The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research invites proposals for its 2017-2018 International Teaching Fellowship that will provide support for university and college faculty to integrate testimonies from the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive (VHA) into new or existing courses. This fellowship is only available to faculty at universities and colleges that subscribe to the VHA, either directly or through ProQuest.
/ Wednesday, February 1, 2017
The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research and the International Institute for Holocaust Research, Yad Vashem wish to announce the third joint workshop for advanced PhD candidates working on Holocaust topics.
/ Tuesday, January 31, 2017
At a first glance The Yellow Spot: The Extermination of the Jews in Germany is a book about the Holocaust. But in fact, it was published in 1936, after just three years of Nazi rule — and a full five years before the first gas chambers were commissioned for the murder of European Jewry. The authors spend 287 pages detailing a series of laws and actions taken against the Jews. Their conclusion was that the “legal disability” being imposed by the Nazis upon the Jews ultimately would result in their elimination. (Originally published by The Hollywood Reporter.)
/ Tuesday, January 31, 2017
A group of over a dozen educators representing the so-called Visegrad countries – a bloc of Central European countries including the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia – met for a second time to experience and discuss the power of the IWalks and IWitness activities developed by USC Shoah Foundation.
/ Monday, January 30, 2017
Students will explore racism through close reading of testimony, they will learn how racism is promoted through the idea of Us v. Them and they will learn about the power of protest and identifying ways to counter racism, equipping students with the knowledge, skills and capacities to create positive change and inspire respect.
/ Friday, January 27, 2017
New Dimensions in Testimony will be on display at Holocaust Museum Houston until May 30 as part of the museum’s artistic exhibit “A Celebration of Survival.”
/ Thursday, January 26, 2017
The Holocaust is inarguably the most heinous crime against a group of people we have seen in modern times. Despite decades of wrestling with how such an atrocity could have occurred and the postwar generation promising never again, history keeps repeating itself. Therefore, the collection and the custody of testimonies from those who bear witness remains a necessary task for as long as inhumanities keep occurring. Genocide and crimes against humanity transcend religions, cultures, languages, geographic regions, socioeconomics, gender, age, etc., making testimony collection across all cultures not only a moral responsibility, but imperative given the mission of USC Shoah Foundation. We know for sure that under a certain set of circumstances, genocide could happen anywhere, and again.
/ Thursday, January 26, 2017
Three hundred and ninety-six testimonies were added to the Visual History Archive as part of the archive’s latest update on January 23, including new collections and features.
/ Wednesday, January 25, 2017
As an educator you might be thinking how to get started with the IWitness Video Challenge. How do you encourage your students to make a difference? How do you incorporate video editing? Well, we have the answers to these questions from actual IWitness educators.
/ Wednesday, January 25, 2017
On Monday, faculty were invited to participate in three workshops in USC Shoah Foundation’s office in Leavey Library as part of Diversity and Inclusion week activities.
/ Tuesday, January 24, 2017

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