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Displaying 1 - 8 of 8 results
Monday, February 27, 2017
In her public lecture on Feb. 9, 2017, at USC, Robert J. Katz Research Fellow Teresa Walch outlines the process by which Jews in Berlin lost their rights, access to public spaces, ability to move freely, and finally their own homes, from 1933-38. Throughout her talk, Walch refers to the testimonies in the Visual History Archive that she has discovered of Holocaust survivors who describe living through this period and its effect on them.
Thursday, May 11, 2017
Omer Bartov gave a lecture on May 8, 2017, on how the East Galician town of Buczacz was transformed from a site of coexistence, where Poles, Ukrainians, and Jews had lived side-by-side for centuries, into a site of genocide. What were the reasons for this instance of communal violence, what were its dynamics, and why has it been erased from the local memory? Professor Bartov is the 2017 Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar at USC Center for Advanced Genocide Research.
Friday, September 15, 2017
Historian and filmmaker Christian Delage (Institut D’Histoire Du Temps Présent, Paris) gave a public lecture at the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research focusing on analysis of different forms of testimony — in war crimes trials, oral history repositories, and documentary - and his recent project collecting interviews about the November 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris.
Tuesday, October 17, 2017
In the immediate aftermath of the Armenian genocide, thousands of Armenian survivors recorded testimonies detailing the atrocities they witnessed at the hands of the Ottoman Turks during World War I. And yet it wouldn’t be until the 1990s before historians would begin taking these oral histories seriously.
Tuesday, October 24, 2017
In this lecture, Dr. Boris Adjemian speaks about the making of Armenian archival collections of victims' testimonies after the genocide and the evolution of their historiographical uses.
Thursday, November 16, 2017
Alexander Hinton discussed his new book Man or Monster? The Trial of a Khmer Rouge Torturer. In his book, Professor Hinton uses creative ethnographic writing, extensive fieldwork, hundreds of interviews, and his experience attending Duch's trial to create a nuanced analysis of Duch, the tribunal, the Khmer Rouge, and the after-effects of Cambodia's genocide.
Wednesday, November 29, 2017
In this lecture, Irina Rebrova discusses her research on the process of remembrance and translation of the memory about the Holocaust in the North Caucasus, South of Russia. She studies the mechanism of storytelling by Holocaust survivors interviewed by the Shoah Foundation in the early Post-Soviet states in the 1990s.
Wednesday, November 29, 2017
In this lecture, Professor Geraldien von Frijtag Drabbe Künzel explores Jewish-gentile relations in the Netherlands in the years just before, during and just after the Holocaust.