Meet Jane C. Moore

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 5:00pm -- robin.migdol

Impact in Profile

After learning about IWitness for the first time, social studies teacher Jane C. Moore was inspired to begin using it in her class this year and she even introduced the program to an enthusiastic group of teachers at a professional development seminar this summer.

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Jane C. Moore

After learning about IWitness for the first time, social studies teacher Jane C. Moore was inspired to begin using it in her class this year and she even introduced the program to an enthusiastic group of teachers at a professional development seminar this summer.

Moore teaches sixth grade social studies at East Cobb Middle School in Marietta, Ga. Now in her 21st year of teaching, she said she loves when she finds “really interesting, practical, and relevant ways to teach, like using IWitness.”

Focal Points: Anti-Semitism

Rudolph Abraham

Rudolph Abraham recalls his first encounters with anti-Semitism in the early 1930s in Hungary.

  • Rudolph Abraham

    Rudolph Abraham recalls his first encounters with anti-Semitism in the early 1930s in Hungary.

  • Edith Abrahams

    Edith Abrahams remembers the anti-Semitic attacks and demonstrations in Germany including the burning of Jewish books.

  • Jack Lerner

    Jack Lerner recalls the moments he experienced anti-Semitism in his childhood.

  • Maximilian Kaufmann

    Maximillian Kaufmann speaks about the anti-Semitic propaganda in Austria including newspapers, which drew shrewd caricatures of Jews. He also recalls witnessing the attacks of orthodox Jews on the city streets.

  • Samuel Marcus

    Samuel Marcus reflects on the anti-Semitism he experienced as a child in New York.

  • George Weiss

    George Weiss was seven years old when the Germans invaded his home country of Belgium. He reflects on the shame he felt when he was forced to wear the yellow star of David to school.

  • Renée Firestone on the Importance of Tolerance

    Renée Firestone reflects on the importance of tolerance and hopes that future generations will learn from her testimony, and stand up against prejudice.

  • Judy Lysy Remembers Jewish Restrictions

    Judy Lysy speaks how Jewish restrictions and anti-Semitism increased in her hometown in then Czechoslovakia.

  • Yehudi Lindeman

    Yehudi Lindeman, a child survivor from the Netherlands, speaks of the importance of all people learning from the Holocaust.

  • Erno Abelesz on the German occupation of Hungary

    Erno Abelesz remembers when German forces occupied his home country of Hungary on March 19, 1944.

  • Robert Fisch

    Robert Fisch speaks on the importance of standing up to intolerance and the dangers of being a bystander.

  • Agnes Adachi on the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games

    Agnes Adachi remembers attending the Olympic Games in Berlin 1936; and describes what it was like to watch Jesse Owens compete and win the gold medal. She recalls that the anti-Jewish restrictions and propaganda had been eased at the time because of the international presence in Germany.

  • Norbert Friedman with a Message to the Future

    Norbert Friedman talks about the importance of learning lessons from the Holocaust, which include human compassion for others, tolerance of different religions and respect for human life.

  • Henry Laurant on experiencing anti-Semitism

    Henry Laurant remembers the first time he experienced anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany. He was targeted by other children who were influenced by Nazi rhetoric. His testimony is featured in the multimedia professional development program, Echoes and Reflections.

  • Leo Bach with a message to the future

    Leo Bach explains how humanity has a responsibility to stop atrocities like the Holocaust from happening again.

Monthly Institute Visit: RSVP to Attend

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 12:23pm -- deanna.pitre

Summary:

Free and open to the public, monthly Institute visits give guests a chance to explore the life stories of survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust and other genocides and to discover how their memories are being used to overcome prejudice, intolerance and bigotry.

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