Search

Displaying 1 - 12 of 12 results
Thursday, May 11, 2017
Omer Bartov gave a lecture on May 8, 2017, on how the East Galician town of Buczacz was transformed from a site of coexistence, where Poles, Ukrainians, and Jews had lived side-by-side for centuries, into a site of genocide. What were the reasons for this instance of communal violence, what were its dynamics, and why has it been erased from the local memory? Professor Bartov is the 2017 Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar at USC Center for Advanced Genocide Research.
Tuesday, April 24, 2018
Christopher Browning, the 2018 Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar in Residence at USC Shoah Foundation’s Center for Advanced Genocide Research, talks about the changing attitudes about witness testimony and how the process of gathering it has changed since the end of World War II.
Monday, August 26, 2013
March 25, 2010: This plenary session follows up on earlier breakout sessions that addressed issues related to how context, teaching methodologies, and teaching objectives differ based on course discipline. This session is moderated by Mark Baker (Associate Professor, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia). One representative from each of the four groups reports on:
Wednesday, February 28, 2018
This lecture features two of our summer 2017 research fellows: Maria Zalewska, PhD candidate in Cinema and Media Studies and Mellon PhD Fellow in the Digital Humanities, USC School of Cinematic Arts, and Noha Ayoub, USC undergraduate student majoring in Law, History and Culture and minoring in Middle East Studies.
Monday, August 26, 2013
March 26, 2010: Audio-visual testimonies of traumatic historical events arouse profound emotions in their viewers. The pedagogical questions raised in this session focuses on the appropriateness and/or usefulness of emotionality in teaching about the Holocaust.
Monday, August 26, 2013
March 25, 2010: Since the Institute’s testimonies were given around 50 years after the events described, researchers must confront issues of memory and reliability. In this session moderated by Andrea Pető (Associate Professor, Gender Studies, Central European University), Robert Rozett, (Director of Yad Vashem Libraries) addresses problems that revolve around memory and reliability. He asks whether testimonies and memoirs bring us closer than other kinds of historical documents to understanding what people went through.
Wednesday, April 10, 2019
In this lecture, Gabór Tóth discusses the ways text and data mining technology has helped to recover fragments of the lost experiences of murdered Holocaust victims out of oral history interviews with survivors.
Tuesday, October 24, 2017
In this lecture, Dr. Boris Adjemian speaks about the making of Armenian archival collections of victims' testimonies after the genocide and the evolution of their historiographical uses.
Friday, September 15, 2017
Historian and filmmaker Christian Delage (Institut D’Histoire Du Temps Présent, Paris) gave a public lecture at the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research focusing on analysis of different forms of testimony — in war crimes trials, oral history repositories, and documentary - and his recent project collecting interviews about the November 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris.
Thursday, January 31, 2019
In this lecture, 2018 Beth and Arthur Lev Student Research Fellow Virginia Bullington will reflect on research she conducted last summer at the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research analyzing how testimonies from the Armenian, Guatemalan and Rwandan genocides regarding sexual violence are constructed by interviewees, and how these narratives influence and are influenced by contemporary concepts of gender in those societies post-conflict.
Monday, April 8, 2019
In this lecture, Hovannisian discusses the origins and development of his course at UCLA on Armenian oral history, as well as the uses and potential misuses of oral testimony. His former students Lorna Touryan Miller, Tamar Mashigian and Salpi Ghazarian share their own impressions and experiences in adding to the collection. 
Monday, February 27, 2017
In her public lecture on Feb. 9, 2017, at USC, Robert J. Katz Research Fellow Teresa Walch outlines the process by which Jews in Berlin lost their rights, access to public spaces, ability to move freely, and finally their own homes, from 1933-38. Throughout her talk, Walch refers to the testimonies in the Visual History Archive that she has discovered of Holocaust survivors who describe living through this period and its effect on them.