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Displaying 1 - 9 of 9 results
Thursday, September 14, 2017
Evgeniia Fizdel was born in 1923 in Odessa, then Ukrainian Socialist Soviet Republic (today Odesa, Ukraine). She lived with her parents in Odessa when in August 1937 her father, Adol’f Fizdel, was arrested as a “German spy” and sent to a Soviet concentration camp. In 1940, he was released from the camp. When the Germans invaded the Soviet Union in 1941, Evgeniia evacuated to Ufa, a city in the Urals, where she continued her medical training. In 1944, she was drafted into the Soviet army and as a military doctor and participated in the liberation of Poland and Germany.
Friday, February 24, 2017
100 Days to Inspire Respect Paul reflects on his hope that his testimony, and all of the testimonies collected by USC Shoah Foundation, can help teach respect to future generations.
Thursday, March 9, 2017
100 Days to Inspire Respect Renee Firestone is a Holocaust survivor who was interviewed by USC Shoah Foundation and went on to become an interviewer herself. She discusses the interviewing process and describes how listening to testimony is an emotional experience.
Thursday, October 19, 2017
Holocaust survivor Miriam Ziegler describes her liberation from Auschwitz, first in her testimony for the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in 1987 and then in her USC Shoah Foundation testimony in 1994.
Monday, July 31, 2017
Ernest begins his testimony by sharing a story about his father that has affected him his whole life.
Thursday, June 29, 2017
Holocaust survivor Max Buchbinder gives his final memories and pays tribute to his deceased family members at the end of his testimony.
Thursday, October 19, 2017
Holocaust survivor Pinchas Gutter describes how he, his mother and sister took the train to Warsaw posing as Christians - which meant that Pinchas's long payos, or sidelocks, needed to be cut. Pinchas describes the experience first in his testimony for the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in 1993, and then in his testimony for USC Shoah Foundation in 1995.
Thursday, March 2, 2017
100 Days to Inspire Respect Emmanuel Muhinda describes the persecution of Tutsi and anti-Tutsi propaganda he witnessed before the genocide started in April 1994. His testimony is featured in the IWitness activity, Information Quest: The Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda.
Tuesday, March 7, 2017
English Translation of testimony clip: “The February Revolution, - that’s how I perceived it being a girl, - was a celebration. It was a fraternization! It was a jubilation! The bonds of an old order were broken: [before] you were not allowed to do this and that. If you were a nobleman, you were allowed to do everything, but if you were a burgess, you were deprived of everything. There were a lot of ties and bonds. But [the Revolution], it was such a liberation and joy! [People] were fraternizing!”