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Friday, April 15, 2016
Ukrainian survivor Alexander Contract reflects on the Holocaust and the terrible atrocities that the world faced and continues to face all around the world. He hopes that all people can live in peace across the world.
Tuesday, April 7, 2015
Historians continue to debate the extent of German responsibility for the Armenian Genocide in 1915. The Ottoman Empire was an ally of Germany during WWI (1914- 1918). During the war, Germany was blamed for the Armenian Genocide. Historian Arnold Toynbee in his widely read pamphlet Armenian Atrocities published in 1915 “indicted” Germany for what he called a “shameful and terrible page of modern history” in Armenia.
Thursday, September 14, 2017
Evgeniia Fizdel was born in 1923 in Odessa, then Ukrainian Socialist Soviet Republic (today Odesa, Ukraine). She lived with her parents in Odessa when in August 1937 her father, Adol’f Fizdel, was arrested as a “German spy” and sent to a Soviet concentration camp. In 1940, he was released from the camp. When the Germans invaded the Soviet Union in 1941, Evgeniia evacuated to Ufa, a city in the Urals, where she continued her medical training. In 1944, she was drafted into the Soviet army and as a military doctor and participated in the liberation of Poland and Germany.
Tuesday, April 14, 2015
Haig Baronian’s testimony touches on two important and interrelated dimensions of the Armenian Genocide: the gendered nature of forms and patterns of violence, and the Islamization and incorporation of Armenian women and children into Muslim households and society.
Friday, April 25, 2014
Abraham Zuckerman was saved by Oskar Schindler, when he was selected to work in Schindler’s factory. Zuckerman reflects on his decision to give his testimony and the importance of collecting survivor and eyewitness testimonies to the Holocaust.
Thursday, March 27, 2014
Roman Kent acknowledges the contribution of the “Righteous Gentiles” who put their own lives on the line in order to save Jews during the Holocaust.  Kent’s testimony is featured in Testimony – The Legacy of Schindler’s List and the USC Shoah Foundation.
Thursday, July 24, 2014
Henry Rosmarin remembers when he was called into the commandant’s quarters at Dyhernfurth concentration camp in Germany late one night and told to play a musical piece by Schubert on the harmonica. Henry credits his musical skills on saving his life. Henry’s testimony clip is featured in the book, Testimony – The Legacy of Schindler’s List and the USC Shoah Foundation.  
Thursday, November 12, 2015
Liberator Morton Barrish talks about his reasoning for giving testimony, largely because he wanted to educate the younger generation and make the story of the Holocaust very well known.
Tuesday, April 5, 2016
Holocaust rescuer Irene Opdyke gave her testimony to Jewish Family and Children's Services of San Francisco in 1993 and again to USC Shoah Foundation in 1995. Here, she speaks in each interview about why she shares her story.
Thursday, April 9, 2015
Roman Ferber explains why it is so important for him and other Holocaust survivors to speak about their experiences.
Monday, June 15, 2015
Martin Aaron reflects on the importance of sharing his experience of the Holocaust even though it is very difficult.
Wednesday, April 1, 2015
Prof. Richard Hovannisian on the life and testimony of Alice Muggerditchian Shipley. This is the third testimony in the Armenian Genocide Testimony series.
Thursday, April 2, 2015
Prof. Richard Hovannisian describes the life of Armenian Genocide survivor Ashrag Dickranian. This is the fourth testimony in the Armenian Genocide Testimony clip series.
Friday, April 3, 2015
Over the last several years, I’ve had the distinct privilege to work with the recorded materials collected by the late Dr. J Michael Hagopian. A survivor of the Armenian Genocide himself, Michael had the foresight to capture the voices of those who witnessed the atrocities first hand.  Later this month, the USC Shoah Foundation will make a group of 60 of these interviews available through the Visual History Archive, ensuring that these recollections will be preserved in perpetuity, for future generations.  Michael would have certainly been proud to witness this accomplishment.
Friday, April 3, 2015
After the disastrous Balkan wars of 1912-13, the Turks lost most of their European possessions. To dilute the Armenian presence and create a homogenous Turkish and Muslim population that would unequivocally support the Turkish state, the Young Turks decided on a policy of resettling Muslim refugees from the Balkan wars in Armenian areas and deporting the indigenous population.  These early measures led to the impoverishment and death of thousands; then came the First World War with Turkey taking the side of Germany against Russia and its allies.
Friday, January 8, 2016
Benjamin Oudkerk says that he decided to give his testimony so that his grandchildren could hear his story, and also to share how the kindness of one family saved his life.
Wednesday, April 22, 2015
In the spring of 1915, the Young Turk regime of the Ottoman began a genocide against its Armenian population under the cover of World War I. This minute-long excerpt features survivor Haroutune Aivazian.  He describes the horror his mother faced when a town crier in Marash, a city in Cilcia in South West Anatolia, called for the Armenians of the community to gather in a square just outside of the town for deportation. As his mother prepared for the journey, a local Turkish man warned the family that deportation meant death.
Tuesday, April 28, 2015
100 Days to Inspire Respect In every genocide, in spite of the horror of human killing and the danger that poses, there are remarkable people that come to the fore.  Armin T. Wegner was in the German Sanitary Corps and was posted to Eastern Turkey during WWI.  There he was witness to the genocide of the Armenian people. Seeing the devastating consequences of the deportations he documented the genocide in photographs, keeping meticulous notes at great personal risk.
Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Professor Richard Hovannisian provides commentary for the testimony clip of Jirair Suchiasian.
Friday, February 24, 2017
100 Days to Inspire Respect Paul reflects on his hope that his testimony, and all of the testimonies collected by USC Shoah Foundation, can help teach respect to future generations.
Monday, April 15, 2019
Holocaust Liberator Paul Parks on the futility of hatred and his hope that the testimonies collected by USC Shoah Foundation will help teach future generations respect.
Thursday, March 9, 2017
100 Days to Inspire Respect Renee Firestone is a Holocaust survivor who was interviewed by USC Shoah Foundation and went on to become an interviewer herself. She discusses the interviewing process and describes how listening to testimony is an emotional experience.
Tuesday, July 26, 2016
Helen Colin's daughter Muriel explains how their family first discovered the interview her mother gave at the liberation of Bergen-Belsen. Helen says she shares her story so that future generations can learn from it. This is part of the follow-up interview Helen gave to USC Shoah Foundation in June 2016.
Monday, March 30, 2015
Professor Richard Hovannisian explains the emotion expressed in the eyewitness testimonies to the Armenian Genocide is what sets the Armenian Genocide Testimony Collection at USC Shoah Foundation apart from other written and audio testimony collections.
Friday, April 3, 2015
Prof. Richard Hovannisian describes the life of Armenian Genocide survivor Elsie Hagopian Taft. This is the fifth testimony in the Armenian Genocide Testimony clip series. 
Thursday, April 23, 2015
In 1968, filmmaker J. Michael Hagopian received a phone call as he describes in this clip, from a German, who had apparently been stationed in a medical corps in the Ottoman Empire in 1915/1916 and witnessed what happened to Armenians. Michael had not heard of this person before, but knew right away that this could be an important interview. Why?
Friday, April 10, 2015
When Michael Hagopian made his first classic acclaimed documentary on the Armenian Genocide in 1975, nominated for two Emmys, he titled the film “The Forgotten Genocide.” Since then decades have passed and hundreds of publications in a variety of languages have been written on the subject. The Armenian Genocide has now taken its rightfully important place within the field of genocide studies. It is not a “forgotten genocide” anymore, despite the existence of a denialist State - Turkey, which has developed denialism into an Industry.
Friday, April 17, 2015
Levon Giridlian was born in Ottoman Empire, in Kayseri (Armenian: Kesaria) in the region of Cappadocia. Kayseri had once been a major Christian center, as attested by the numerous chapels hewn into the mountainous terrain. Although not a part of the historic Armenian highlands to the east, the county of Kayseri at the end of the nineteenth century had about 70,000 Armenian inhabitants, active in agriculture, the crafts and trades, and, among them, a significant number of regional and international merchants.
Friday, April 24, 2015
Michael Hagopian conducted almost all of the interviews in the Armenian Genocide Testimony collection.  After he died in December 2010, the Armenian Film Foundation received a request to interview Almas Boghosian, in Whitinsville, Massachusetts. Her granddaughter Taline had interviewed her in 2000, but her family wanted Almas to be interviewed again for this collection. I called a cameraman I knew from my previous work with the BBC and we went to Almas’ house, and met Almas’ grandson Bruce Boghosian and his wife, Laura.  
Monday, April 6, 2015
The noted Armenian hero General Antranig Ozanian, was born on February 25, 1865, and died on August 31, 1927. He spent the final years of his life living quietly with his wife in Fresno, California.General Antranig was the most well-known of Armenian freedom fighters in the twentieth century, and his exploits are remembered by Armenians throughout the world. General Antranig is buried today at the Yerablur cemetery in Yerevan, Armenia.

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