Our Global Work

Armenia (Link to Wikipedia article)

Thu, 04/02/2015 - 5:45pm -- webmaster

Interviews conducted in Armenia

14

(includes testimonies in the process of being integrated into the Visual History Archive)

Additional work in Armenia

Witnesses for Humanity Collection

  • 2016: All 333 testimonies in the Armenian Genocide collection are indexed and integrated into the Visual History Archive
  • 2015: The Center for Advance Genocide Research acquires over 40 boxes of documents from the historic Martin Marootian et al. v. New York Life Insurance Company class action lawsuit from attorney Vartkes Yeghiayan. The lawsuit represented a historic opportunity to achieve a small measure of justice and public recognition for the 1.5 million victims of the Armenian Genocide. The case was settled in 2004 for $20 million, paving the way for Marootian and other descendants of 2,400 Armenian Genocide victims to finally receive the money they had been owed for nearly 100 years. The settlement also included $3 million earmarked for nine Armenian church and charity groups. The donation marked the first of many collections of genocide trial papers the Center will receive.

  • 2015: USC Shoah Foundation delegation, headed by Executive Director Stephen Smith, attend the official commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide in Yervan, Armenia on April 24, 2015.

  • 2015: The first 60 testimonies of the Armenian Genocide collection are integrated into the Visual History Archive by April 2015, coinciding with the 100th anniversary of the onset of the atrocities.

  • 2014: USC Shoah Foundation receives digitized versions of the 400 testimonies, and raises money to catalogue and index the testimonies so they can be integrated into the Visual History Archive.

  • 2010: USC Shoah Foundation signs a historic agreement with the Armenian Film Foundation, the late Dr. J. Michael Hagopian, and Antoinette Hagopian that paves the way for the preservation and dissemination of the largest collection (400 interviews) of filmed interviews of survivors and witnesses of the Armenian Genocide, the first genocide of the 20th century. These testimonies will be made available for educational purposes through the Institute’s Visual History Archive.