Blog: Through Testimony

Resources for Teaching about the Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda

Thu, 04/07/2016 - 9:16am -- deanna.pitre

Contributor: Lesly Culp

Thu, 04/07/2016 - 9:16am

April 7, 2016 marks the 22nd anniversary of Kwibuka, the official anniversary of the Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda. From April to July 1994, one of the most brutal genocides in human history occurred in Rwanda. It claimed the lives of 800,000 men, women, and children, most of whom were of Tutsi descent.

To help introduce your students to the Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda explore testimonies and activities in IWitness.

First Step Register for IWitness

1. Testimony

Introduce your students to individual experiences through testimony. In IWitness teach with clips of testimony or full length interviews available in IWitness and also the Visual History Archive.
 

Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda

Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda

From April to July 1994, one of the most brutal genocides in human history occurred in Rwanda. It claimed the lives of 800,000 men, women, and children, most of whom were of Tutsi descent. Kwibuka, the official anniversary of the Rwandan Tutsi Genocide, is observed every year on April 7. Explore this selection of testimony clips of survivors and eyewitnesses to the genocide from the Visual History Archive. 

Genocide: Live Wesige on Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda

Language: English

On April 6, 1994, an aircraft carrying Rwandan President Juvénal Habyarimana was shot down by a surface-to-air missile as it was about to land in Kigali airport. Everyone aboard the plane was killed: Habyarimana; president of Burundi, Cyprien Ntaryamira; and a three-man French crew. While it remains unclear who fired the missile, the event is viewed as having ignited the 1994 Rwandan Tutsi Genocide.

Live Wesige remembers hearing the news about the president’s death and describes the violence that ensued in his neighborhood the next day, April 7, 1994.

  • Genocide: Live Wesige on Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda

    Language: English

    On April 6, 1994, an aircraft carrying Rwandan President Juvénal Habyarimana was shot down by a surface-to-air missile as it was about to land in Kigali airport. Everyone aboard the plane was killed: Habyarimana; president of Burundi, Cyprien Ntaryamira; and a three-man French crew. While it remains unclear who fired the missile, the event is viewed as having ignited the 1994 Rwandan Tutsi Genocide.

    Live Wesige remembers hearing the news about the president’s death and describes the violence that ensued in his neighborhood the next day, April 7, 1994.

  • Rose Burizihiza on the Beginning of the Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda

    Language: Kinyarwanda

    Rose Burizihiza describes how the Hutu leaders in her town met to plan how they would kill the local Tutsis.

  • Roméo Dallaire on the 1994 Rwandan Tutsi Genocide

    Language: English

    Roméo Dallaire describes how quickly violence escalated in Rwanda in 1994 and his disappointment in the lack of support from the international community.

  • Valerie Nyirarudodo on forgiveness

    Language: Kinyarwanda

    Valerie Nyirarudodo says she has forgiven the perpetrators of the genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda who have asked for it, and encourages others to follow the same path.

  • Alphonse Kabalisa on anti-Tutsi propaganda

    Language: Kinyarwanda

    Alphonse Kabalisa recalls listening to anti-Tutsi propaganda on the radio with his father, after the death of Rwandan President Juvénal Habyarimana. Alphonse’s testimony is featured in the IWitness activity, Information Quest: The Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda

  • Carl Wilkens on neighbors speaking up

    Language: English

    Carl Wilkens, an aid provider during the Rwandan Tutsi Genocide, describes the courageous acts of his neighbors. 

  • Kizito Kalima on the importance of learning the lesson

    Language: English

    Rwandan Tutsi Genocide survivor Kizito Kalima shares his hope that people take action to prevent future genocides. He vows  to do anything necessary to ensure the world is a safe, peaceful place.

  • Edith Umugiraneza on the Interahamwe Militia

    Language: English

    Rwandan Tutsi Genocide survivor Edith Umugiraneza describes her first contact with the Interahamwe militia, which was threatening violence against Tutsis.

  • Freddy Mutanguha on saying goodbye to his mother

    Language: English

 

2. IWitness Activities

Through multimedia activities centered on testimony students explore themes including propaganda, the bystander effect and the individual experience. Every Friday throughout the month of April, IWitness will publish a new activity geared for Rwandan students. Make sure to log into IWitness to discover the new activities.

The Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda

From April to July 1994, one of the most brutal genocides in human history occurred in Rwanda. It claimed the lives of 800,000 men, women and children, most of whom were of Tutsi descent.
The Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda, as the United Nations Security Council agreed it should be known as in January 2014, shared characteristics with other genocides that came before and after it.

Learning Aims: Through this Information Quest activity, students will learn about the history of the Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda specifically, the history of genocide generally, and the stages of genocide. They will also be introduced to testimony of eyewitnesses who survived.

Bystander Effect

In this Mini Quest activity, students will develop an understanding of what it means to be a bystander and its potential impact in the context of the Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda.

Learning Aims: Students will watch a number of testimonies from witnesses to and survivors of the Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda who describe the consequences of the bystander effect in their own lives. Students will construct a social media message for the #BeginsWithMe campaign that describes their own plan to counter bystander behavior.

How Genocide Starts

From April to July 1994, one of the most brutal genocides in human history occurred in Rwanda. It claimed the lives of 800,000 men, women, and children, most of whom were of Tutsi descent.

Learning Aims: The Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda shared characteristics with other genocides that came before and after it. In this activity, students will learn about the history of genocide and the early stages of genocide. They will also be introduced to the testimonies of eyewitnesses who survived.

Kizito Kalima Information Quest

Information Quests are brief activities designed for students to view and reflect on an experience from a survivor's testimony. Students will watch parts of the testimony of Kizito Kalima, a survivor of the Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda, 1994.  Learning Aims: They will engage with his story and through his story learn about the experience of surviving genocide. 

III. Connection Videos

Available in educator dashboard connection videos provide foundational knowledge required for effective use and learning from content. Use the videos to introduce your students to the Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda.

What is the Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda?

Language: English

To watch the entire connection video register for IWitness. Connection videos are available in the user dashboard.

MORE CLIPS...
 

Learn more about teaching with testimony via our Guidelines for Effective Teaching with Testimony. Discover more IWitness resources for Genocide Awareness Month.

Learn more about teaching with testimony via our Guidelines for Effective Teaching with Testimony - See more at: http://sfi.usc.edu/blog/lesly-culp/five-iwitness-resources-black-history...

 

Through multimedia activities centered on testimony students explore themes including racism, tolerance and resilience.   - See more at: http://sfi.usc.edu/blog/lesly-culp/five-iwitness-resources-black-history...

Posts are contributed by individual authors. The opinions are solely the authors’ and are not necessarily a reflection of the views of USC Shoah Foundation.

About Lesly Culp

Lesly Culp

Lesly Culp is the senior content specialist and trainer for IWitness, USC Shoah Foundation’s educational platform. Culp joined USC Shoah Foundation in 2014 after having worked with the Institute for years as an English teacher at Vista Murrieta High School.

 

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