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Thursday, November 30, 2017
After two years of cursory research and interest, Martin Gruber was able to start a full-time job as USC Shoah Foundation’s 2017 Austrian Holocaust Memorial Service intern this October, one entire year early. And he couldn’t be more pleased.
Monday, November 6, 2017
Just a couple weeks after attending USC Shoah Foundation’s Intercollegiate Diversity Congress (IDC) Summit, DePauw University Student Body President Erika Killion already has a plan for incorporating testimony clips and other USC Shoah Foundation educational resources into campus activities.
Thursday, November 9, 2017
Fresh off of USC Shoah Foundation’s Intercollegiate Diversity Congress (IDC) Summit, Memphis University Student Body Vice President Kevyanna Rawls has some new expectations for her school. With testimony clips and other USC Shoah Foundation educational resources gleaned from the Summit, she’ll have plenty with which to make an impact.
Tuesday, November 28, 2017
A month after USC Shoah Foundation’s Intercollegiate Diversity Congress (IDC) Summit, Georgia State University Student Government Executive Vice President Jesse Calixte is still buzzing with ideas on how to make his university, the fourth most diverse in the country, more inclusive for all its students. Armed with testimony clips and other USC Shoah Foundation educational tools he obtained during the Summit, Calixte will have plenty with which to make an impact. “Going to this summit was one of my best decisions so far as a student leader,” Calixte said.
Wednesday, November 15, 2017
Among the student leaders from across the country who attended USC Shoah Foundation’s inaugural Intercollegiate Diversity Congress (IDC) Summit in October were two representatives from USC itself. One was Kara Watkins-Chow, who came away from the summit with new ideas and insight to take back to her role as president of the Queer & Ally Student Association.
Thursday, November 2, 2017
Grand View University is a liberal arts college in Des Moines, Iowa, with a student body of about 2,000. At such a small school, said its student body president Kendall Antle, it’s true: everybody seems to know everybody. But the small-town feel does come with its disadvantages. “One major issue we face is apathy,” Antle said. “You have cliques. People have a tendency to stay with whom they know and work with whom they know.”