Blog: Through Testimony

Blog Posts by Josh Grossberg

  • June 28, 2016

    At its physical core, USC Shoah Foundation is an impressive bank of computers and programs that bring the testimony of genocide survivors to people around the world.

    It’s a complicated and mysterious process for those who don’t have advanced degrees. But beyond the connections of wires and microchips, there is something far more mysterious and complicated going on: the human connection that takes place between people from different times, different places and different backgrounds when they engage with testimony.

  • August 31, 2015

    Looking into a mirror and making sure her hair looked just so, Yevnigue Salibian didn’t notice me as I was taking her picture. It took a few seconds, but when she finally realized I had documented her act of vanity, she smiled coyly.

  • May 21, 2014

    I look at the picture and realize this is why I’m working at the USC Shoah Foundation. This is what it’s all about. The photo shows two women standing in a field of green grass dotted with dandelions. The younger of the two has her arm wrapped around the other. The older woman smiles at the camera, while the other’s attention is focused only on her friend. The bond between them comes through; the love they share is unmistakable.

  • January 13, 2014

    The email wasn’t so different from many others I’ve received since I started working at the USC Shoah Foundation last summer.

    A woman named Olga in Germany was moved by watching survivor Paula Lebovics talk about her stolen childhood during the Holocaust. Olga had a young daughter of her own and felt an immediate bond with Paula, who was taken to Auschwitz when she was the same age. And so she wanted to contact her.

  • December 8, 2013

    Growing up, it wasn’t terribly unusual to see people in our house with telltale tattoos on their arms.

    We kids somehow knew what those blurry inked numbers meant, but we also knew it wasn’t polite to ask about them. And so, I never did. And honestly, no one in my family had been so marked — the people with tattoos were mostly friends of my grandparents — so it wasn’t something I had a lot of interest in hearing about. And perhaps in an effort to protect our innocence, family elders showed no interest in talking about it.

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Posts are contributed by individual authors. The opinions are solely the authors’ and are not necessarily a reflection of the views of USC Shoah Foundation.

About Josh Grossberg

Sun, 12/08/2013 - 3:06pm -- deanna.pitre

An award-winning writer, Josh Grossberg joined the USC Shoah Foundation as public communications manager in August 2013. Prior to that, Josh was an editor and reporter for several newspapers. He has a bachelor’s degree in journalism with a focus on ethnomusicology.

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