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Saturday, December 12, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation is honoring the 78th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre today by returning to Nanjing to record 20 new testimonies for its Nanjing Massacre collection.
Wednesday, July 20, 2016
The 22 new testimonies will bring the total number in the Nanjing Massacre collection to 72.
Tuesday, June 7, 2016
USC Shoah Foundation staff are currently in Nanjing, China, to record about 20 more testimonies of Nanjing Massacre survivors.
Wednesday, December 18, 2013
On the heels of USC Shoah Foundation’s new partnership with the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall to collect and preserve testimony of Nanjing Massacre survivors, the educational platform Facing History and Ourselves signed an agreement to integrate three of those testimonies into its own educational materials.
Friday, October 28, 2016
Madame Xia Shuqin, child survivor of the 1937 Nanjing Massacre, traveled from Nanjing, China, to Los Angeles this week to film an interview for USC Shoah Foundation’s New Dimensions in Testimony (NDT) project.
Thursday, September 14, 2017
The museum staff and students were among the first to see the NDT testimony of Nanjing Massacre survivor Madame Xia Shuqin.
Tuesday, December 12, 2017
On the 80th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre today, the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall in Nanjing, China, debuted its permanent exhibition of New Dimensions in Testimony (NDT), USC Shoah Foundation’s interactive survivor testimony technology.
Friday, February 28, 2014
USC Shoah Foundation’s newest testimony collection, the Nanjing Massacre, is now fully integrated and viewable in the Visual History Archive.
Friday, November 20, 2015
Director of Research and Documentation Karen Jungblut hosted a visit from several Nanjing Massacre scholars this week to introduce the work of the Institute and discuss future partnerships.
Wednesday, December 11, 2013
USC Shoah Foundation and Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall have embarked on a historic effort to preserve the testimonies of the last survivors of the 1937 Nanjing Massacre, also known as the Rape of Nanjing.
Friday, December 20, 2013
Executive director Stephen Smith highlights just a few of USC Shoah Foundation's 2013 achievements.
Monday, January 12, 2015
Three months after collecting 18 new testimonies for USC Shoah Foundation’s Nanjing Massacre collection, Karen Jungblut, director of research and documentation, returned to Nanjing, China, to observe the National Day of Remembrance of the Nanjing Massacre and meet with survivors and partners.
Thursday, December 12, 2013
On the 76th anniversary of the start of the Nanjing Massacre, a commemoration was held including the last remaining survivors, some of whom gave their testimony, which will be a part of the Nanjing collection in the USC Shoah Foundation's Visual History Archive.
Wednesday, January 15, 2014
USC Shoah Foundation added a new country and language to the Visual History Archive and surpassed 20,000 IWitness users in the last quarter of 2013.
Thursday, October 9, 2014
I recently returned to China to record audio-visual testimonies from survivors of the 1937 Nanjing Massacre. In February 2014, the Institute incorporated 12 Nanjing testimonies into its Visual History Archive, adding a new perspective to the 53,000 testimonies that we collected from the Holocaust and the Rwandan Tutsi Genocide.
Friday, December 12, 2014
Former USC Shoah Foundation Executive Director Douglas Greenberg's Comparative Genocide course at Rutgers University has had a profound effect on his students.
Friday, December 13, 2013
As I write this, I am standing alongside 30 of the last 200 survivors of the Nanjing Massacre, which began 76 years ago Friday. Sirens sound around this Chinese city as the last few eyewitnesses of a massacre gather. Starting Dec. 13, 1937, and lasting six weeks, as many as 300,000 civilians were murdered during the atrocities.
Thursday, January 26, 2017
The Holocaust is inarguably the most heinous crime against a group of people we have seen in modern times. Despite decades of wrestling with how such an atrocity could have occurred and the postwar generation promising never again, history keeps repeating itself. Therefore, the collection and the custody of testimonies from those who bear witness remains a necessary task for as long as inhumanities keep occurring. Genocide and crimes against humanity transcend religions, cultures, languages, geographic regions, socioeconomics, gender, age, etc., making testimony collection across all cultures not only a moral responsibility, but imperative given the mission of USC Shoah Foundation. We know for sure that under a certain set of circumstances, genocide could happen anywhere, and again.
Friday, October 30, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation executive staff, supporters and partners met in China this week for the 2015 USC Global Conference, where they shared the Institute’s mission and newest projects with an international audience.