course discipline. This session is moderated by Mark Baker (Associate Professor, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia). One representative from each of the four groups reports on:
Friday, March 13, 2015
Digital Archives such as the VHA have unbounded teaching potential. The focus of this panel is on how putting such archives to pedagogical use presents unique challenges for instructors, but also innovative opportunities for students to engage with visual testimony. The panelists will explore the themes of creating a dialogue between the student and the testimony through repeated exposure, editing and understanding narratives. Chair: Todd Presner, Ph.D.Christina Isabel BrüningDJ Johnson, M.F.A.Roy Schwartzman, Ph.D.
Tuesday, October 18, 2016
Paula Cuellar Cuellar, 2016-2017 USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research Center Graduate Research Fellow, discuss esher dissertation research on scorched earth operations in Guatemala and El Salvador.
Thursday, July 11, 2013
Lilli reflects on the hardships of her life in the wartime Shanghai, China, and discusses the coping mechanism she had developed as a refugee, learning to live one day at a time.
Monday, August 26, 2013
March 25, 2010: This session covers four presentations by faculty who have integrated the Institute’s testimonies into their courses in disciplines ranging from French and Italian, Didactics, Communication Studies, and Religious Studies. This session is moderated by Carolyn Ellis, Professor of Communications and Sociology, University of South Florida.
Monday, May 20, 2013
Professors Holly Willis and Steve Anderson of USC’s Institute for Multimedia Literacy lead a discussion with educators about considerations for making “ethical” editorial decision when developing videos that use eyewitness testimony.
Tuesday, December 15, 2015
Bulgarian actress, Rebeka Arabova reflects on the capital of Bulgaria, Sofia and discusses how the war and the Holocaust had affected her childhood development, her entire life, and her personality.
Tuesday, October 18, 2016
Jewish survivor Walter Absil discusses how he developed his fake name when hiding from the Germans and how he gained the name "Walter Absil." This clip is part of the Visual History Archive's Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre collection.
Friday, January 20, 2017
100 Days to Inspire Respect Researchers have studied hate in order to deepen their understanding of how people develop the emotions and actions associated with hate. Learn more about their findings by watching the video, "What is Hate?"
Wednesday, March 19, 2014
Seventeen students and alumni of Comcast’s and One Economy's Digital Connectors Program piloted the Institute’s new online application, IWitness. During the program, students utilized IWitness to develop video projects that explored their understanding of the Holocaust and its connection to their own lives.Hear students and educators at the Digital Connectors Program speak about their experience.
Friday, March 25, 2016
Henry Laurant remembers the first time he experienced anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany. He was targeted by other children who were influenced by Nazi rhetoric. His testimony is featured in the multimedia professional development program, Echoes and Reflections.
Thursday, August 4, 2016
Highlights of the 2016 Master Teacher program in Budapest. A USC Shoah Foundation’s professional development initiative, Master Teacher (formerly Teaching with Testimony) is a two-year program that incorporates workshops, mentoring, and community building to prepare educators to search for and utilize testimony from the Visual History Archive, as well as other digital learning tools such as IWitness.
Friday, February 24, 2017
100 Days to Inspire Respect Carl Wilkens, head of the Adventist Development and Relief Agency International in Kigali, Rwanda, was the only American who stayed in Rwanda during the genocide. He explains his decision to stay.
Thursday, June 26, 2014
Henry Laurant remembers the first time he experienced antisemitism in Nazi Germany. He was targeted by other children who were influenced by Nazi rhetoric. His testimony is featured in the multimedia professional development program, Echoes and Reflections.
Friday, January 24, 2014
Simone Lagrange (nee Kadousche) was born on October 23, 1930 in Saint-Fons, France, near Lyon. Originally from Morocco, her parents Simon Kadousche andRachel came to France in the 1920s.
Wednesday, July 8, 2015
Doris Lazarus is a docent at Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center, the first institution to pilot New Dimensions in Testimony (NDT), a collaboration between USC Shoah Foundation and USC Institute for Creative Technologies (ICT), in partnership with concept developer Conscience Display. Doris reads a letter she wrote to Holocaust survivor Pinchas Gutter when he visited the museum in June 2015.
Monday, June 4, 2018
USC Shoah Foundation’s Countering Antisemitism Through Testimony Program integrates contemporary personal stories of witnesses to antisemitism into outreach, education and research programs to help counter antisemitism today. This video was screened at the UNESCO launch of policy guidelines to counter antisemitism through education, on June 4, 2018.
Wednesday, June 13, 2018
French politician Robert Badinter is used to diplomatic speeches but antisemitism is too dangerous to dance around: it deserves no mercy.
Monday, October 5, 2015
Dans cet extrait, Janine Den évoque la vie culturelle au ghetto de Varsovie et la destinée tragique de Marysia Eisenstadt.Janine Den, née Pieprz, a vu le jour à Varsovie en 1924, dans une famille juive assimilée. Ses deux parents, Mieczyslaw et Maria, travaillent dans la confection. Adolescente, Janine est admise dans un lycée d’État.Après la capitulation de la Pologne, les Allemands entrent dans la ville. Les établissements scolaires ferment. Le magasin de bijoux de sa mère est détruit dans un bombardement.
Wednesday, June 6, 2018
Antisemitism is a problem that affects humanity as whole, says Chouna Lomponda, who works at a museum that was violently attacked.
Wednesday, April 22, 2015
In the spring of 1915, the Young Turk regime of the Ottoman began a genocide against its Armenian population under the cover of World War I. This minute-long excerpt features survivor Haroutune Aivazian.  He describes the horror his mother faced when a town crier in Marash, a city in Cilcia in South West Anatolia, called for the Armenians of the community to gather in a square just outside of the town for deportation. As his mother prepared for the journey, a local Turkish man warned the family that deportation meant death.
Thursday, January 23, 2014
Howard Cwick was born in the Bronx, New York, on August 25, 1923, to Samuel and Sarah Cwick, both Polish immigrants. Howard had an older sister, Sylvia. TheCwick family spoke both English and Yiddish, kept a kosher home, and attended synagogue three times a week. Howard went to school at P.S. 100 in the Bronx beforegoing on to Brooklyn Technical High School. When he was seven years old, Howard received his first camera and became interested in photography.
Friday, April 10, 2015
When Michael Hagopian made his first classic acclaimed documentary on the Armenian Genocide in 1975, nominated for two Emmys, he titled the film “The Forgotten Genocide.” Since then decades have passed and hundreds of publications in a variety of languages have been written on the subject. The Armenian Genocide has now taken its rightfully important place within the field of genocide studies. It is not a “forgotten genocide” anymore, despite the existence of a denialist State - Turkey, which has developed denialism into an Industry.
Friday, May 27, 2016
Howard Cwick was born in the Bronx, New York, on August 25, 1923, to Samuel and Sarah Cwick, both Polish immigrants. Howard had an older sister, Sylvia. TheCwick family spoke both English and Yiddish, kept a kosher home, and attended synagogue three times a week. Howard went to school at P.S. 100 in the Bronx beforegoing on to Brooklyn Technical High School. When he was seven years old, Howard received his first camera and became interested in photography.
Tuesday, April 14, 2015
Haig Baronian’s testimony touches on two important and interrelated dimensions of the Armenian Genocide: the gendered nature of forms and patterns of violence, and the Islamization and incorporation of Armenian women and children into Muslim households and society.

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