Academic Discussions & Lectures

Anatomy of a Genocide

Language: English

Omer Bartov gave a lecture on May 8, 2017, on how the East Galician town of Buczacz was transformed from a site of coexistence, where Poles, Ukrainians, and Jews had lived side-by-side for centuries, into a site of genocide. What were the reasons for this instance of communal violence, what were its dynamics, and why has it been erased from the local memory?

Professor Bartov is the 2017 Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar at USC Center for Advanced Genocide Research.

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Anatomy of a Genocide

Omer Bartov gave a lecture on May 8, 2017, on how the East Galician town of Buczacz was transformed from a site of coexistence, where Poles, Ukrainians, and Jews had lived side-by-side for centuries, into a site of genocide. What were the reasons for this instance of communal violence, what were its dynamics, and why has it been erased from the local memory?

Professor Bartov is the 2017 Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar at USC Center for Advanced Genocide Research.

Collaborators: Exploring Participation in the Holocaust by Non-Germans in Eastern Europe

In this lecture, Professor Alexander Korb explores the phenomenon of collaboration, drawing from a number of country case studies in Eastern and Southeastern Europe. He argues that we need to include Jewish perspectives in order to understand collaboration, because Jews knew their collaborating neighbors much better than the Germans did.

2016 Summer Research Fellows' Presentations

Four of USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research’s summer 2016 research fellows returned to the Institute on Tuesday, April 4, 2017, to share the outcomes of their fellowships and the impact of testimony on their work.

All the fellows are studying or teaching at USC and spent at least several weeks in residence at the Center last summer to conduct research in the Visual History Archive.

Teresa Walch lectures on erasure of Jewish spaces in Nazi Germany

In her public lecture on Feb. 9, 2017, at USC, Robert J. Katz Research Fellow Teresa Walch outlines the process by which Jews in Berlin lost their rights, access to public spaces, ability to move freely, and finally their own homes, from 1933-38. Throughout her talk, Walch refers to the testimonies in the Visual History Archive that she has discovered of Holocaust survivors who describe living through this period and its effect on them.

Benjamin Madley's Lecture on Genocide of California Native Americans

On October 11, 2016, Dr. Benjamin Madley presented a lecture detailing just some of his exhaustive research on the systematic extermination of California’s indigenous population from the first wave of gold rush settlers to the beginning of California’s third decade as an American state. The result of that research is his book An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846-1873.

Barbara Stimler on the Kutno ghetto

Barbara Stimler describes the conditions of the Kutno ghetto in Poland.

2016/04/11 Visiting Scholar Atina Grossmann: Remapping Survival

In this lecture, Professor Atina Grossmann addresses a transnational Holocaust story that remarkably – despite several decades of intensive scholarly and public attention to the history and memory of the Shoah – has remained essentially untold, marginalized in both historiography and commemoration.

2016/03/29 Visiting Scholar Dan Stone Lecture on Concentration Camp

Professor Dan Stone, Royal Holloway, University of London, offered a global perspective of the origins and history of concentration camps.

2016/03/01 CAGR Teaching Fellow Alina Bothe Lecture: "Meeting Survivors Online"

Bothe’s lecture, “Meeting Survivors Online: Negotiating Memory in the Virtual In-Between,” focused on both the theory and practical implications of the “digital turn,” or the rapidly evolving digital landscape that is changing how people interact with the virtual and analog worlds. Her research is centered on the Visual History Archive as a paradigmatic example of this shift in action.

2016/02/11 Greenberg Fellow Lecture by Julia Werner

In this talk, Julia Werner attempts to tell the story of the ghettoization of the Jewish population in Poland through the lenses of several photographic collections combined with interviews from the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive.

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