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Thursday, May 11, 2017
The first-ever recipient of USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research’s Genocide Prevention Research Fellowship is Vanessa Belén Dorda Meneses, a PhD candidate from the University of Chile.
Friday, June 2, 2017
The new program includes a toolkit on IWitness and an diversity summit in winter 2017.
Thursday, June 15, 2017
IWitness Video Challenge winner Alana Chandler gravitated toward the subject of identity in her project because she has always grappled with her own. Growing up Jewish and Japanese (and attending a Jewish middle school and Japanese Saturday school), Alana said she often felt torn between the two sides of her identity. At the middle school, kids joked about her Japanese heritage, and at Saturday school, kids expressed confusion about her religion.
Monday, June 19, 2017
Yu Jing Chen, a rising senior at Walter Payton College Preparatory High School in Chicago, teamed up with two classmates to produce the grand prize-winning entry of the 2017 IWitness Video Challenge.
Monday, August 21, 2017
Less than a week after the neo-Nazi rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, USC Shoah Foundation received a call from Blake Humphrey, student body president of West Virginia University. How could he work with USC Shoah Foundation to speak out against this blatant display of hatred and bigotry?
Tuesday, August 22, 2017
LOS ANGELES - Aug. 22, 2017 – The violent antisemitic and racist hatred seen in Charlottesville, Virginia, earlier this month combined Nazi ideology with white supremacy and drew from the dark historical legacies of the Holocaust and slavery. This hatred revealed the fissures of a long-standing American cultural and identity crisis that requires long-term strategies to provide safe ways to explore identity and difference.
Thursday, January 26, 2017
The Holocaust is inarguably the most heinous crime against a group of people we have seen in modern times. Despite decades of wrestling with how such an atrocity could have occurred and the postwar generation promising never again, history keeps repeating itself. Therefore, the collection and the custody of testimonies from those who bear witness remains a necessary task for as long as inhumanities keep occurring. Genocide and crimes against humanity transcend religions, cultures, languages, geographic regions, socioeconomics, gender, age, etc., making testimony collection across all cultures not only a moral responsibility, but imperative given the mission of USC Shoah Foundation. We know for sure that under a certain set of circumstances, genocide could happen anywhere, and again.
Thursday, February 9, 2017
USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research is currently accepting applications for nearly every one of its research and teaching fellowships.
Monday, April 17, 2017
All of USC Shoah Foundation’s educational resources about the Armenian Genocide can now be found in a new one-stop shop on the IWitness website that launched today, one week before the 102nd anniversary of the Armenian Genocide.
Thursday, June 22, 2017
USC Shoah Foundation Chief Technology Officer Sam Gustman will give a talk at the annual American Libraries Association conference this Saturday in Chicago.
Friday, June 30, 2017
In this series, we take a closer look at the new features and resources coming to IWitness in time for the 2017-2018 school year.
Thursday, July 6, 2017
USC Shoah Foundation was invited to give a presentation about its IWalk program at Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum’s international education conference, “Awareness-Responsibility-Future,” earlier this week.
Thursday, July 27, 2017
​IWitness was a featured component of three training sessions hosted by the Holocaust Educators Network (HEN) this month.
Thursday, September 21, 2017
The Ways to Inspire Respect Professional Development series launching today will engage with real-world issues that teachers face in classrooms, such as cultural conflict, lack of dialogue or inappropriate dialogue, and confusion around issues of identity that can quickly escalate in schools and distract from curricular goals.
Thursday, November 9, 2017
IWitness has gathered a variety of multimedia resources to help teachers teach and students learn about the new film The Promise, a historical fiction film that conveys a multi-perspective history of the Armenian Genocide.
Monday, December 11, 2017
A public lecture by Kathryn Brackney (PhD candidate in History, Yale University) 2017-2018 Katz Research Fellow in Genocide Studies
Wednesday, January 18, 2017
Join us for #IWitnessChat on Wednesday Jan. 25, 2017 at 4pm PT/ 7pm ET to discuss how you teach with primary sources inluding testimony and diaries in your classroom. This chat will be hosted by 7th grade social studies educator Tracy Sockalosky. @tsocko
Tuesday, January 31, 2017
Join us for #IWitnessChat on Wednesday Feb. 8, 2017 at 4pm PT/ 7pm ET to discuss how you teach with testimony to increase your students' digital citizenship for upcoming Digital Learning Day. 
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
Following the success of two visits by the Holocaust Geographies Collaborative research group to USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research, the next recipients of the annual Interdisciplinary Research Week fellowship have been chosen.
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
Join USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research for a Facebook live interview with 2016-2017 Margee and Douglas Greenberg Research Fellow Katja Schatte.
Tuesday, March 7, 2017
English Translation of testimony clip: “The February Revolution, - that’s how I perceived it being a girl, - was a celebration. It was a fraternization! It was a jubilation! The bonds of an old order were broken: [before] you were not allowed to do this and that. If you were a nobleman, you were allowed to do everything, but if you were a burgess, you were deprived of everything. There were a lot of ties and bonds. But [the Revolution], it was such a liberation and joy! [People] were fraternizing!”
Tuesday, March 21, 2017
S.J. Crasnow, USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research's Academic Outreach and Research Program Officer, will lead this introductory workshop about the Visual History Archive.
Tuesday, March 21, 2017
The workshop will cover the history of the archive, strategies for searching the testimonies, and examples of how the VHA has been used in classroom teaching.
Tuesday, May 2, 2017
Too often, as has become glaringly apparent in our current national climate, an emphasis on difference has potential for creating misunderstandings that lead to violence. Developing empathy will help students see others as human--individuals with feelings, beliefs, reasons--regardless of ethnicity, gender, and ideology. As a result of this webinar, participants will: Learn the guidelines for using audiovisual testimony to develop affective recognition in students
Thursday, June 1, 2017
A thematic seminar that will interweave content related to both the Holocaust and present-day experiences of intolerance and persecution. The seminar is inquiry-based, inviting teachers to acknowledge and incorporate the culture of their students into their curriculum and the broader classroom experience. The program takes a writing based approach to Holocaust and social justice education. Speakers and events will include:
Monday, July 17, 2017
Shayna Kantor turned her passion for American Sign Language into her third-place winning IWitness Video Challenge project.
Thursday, July 20, 2017
IWitness launched a new portal, Student Leaders, in June, dedicated to providing student leaders with testimony-based resources to help foster inclusivity and acceptance on college campuses.
Tuesday, August 1, 2017
A public lecture by Christian Delage (Director of the Institut D’Histoire Du Temps Présent, Paris)                    
Tuesday, September 5, 2017
Each week, we will profile a scholar who will present his or her research at the Center for Advanced Genocide Research's upcoming conference Digital Approaches to Genocide Studies, Oct. 23-24, 2017.
Thursday, September 21, 2017
It’s well-documented that family units were disrupted and displaced during the Holocaust – but just how affected were they, and were they able to reconvene following the war?

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