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Wednesday, October 26, 2016
In an effort to create a deeper engagement with educators online, USC Shoah Foundation’s IWitness hosts Twitter chats on the 2nd and 4th Wednesday of every month. Meet fellow IWitness educators, share best practices, ask questions directly to the IWitness team and join the IWitness community.
Friday, May 17, 2013
Closing the Digital Divide An Interview with Comcast Chairman & CEO Brian L. Roberts When Everything Changed Holocaust survivor and filmmaker Branko Lustig Scholarship in a Digital World Tara McPherson on new modes of publishing and more…
Monday, March 24, 2014
As part of the USC School of Cinematic Arts Visible Evidence XVI Conference, the USC Shoah Foundation Institute hosted a panel discussion and audience participatory Q&A session on issues related to conducting interviews with genocide survivors for use in documentary film and what happens to the body of footage after its initial use.The participants were (alphabetical order): Anne Aghion (NYC), Ted Braun (LA), Andi Gitow (Panel Moderator) (NYC), James Moll (LA), Socheata Poeuv (New Haven).
Wednesday, April 22, 2015
In the spring of 1915, the Young Turk regime of the Ottoman began a genocide against its Armenian population under the cover of World War I. This minute-long excerpt features survivor Haroutune Aivazian.  He describes the horror his mother faced when a town crier in Marash, a city in Cilcia in South West Anatolia, called for the Armenians of the community to gather in a square just outside of the town for deportation. As his mother prepared for the journey, a local Turkish man warned the family that deportation meant death.
Tuesday, April 28, 2015
100 Days to Inspire Respect In every genocide, in spite of the horror of human killing and the danger that poses, there are remarkable people that come to the fore.  Armin T. Wegner was in the German Sanitary Corps and was posted to Eastern Turkey during WWI.  There he was witness to the genocide of the Armenian people. Seeing the devastating consequences of the deportations he documented the genocide in photographs, keeping meticulous notes at great personal risk.
Tuesday, June 7, 2016
Wednesday, October 25, 2017
Thursday, September 14, 2017
On July 30, 1937 the head of Soviet secret police Nikolai Ezhov signed the order that started a mass punitive operation against their own citizens.
Thursday, November 5, 2015
Jared McBride earned his Ph.D. in History at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he studied ethnic diversity and mass violence in Nazi-occupied Volhynia, Ukraine, during the Second World War. His work specializes in the regions of Russia, Ukraine, and Eastern Europe in the 20th century and research interests include borderland studies, nationalist movements, mass violence and genocide, the Holocaust, inter-ethnic conflict, and war crimes prosecution. Currently, Dr.
Thursday, November 2, 2017
Liberator Thomas D'Aquino describes in this clip his impressions upon entering Dachau. Watch his full-length testimony at vhaonline.usc.edu
Thursday, November 2, 2017
In this short clip, World War II veteran David Pollock talks about the impact that the devastation of the war had on what he wanted to do with his life as a post-war civilian. Watch his full-length testimony on vhaonline.usc.edu
Thursday, November 2, 2017
Liberator Ernest James offers a word of advice to future generations about the importance of personal responsibility, especially the charge of democratic participation. Watch his full-length testimony at vhaonline.usc.edu
Thursday, May 17, 2018
USC Shoah Foundation mourns the death of Sara Shapiro, a Holocaust survivor and mother of board member Mickey Shapiro.
Tuesday, June 19, 2018
Included within the course’s syllabus is the testimony of Holocaust survivor Eva Slonim, who was depicted in an iconic photo of a group of children standing behind the barbed wire at Auschwitz. Slonim composed a poem along with a group of other children while imprisoned in Auschwitz.
Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Professor Richard Hovannisian provides commentary for the testimony clip of Jirair Suchiasian.
Monday, May 20, 2013
This video explores the connection between Constructivist Theory and the principles of teaching with testimony.  It also highlights how testimony encourages active learning, which allows for students to incorporate new information in order to change or reorganize their preexisting thoughts and beliefs.
Friday, February 24, 2017
100 Days to Inspire Respect Paul reflects on his hope that his testimony, and all of the testimonies collected by USC Shoah Foundation, can help teach respect to future generations.
Thursday, August 4, 2016
USC Shoah Foundation, writer Robin Migdol sits down with Kia Hays project manager of New Dimensions in Testimony.
Tuesday, January 19, 2016
The latest, most significant update to the Visual History Archive’s indexing software since 2008 addresses the growing need for a way to index testimonies with more than one survivor.
Tuesday, December 1, 2015
Individuals around the world and throughout the internet share how testimony from the Visual History Archives inspires them to make a difference. #BeginsWithMe
Saturday, October 29, 2016
A new initiative to digitize the invaluable testimony of Holocaust survivors should help permanently preserve this key resource for future generations, say archivists who are leading the effort.
Monday, April 15, 2019
Holocaust Liberator Paul Parks on the futility of hatred and his hope that the testimonies collected by USC Shoah Foundation will help teach future generations respect.
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
USC Shoah Foundation’s Nanjing Massacre testimony collection more than doubled in size last week when USC Shoah Foundation and Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall conducted 18 new interviews with Nanjing Massacre survivors.
Monday, July 27, 2015
The fourth cohort of Teaching with Testimony in the 21st Century in Poland met last week for their initial training on using testimony in their classrooms.
Tuesday, October 13, 2015
Aron Rabinovich describes how he helped guard the "Polizei," who had collaborated with the Nazis, after he was liberated and gave testimony about the crimes they had perpetrated against him and his family.

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