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Friday, March 8, 2013
USC Shoah Foundation – The Institute for Visual History and Education co-sponsored a March 7 lecture by Dr. Cathy J. Schlund-Vials on the memory work of Cambodian Americans whose films, memoirs, and music represent a largely unexamined site of critique on Cambodian memory in the aftermath of genocide.
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
Throughout August 1944 the Lodz ghetto was liquidated until almost all the ghetto inhabitants were finally deported to Auschwitz. Philip Ravski recalls the liquidation and how his family evaded deporation until the end of August.
Tuesday, August 12, 2014
Carl Wilkens speaks on recording audio memoirs while living in Rwanda during the 1994 genocide. His reasoning for recording the messages wasn’t necessarily to document what was happening but the recording would be an audio diary for his family in case he didn’t survive.
Friday, September 26, 2014
Phyllis Karp describes her encounter with Oskar Schindler after World War II. While she was not friends with Schindler personally, her husband Irwin was acquainted with him because of his working relationship with Schindler's close friend, Julius Madristch. She also describes the impact that Emilie Schindler, Oskar's wife, had on the Jewish community.
Monday, October 13, 2014
Aniko Friedberg describes how she would create sculptures out of clay while interned in the Allendorf forced labor camp, a subcamp of Buchenwald. She didn’t recall this memory until she reunited with former prisoners, who remembered her sculptures, decades later.
Friday, October 17, 2014
I adored my father and admired him greatly. Harold Eisenberg was a good man in every sense of the word. He spoke about his life in Opatow, Poland before World War II and even his experience during the Holocaust, but he also lived very much in the present, working hard to provide for his family. The business he started after the war became the foundation for much of our extended family’s success. I was named for his mother and his sister, who both perished in the Holocaust, and my father would often look at me tenderly and tell me how much I reminded him of his mother. 
Friday, October 17, 2014
Kaja Finkler speaks admirably of her mother, a student of modern thought despite her orthodox Jewish background. Kaja recalls how her mother studied law in pre-war Poland with Raphael Lemkin, who later coined the term genocide.
Tuesday, October 28, 2014
Elżbieta Ficowska, a Jewish survivor from Poland, speaks about her experience, so she will continue to remember her parents and other loved ones that perished in the Holocaust. Ficowska describes how there isn’t any physical trace of her parents except for a grave stone she found on a Warsaw Jewish cemetery. Her birth certificate is a silver tee spoon engraved with her name and birthdate, which her father gave to her babysitter on “Aryan side” of Warsaw.
Wednesday, November 5, 2014
For some people, hope is nothing but an airy dream. But for my parents, Elisabeth and George, it is a hard-won reality that they have lived every day of their lives. Their commitment is anything but naïve. They are both survivors of the Holocaust and have experienced anti-Semitism in all its forms. They’ve suffered more than most of us, God willing, will ever experience. And yet, their hope has been a source of redemption and new life.
Friday, November 7, 2014
Miriam Ziegler recalls how she reunited with other Holocaust survivors after she immigrated to Toronto. She also reflects on the famous photo of herself and other the children of Auschwitz photographed by Russian liberators.  
Monday, January 19, 2015
Auschwitz should never have existed, so why are we so keen to cling onto it? Would it not be reasonable to scrub it from the landscape, remove the very thought of what it represents from our minds, recognize it as the cemetery it is, then grass it over and leave the dead to rest in peace?  
Wednesday, January 21, 2015
Anita Lasker-Wallfisch had a lucky moment while being processed at the Sauna in Auschwitz-Birkenau.  One of the girls processing her asked her what she did prior to landing in that place of unspeakable horror. “I played the cello,” she answered. That surreal conversation, not far from the gas chambers at Birkenau, would save her life.  As a member of the Auschwitz women's orchestra, playing the cello meant respite from heavy labor.  
Thursday, February 5, 2015
“My father is Jewish.  My mother is Jewish. And I am Jewish.”  Those were the words I kept repeating to myself as I boarded my flight from JFK to attend the 70th anniversary commemoration of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau.
Thursday, May 7, 2015
Edith Umugiraneza was born and raised in Rwanda and survived the 1994 Rwandan Tutsi Genocide but lost most of her family including her mother. Edith wrote this poem not only as an ode to her mother but as a promise to continue her mother's work of helping others.
Tuesday, November 3, 2015
About a year after I joined USC Shoah Foundation, I was invited to be the keynote speaker at the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre’s Holocaust Education Week in Toronto. The theme that year was about memory and they had graciously invited me, the new Director of Education, to discuss memory in the context of the Institute’s education platform IWitness and testimony-based education.
Tuesday, June 14, 2016
“Oskar Schindler saved my life but Steven Spielberg gave me a voice,” Holocaust survivor Celina Biniaz.
Monday, June 24, 2019
Badema Pitic, a project specialist with the Institute's Center for Advanced Genocide Research, is presenting a paper on her research "Remembering Home: Songs of Longing in Trans-local and Transnational Communities of Eastern Bosnians" at the annual conference of the Memory Studies Association at Complutense University Madrid in Spain. The conference runs from June 25-28.      
Wednesday, October 1, 2014
Branko Lustig, producer of Schindler’s List and the 50,000th interviewee in the Visual History Archive, recalls returning to Auschwitz during the filming of the TV mini-series War and Remembrance.