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Robert Wagemann Discusses Medical Treatment of Disabled Children

Robert Wagemann remembers being a physically handicapped child during World War II. Doctors often preferred euthanizing children with physical disabilities rather than keep them alive. Robert describes how his mother helped him escaped a facility, saving his life.

Gay Pride Testimony Series

Eva Heymann on working with gay men in her AIDS work

Eva Heymann, Holocaust survivor and Catholic nun, describes her experience working with the gay community through her AIDS work and how that exposure enabled her to understand her own sexuality in a more complex way than what she was taught in the Catholic Church.

  • Eva Heymann on working with gay men in her AIDS work

    Language: English

    Eva Heymann, Holocaust survivor and Catholic nun, describes her experience working with the gay community through her AIDS work and how that exposure enabled her to understand her own sexuality in a more complex way than what she was taught in the Catholic Church.

  • Marion Pritchard on her early attitude regarding homosexuality

    Language: English

    Marion Pritchard recalls bringing up the topic of homosexuality at the dinner table and how her father took her aside to discuss the importance of tolerance.

  • Susan Dregely on Coming Out

    Language: English

    Susan discusses coming to terms with her identity as a lesbian, and knowing she didn't have to change who she was even while lacking support and resources.

  • Gad Beck on rescuing his lover Manfred Lewin

    Language: German

    Hearing that his lover, Manfred Lewin, has been taken with his family to a transit camp, Gad Beck makes the dangerous choice to go undercover as a Hitler Youth to break Manfred out.

  • Albrecht Becker on gay life in 1934 Germany

    Language: German

    Albrecht Becker recounts the atmosphere for gays in Nazi Germany while Röhm was still in charge of the SA and how the relative freedom he enjoyed during that time changed dramatically after Röhm's assassination in June 1934.

  • Gad Beck on coming out to his family

    Language: German

    In this clip, Gad Beck recalls the day he ran in to tell his mother that he "had his first man" and her surprising reaction. It is a sweet story of family acceptance and support.

  • Bertram Schaffner on helping gay soldiers during World War 2

    Language: English

    Dr. Bertram Schaffner, who served as a military psychiatrist during World War 2, recounts how he dealt with the military's anti-gay policy while evaluating draftees.

  • Kitty Fischer on her rescue by a gay male prisoner

    Language: English

    100 Days to Inspire Respect

    Kitty Fischer recounts her time in Auschwitz-II Birkenau when as a young girl she encounters for the first time a gay male prisoner who will turn out to save her life.

  • Douglas Fox recalls a narrow escape

    Language: English

    Thanks to the quick response of a homosexual prisoner at the Oranienburg-Heinkelwerke labor camp (a subcamp of Sachsenhausen), Douglas Fox escaped from a line of transferred prisoners who were unknowingly being given a lethal injection upon their arrival.

  • Stefan Kosinski on meeting Willi G.

    Language: English

    Stefan recalls the evening of November 4, 1941, when leaving the theater where he worked in Torun, Poland, he encounters a German soldier who turns out to be a man named Willi, his first real romance.

    Foreign words in this video clip:

    • Ersatzkaffee (German): substitute coffee
  • Johan Klisser on hiding

    Language: English

    In this video clip, Johan Klisser recalls when he was 16 years old and separated from his parents in Amsterdam. At one point during his attempt at hiding from the Nazis, he stayed with a gay couple who were part of the Dutch resistance.

German Portal Video Clips

Simon Wiesenthal on the mutual struggle against National Socialism

Recalling his time held in different concentration camps where he met several inhabitants who were not Jewish, Simon Wiesenthal addresses the need to provide a united front in fighting against another recurrence.

  • Simon Wiesenthal on the mutual struggle against National Socialism

    Language: German

    Recalling his time held in different concentration camps where he met several inhabitants who were not Jewish, Simon Wiesenthal addresses the need to provide a united front in fighting against another recurrence.

  • Albrecht Becker on gay life in 1934 Germany

    Language: German

    Albrecht Becker recounts the atmosphere for gays in Nazi Germany while Röhm was still in charge of the SA and how the relative freedom he enjoyed during that time changed dramatically after Röhm's assassination in June 1934.

  • Mietek Pemper on the creation of the Schindler’s list

    Language: German

    Mieczyslaw (Mietek) Pemper typed up the actual Schindler’s list and was saved by Oskar Schindler. Pemper speaks (in German) about Schindler and how he bribed and used personal connections to save hundreds of Jews. Pemper also describes how he came to work with Schindler and help in the creation of the list.

     

  • Albrecht Becker on his arrest

    Language: German

    In this clip from his testimony, Albrecht Becker recalls the circumstances of his arrest and a particular member of the Gestapo by the name of Gerun who may have saved his life.

  • Karl Stojka on Auschwitz

    Language: German

    Karl Stojka was born to a Roma family on April 20, 1931 in Wampersdorf, Lower Austria. His parents Maria Stojka and Karl Horvath travelled as horse traders with their kids in a trailer. Karl had three sisters, Katharina, Margareta, Amalia, and two brothers, Johann and Josef.

    In 1938, the Nazis forced the family Stojka to settle in Vienna. Like his older siblings, Karl went to school until his father was arrested in 1940. From this point on, the anti-Sinti and Roma measures persisted, and in 1943, Karl, his mother and his five siblings were arrested and deported to the Auschwitz II-Birkenau extermination camp. They were housed in the barracks of the Zigeunerlager (German: "Gypsy camp")—part of Birkenau designated for Roma and Sinti prisoners. Karl was forced to work in the quarry and in the canteen, where he was able to steal food for himself and his family. In 1944, he and his brother Johann were transported to the Buchenwald concentration camp and later transferred to the Flossenbürg concentration camp. During the evacuation of Flossenbürg in April 1945, thousands of the camp inmates, including Karl and Johann, were forced to march towards Dachau. The two brothers were able to flee during the death march.

    After his liberation on April 24, 1945 by American troops, Karl Stojka was living as an artist in the United States of America and in Austria. The interview was conducted in Vienna, Austria on April 15, 1998. The interviewer: Eva Ribarits, the cameraman: Oskar Goldberger.

  • Johann Stojka on Auschwitz

    Language: German

    Johann Stojka was born to a Roma family on March 20, 1929 in Vienna, Austria. He spent most of his childhood travelling in a trailer with his parents Maria Stojka, Karl Horvath and his five siblings, Katharina, Karl, Margareta, Amalia and Josef. His parents made a living by trading horses.

    On Nazi command in 1938 the family settled in Vienna, where Johann went to school until his father was arrested in 1940. In 1943, Johann got arrested and transported to the Auschwitz IIBirkenau extermination camp, where he and his family were housed in the barracks of the Zigeunerlager (German: "Gypsy camp")—part of Birkenau designated for Roma and Sinti prisoners. Fourteen years of age, Johann was considered to be fit for work and therefore assigned to compulsory labor. In 1944, he and his brother were first transported to the Buchenwald concentration camp and subsequently transferred to the Flossenbürg concentration camp in 1945. In April of 1945, all inmates of Flossenbürg, including Johann and his brother Karl, were forced to depart the camp under stringent security. Johann and his brother were able to escape the death march and were rescued by American troops on April 24. Johann’s parents and sisters survived as well, his youngest brother died in Auschwitz IIBirkenau of a typhus infection. After liberation Johann Stojka returned to Vienna.

    The interview was conducted in Vienna, Austria on April 22, 1998. The interviewer: Eva Ribarits, the cameraman: Oskar Goldberger.

  • Albrecht Becker on post-war silence about the Holocaust

    Language: German

    Albrecht Becker describes how in the immediate aftermath of liberation Germans, including German Jews, were silent about Nazi atrocities in an attempt to return to a normal as soon as possible.

Ellen Brandt on Jewish identity

Ellen Brandt recalls the implementation of the Nuremberg Laws in Berlin and her participation in a Jewish youth movement BDJJ or Bund Deutsch-Jüdischer Jugend. She also reflects how the organization helped her connect with her Jewish identity.

Discrimination: Peter Braunfeld on Anti-Semitism

Peter Braunfeld recounts experiencing anti-Semitism as a child in Vienna after Austria was annexed by Nazi Germany.  This testimony clip is featured in the new IWitness activity, A thing of the Past? Anti-Semitism Past and Present.

Non-English testimony clips on Auschwitz

Non-English testimony clips on Auschwitz

Nissin Soriano on the intake process at Auschwitz

Jewish survivor Nissin Soriano of Argentina recalls the intake procedures he experienced in Auschwitz. He describes the shaving, numbering, and disinfecting processes.

  • Nissin Soriano on the intake process at Auschwitz

    Language: Spanish

    Jewish survivor Nissin Soriano of Argentina recalls the intake procedures he experienced in Auschwitz. He describes the shaving, numbering, and disinfecting processes.

  • Ina Rabner on the selection process at Auschwitz

    Language: Portuguese

    Jewish survivor Ina Rabner of Brazil remembers the selection process she and the other women prisoners underwent upon their arrival to Auschwitz. She also recalls how, amidst the terrifying process, she saved her sister from execution, hiding her sibling’s graying hair from Mengele.

  • Yehudit Sadeh on recovering after her liberation from Auschwitz

    Language: Hebrew

    Shortly after the Germans fled Auschwitz, well-meaning Russian liberators provided food to children. Tragically, some would die from eating too quickly. Yehudit Sadeh was suffering from dysentery, which proved fortuitous because it prevented her from eating. She describes how a doctor took pains to nurse her back to health until she could walk again and catch a transport back to Czechoslovakia. 

  • Shaul Hazan on being a Sonderkommando

    Language: Hebrew

    Shaul Hazan, who worked as a Sonderkommando at Auschwitz, describes what he witnessed at the crematoriums. He details not only the gruesome cleanup, but also the process the Nazis used to administer the gas.

  • Edgar Wildfeuer about forced labor in Auschwitz

    Language: Spanish

    Edgar Wildfeuer of Argentina speaks of his forced labor assignment in carpentry for the Deutsche Ausrüstungswerke (DAW) Corporation in Auschwitz.

  • Régine JACUBERT

    Language: French

    Régine Jacubert est née le 24 janvier 1920 à Zagorow (Pologne). La famille part pour la France en 1930 et s’installe à Nancy. Réfugiée à Bordeaux avec les siens en 1940, elle rentre seule à Nancy où elle travaille. Le reste de sa famille est arrêté et interné. A Nancy, elle échappe à la grande rafle du 19 juillet 1942 et passe clandestinement en zone Sud. A Lyon, où elle a trouvé un travail, elle entre dans le mouvement de résistance Combat, en janvier 1943. Arrêtée en juin 1944, elle est interrogée à la Gestapo, notamment par Klaus Barbie. Transférée à Drancy, elle est déportée à Auschwitz-Birkenau par le convoi du 31 juillet 1944. Au bout de trois mois, elle est évacuée au camp de Kratzau. Là, elle travaille dans une usine d’armement. Le camp est libéré par l’Armée rouge le 9 mai 1945 et elle rentre en France le 3 juin 1945. A la fin des années 1980, elle témoigne au procès de Klaus Barbie. Elle s’investit pleinement dans le travail de mémoire et la transmission de son expérience auprès des jeunes générations.

  • Karl Stojka on Auschwitz

    Language: German

    Karl Stojka was born to a Roma family on April 20, 1931 in Wampersdorf, Lower Austria. His parents Maria Stojka and Karl Horvath travelled as horse traders with their kids in a trailer. Karl had three sisters, Katharina, Margareta, Amalia, and two brothers, Johann and Josef.

    In 1938, the Nazis forced the family Stojka to settle in Vienna. Like his older siblings, Karl went to school until his father was arrested in 1940. From this point on, the anti-Sinti and Roma measures persisted, and in 1943, Karl, his mother and his five siblings were arrested and deported to the Auschwitz II-Birkenau extermination camp. They were housed in the barracks of the Zigeunerlager (German: "Gypsy camp")—part of Birkenau designated for Roma and Sinti prisoners. Karl was forced to work in the quarry and in the canteen, where he was able to steal food for himself and his family. In 1944, he and his brother Johann were transported to the Buchenwald concentration camp and later transferred to the Flossenbürg concentration camp. During the evacuation of Flossenbürg in April 1945, thousands of the camp inmates, including Karl and Johann, were forced to march towards Dachau. The two brothers were able to flee during the death march.

    After his liberation on April 24, 1945 by American troops, Karl Stojka was living as an artist in the United States of America and in Austria. The interview was conducted in Vienna, Austria on April 15, 1998. The interviewer: Eva Ribarits, the cameraman: Oskar Goldberger.

  • Johann Stojka on Auschwitz

    Language: German

    Johann Stojka was born to a Roma family on March 20, 1929 in Vienna, Austria. He spent most of his childhood travelling in a trailer with his parents Maria Stojka, Karl Horvath and his five siblings, Katharina, Karl, Margareta, Amalia and Josef. His parents made a living by trading horses.

    On Nazi command in 1938 the family settled in Vienna, where Johann went to school until his father was arrested in 1940. In 1943, Johann got arrested and transported to the Auschwitz IIBirkenau extermination camp, where he and his family were housed in the barracks of the Zigeunerlager (German: "Gypsy camp")—part of Birkenau designated for Roma and Sinti prisoners. Fourteen years of age, Johann was considered to be fit for work and therefore assigned to compulsory labor. In 1944, he and his brother were first transported to the Buchenwald concentration camp and subsequently transferred to the Flossenbürg concentration camp in 1945. In April of 1945, all inmates of Flossenbürg, including Johann and his brother Karl, were forced to depart the camp under stringent security. Johann and his brother were able to escape the death march and were rescued by American troops on April 24. Johann’s parents and sisters survived as well, his youngest brother died in Auschwitz IIBirkenau of a typhus infection. After liberation Johann Stojka returned to Vienna.

    The interview was conducted in Vienna, Austria on April 22, 1998. The interviewer: Eva Ribarits, the cameraman: Oskar Goldberger.

  • Ana Benkel de Vinocur

    Language: Spanish

    Ana Benkel de Vinocur describe sus primeras impresiones del campo de concentración Auschwitz II-Birkenau a su llegada del gueto de Lódz en mayo de 1944. Ella recuerda su reacción cuando se abrieron las pesadas compuertas del tren de deportación y vio a los prisioneros vistiendo uniformes rayados, calvos, luciendo como esqueletos. Ella habla de la confiscación de todas sus pertenencias y del proceso de selección durante el cual se mantuvo con su madre, pero fue separada de su padre y hermano.

    Biografía

    Ana Benkel de Vinocur nació el 25 de septiembre de 1926 en Lódz, Polonia. Ana y su familia se mudaron al gueto de Lódz en 1940, donde vivieron bajo condiciones muy duras hasta que fueron deportados al campo de concentración Auschwitz II-Birkenau en 1944. Luego, fue transferida al campo de concentración Stutthoff en Danzig (FC), donde se mantuvo hasta su transferencia en barco por el Mar Báltico, con destino a Alemania. Fue liberada en Kiel, Alemania, a comienzos de mayo de 1945.

  • Zuzana Weiszova

    Language: Czech

    Auschwitz survivor Zuzana Weiszova describes how the fatigued Russian liberators entered the death camp and, after deciphering the Germans were gone, asked survivors if they had any vodka. The Russians cooked a modest feast and shared it with all.

Yehudit Sadeh on recovering after her liberation from Auschwitz

Shortly after the Germans fled Auschwitz, well-meaning Russian liberators provided food to children. Tragically, some would die from eating too quickly. Yehudit Sadeh was suffering from dysentery, which proved fortuitous because it prevented her from eating. She describes how a doctor took pains to nurse her back to health until she could walk again and catch a transport back to Czechoslovakia. 

Edgar Wildfeuer about forced labor in Auschwitz

Edgar Wildfeuer of Argentina speaks of his forced labor assignment in carpentry for the Deutsche Ausrüstungswerke (DAW) Corporation in Auschwitz.

Day 69 of 70 Days of Testimony: Kitty Hart-Moxon remembers the crematoriums

Kitty Hart-Moxon recalls being able to see Crematorium 4 from her barrack window at Auschwitz II-Birkenau.This is the 69th testimony clip in the series 70 Days of Testimony: Leading up to the 70th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz.

Day 66 of 70 Days of Testimony: Marta Wise on Mengele

Marta Wise remembers how she escaped from Josef Mengele’s grim selection, as Russian planes flew overhead and prisoners were forced to scatter. This is the 66th testimony clip in the series 70 Days of Testimony: Leading up to the 70th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz.

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