When it comes to implementing Nazi Germany’s Final Solution, few places were more successful than Nazi-occupied Lithuania. More than 90 percent of the country’s wartime Jewish population of 250,000 was murdered in the Holocaust.
/ Friday, June 14, 2019
The news about a group of teenagers throwing a Nazi salute at a party in Orange County is a startling reminder that knowledge of the Holocaust is fading. Here are four free online classroom-ready activities on IWitness that address the topics of antisemitism, bystanders and hatred.
Nazi salutes, swastikas, IWitness Spotlight / Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Instead of factories of death, these black-and-white stills convey the idea that soldiers are happy and prisoners are mere criminals serving a sentence. A research fellow with USC Shoah Foundation’s Center for Advanced Genocide Research discussed his findings on this topic in a lecture.
Greenberg Research Fellow, Lukas Meisel, Nazi photographs / Tuesday, February 26, 2019
Hannah Lessing represents Austrian society’s desire to atone. Her unique job involves, among other things, tracking down Austrian Holocaust survivors or their kin – inside the country and out – to offer financial reparations. Lessing, the secretary general of the National Fund of the Republic of Austria for Victims of National Socialism, came to USC Shoah Foundation this week to discuss a potential collaborative project with the Institute.
antiSemitism, reparations, Austria / Friday, March 22, 2019
  “SS-Photographs from Concentration Camps. Perpetrator Sources and Counter-Narratives” Lukas Meissel (Ph.D. Candidate in Holocaust Studies, University of Haifa) 2018-2019 Margee and Douglas Greenberg Research Fellow February 12, 2019  
cagr / Tuesday, February 26, 2019
USC Shoah Foundation is saddened by the recent loss of Eva Kor, a Holocaust survivor who – along with her twin sister – endured cruel experiments conducted on her at Auschwitz, and, half a century later, sparked controversy by publicly forgiving the Nazis who tormented her and killed her parents and two older sisters. She went on to found CANDLES Museum and Education Center in Indiana.
DiT / Monday, July 8, 2019
About a month before the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939, sparking World War II, a desperate Jewish father in Germany penned a letter in broken English to a friend in England, Mrs. Wolf.  “I beg to inform you that we have got a refuse from the Aid Committee in London, owing to our high waiting number for America. … We are very discouraged by this answer and are now forced to get out our children as quick as possible.” Alfons Lasker, an attorney in Breslau, was on a mission to get his two daughters – Anita and Renate – out of Germany. He did not succeed.
Anita Lasker-Wallfisch, kristallnacht / Tuesday, December 17, 2019
Professor Marion Kaplan, world-renowned scholar of German-Jewish history, will serve as the 2018-2019 Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar in Residence at the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research after being awarded its most esteemed fellowship. Professor Kaplan will deliver a public lecture and spend one week in residence at the Center this Spring.
cagr / Friday, January 25, 2019
In the 1980s, a tiny woman in her 50s named Ruth Westheimer shocked and delighted the world with her blunt advice – delivered in a grandmotherly German accent – about sex. She became a media sensation and remains a household name as “Dr. Ruth.” Less known is her perilous journey to get there – a story that includes her survival of the Holocaust and immigration to British-controlled Mandatory Palestine, where she briefly became a sniper in a Jewish paramilitary force.
/ Wednesday, May 22, 2019
The Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum this month became the second in the world to install a permanent theater to display Dimensions in Testimony – an interactive, holographic project developed by USC Shoah Foundation that will allow visitors to interact with a Holocaust survivor long after they are no longer with us.
DiT, dallas, museum, Max Glauben / Sunday, October 6, 2019
Early this year, when the Swedish History Museum opened its exhibit about the Holocaust – an exhibit that includes USC Shoah Foundation testimonies and some of its interactive biographies – it marked the state-funded museum’s first foray into the topic. The exhibit has been a major success, say two Swedish museum professionals who played a prominent role in the installation, and who came to USC Shoah Foundation’s headquarters in Los Angeles last week to discuss taking the partnership to the next level.
DiT, museum, Swedish History Museum / Wednesday, September 11, 2019
Max Glauben was 13 when his family’s apartment was destroyed in the historic battle of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. Eva Kuper was 2 when her mother’s cousin rescued her from a train in the frantic moments before it headed to the Treblinka death camp. Both lost parents and other relatives in the Holocaust. And both are among the four Holocaust survivors whose testimonies USC Shoah Foundation is recording this week using cutting-edge, 360-degree filming techniques at the physical locations of their pre-war and wartime experiences, as well as their places of liberation.
360 testimony / Wednesday, May 15, 2019
This clip reel features several Holocaust survivors talking about the antisemitism they experienced in relation to the sports they played during the Nazi era in Germany.
/ Wednesday, October 2, 2019
Professor Marion Kaplan, 2018-2019 Sara and Asa Shapiro Scholar in Residence at the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research, gave the annual Shapiro Scholar public lecture on gender and the Holocaust.
cagr / Wednesday, May 1, 2019
USC Shoah Foundation is saddened by the recent loss of Walter P. Loebenberg, a friend of the Institute and a Holocaust survivor who, after finding refuge in the United States, went on to open the Florida Holocaust Museum, one of the largest Holocaust museums in the nation. He was 94.
Walter Loebenberg, obit, Florida Holocaust Museum / Monday, February 4, 2019
USC Shoah Foundation joined a Friday ceremony at a classroom in Cottbus, Germany that contributed 100 butterflies to the Butterfly Project, an international effort by schoolchildren to paint 1.5 million ceramic butterflies – one for every child murdered in the Holocaust.
The Butterfly Project, Steven Schindler, Max Schindler, Cottbus / Friday, January 25, 2019
On January 25, 2019, the fifth- and sixth-graders of a school in Cottbus, Germany honored all those affected during the Holocaust by unveiling a Butterfly Project memorial to the 1.5 million children murdered during this dark moment in history. This first-ever initiative in Germany introduced a new, younger audience to real stories of local children.
op-eds / Wednesday, February 13, 2019
Painter David Kassan has sat with survivors of the Holocaust for countless hours during the past five years, carefully listening to their stories of pain, grief, resilience and quiet victory.
David Kassan, art, exhibit, fisher / Tuesday, September 17, 2019
Survivors and their testimonies have been central to Holocaust research and memorial culture. Even before the end of the Shoah, survivor historians in parts of Eastern Europe liberated from Nazi occupation collected testimonies and conducted interviews with fellow survivors.
cagr, cfp / Friday, September 6, 2019
The story of Leon Bass, who took part in the liberation of Nazi concentration camps only to later face discrimination in the United States, inspires a group of dormitory RAs at the Massachusetts campus to share their own experiences of feeling excluded.
Worcester State University, Manasseh Konadu, IDC, intercollegiate diversity congress / Monday, February 25, 2019
“Who Will Write Our History” tells how ghetto inhabitant Emanuel Ringelblum, a historian, spearheaded an effort to collect what became one of the most important caches of eyewitness accounts to survive World War II. USC Shoah Foundation is a screening-event partner.
Who Will Write Our History, Emanuel Ringelblum, unesco / Tuesday, January 22, 2019
USC Shoah Foundation Director of Strategy, Partnership and Media Andi Gitow will join a panel discussion and show selected clips of the film, Who Will Write Our History, at 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, at the Paley Center for Media in Los Angeles. Joining Gitow will be writer, director and producer Roberta Grossman; Executive Producer Nancy Spielberg; and Holocaust survivor Natalie Gold.
/ Tuesday, February 5, 2019
On the occasion of the commemoration of Kristallnacht, Anita Lasker-Wallfisch, Holocaust survivor and gifted cellist, along with her children Raphael and Maya, grandson Abraham and niece Michal, will offer an intimate glimpse inside their family history. Letters from the family archive, photographs and musical pieces tell the story of her love-filled childhood home in Breslau, the Nazis seizure of power and the subsequent fate of her family.
/ Wednesday, October 30, 2019
Coinciding with the 25th anniversary and recent rerelease of “Schindler’s List,” USC Shoah Foundation has produced a suite of learning activities connected to the film. The engaging activities encourage critical thinking; all feature clips of testimony from Holocaust survivors who were saved by Oskar Schindler.
IWitness Spotlight, Schindler's List / Thursday, January 3, 2019
We are saddened to hear of the recent passing of Jack Welner, who survived a Jewish ghetto in Poland, a labor camp near the Dachau concentration camp in Germany, and the Auschwitz Nazi death camp in Poland – where his mother was murdered on arrival – before immigrating to Denver, Colorado, where he began a new life. He was 98. When Welner gave his testimony to USC Shoah Foundation in 1995, it changed his life.
/ Friday, September 27, 2019
The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research is proud to announce the publication of a new book entitled New Perspectives on Kristallnacht: After 80 Years, the Nazi Pogrom in Global Comparison, edited by Wolf Gruner and Steve Ross.
kristallnacht, conference, cagr2018, cagr / Saturday, November 30, 2019
Public lecture by Gabór Tóth (University of Oxford, History) 2018-2019 Center Postdoctoral Research Fellow
cagr / Monday, January 7, 2019
At UNESCO’s Paris headquarters on Jan. 27, USC Shoah Foundation Finci-Viterbi Executive Director Stephen Smith will host a panel discussion following a screening of “Who Will Write Our History,” a documentary by Director Roberta Grossman and Executive Producer Nancy Spielberg that chronicles a covert effort by a group of resistance fighters in the Warsaw Ghetto who amassed an archive of documents that would later shed light on the Nazi atrocities that occurred there.
Who Will Write Our History, screening, panel, unesco, Stephen Smith / Tuesday, January 22, 2019
USC Shoah Foundation, Blavatnik Archive partner on adding soldiers’ narratives to searchable database. The project expands focus on veterans discussing their daily lives, Jewish experience before and during WWII.
interdisciplinary research week, soviet army, russia, Summer Research Fellowship for USC Faculty, Beth and Arthur Lev Student Research Fellowship / Friday, April 19, 2019
Miriam Katin survived the Holocaust as a toddler because her quick-thinking mother faked their deaths in Budapest at a historically perilous time for Jews in Hungary. Now 77, Katin has a thriving career as a graphic artist whose humor cartoons have appeared in The New Yorker. Her remarkable oral history would have been lost to time without the initiative by USC Shoah Foundation to document the stories of Holocaust survivors before it is too late.
collections, last chance testimony, lcti / Wednesday, July 31, 2019

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