A team of eight staff members from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Levine Institute for Holocaust Education is responsible for bringing the Some Were Neighbors IWitness activity to life.
/ Tuesday, September 8, 2015
A panel discussion with Verena Buser, PhD (Alice Salomon University); Martin Dean, PhD (United States Holocaust Memorial Museum); Andrea Rudorff, PhD (Institut für Zeitgeschichte); and Sari J. Siegel, Doctoral Candidate (University of Southern California). 
presentation, lecture, discussion, concentration camps / Tuesday, November 22, 2016
As the Allies retook control of lands that had been occupied by the Germans, they came across many Nazi camps. In some instances, the Nazis had tried to destroy all evidence of the camps, in order to conceal from the world what had happened there. In other cases, only the buildings remained as the Nazis had sent the prisoners elsewhere, often on death marches.
/ Tuesday, April 30, 2013
It’s hard to imagine I’m even typing this sentence, but an avowed Holocaust denier is the official Republican nominee for an upcoming congressional election in Illinois, while a man whose website warns of a “Jewish supremacy” is running in California.
op-eds, antiSemitism / Monday, July 9, 2018
USC Shoah foundation is saddened to learn of the recent passing of Anneliese Nossbaum, who survived a Jewish ghetto and three concentration camps. Anneliese passed away March 23, 2020 after falling ill within weeks of returning from a trip that commemorated the 75-year anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. She was 91. She was born on January 8, 1929 in Guben, Germany as Anneliese Winterberg.  At the age of two, her family moved to Bonn where her father later became the rabbi of their synagogue.  
obit, holocaust / Wednesday, April 1, 2020
June 18 saw the U.S. premiere of a set of piano variations on a Polish patriotic theme composed in the Dachau concentration camp by prisoner of war Leon Kaczmarek (1903–1973). Kaczmarek’s composition was performed by 17-year-old pianist Nicholas Biniaz-Harris, winner of the National Symphony Orchestra’s 2013 Young Soloists’ Competition.
music, performance, kaczmarek, biniaz, dachau / Tuesday, June 25, 2013
USC Shoah Foundation is announcing the release of Lala, a virtual reality film and educational resource that tells the true story of a dog that brightened the lives of a family interned by the Nazis in a ghetto in Poland during the Holocaust.
iwitness, lala, virtual reality / Monday, October 2, 2017
“Holocaust and Ethnic Cleansing in the North Caucasus, 1942-43” Lecture by Crispin Brooks (USC Shoah Foundation) Crispin Brooks, curator of USC Shoah Foundation's Visual History Archive, will present a paper that examines the parallels of Nazi and Soviet Mass Violence in the Karachai autonomous region, 1942-43. Sponsored by Shapell-Guerin Chair in Jewish Studies. USC Social Science Building, Room 250 Contact: vhi-academic@dornsife.usc.edu
/ Monday, October 14, 2013
USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research welcomed the University of Munich’s Maximilian Strnad to USC last week.
cagr, visiting scholar, lecture / Monday, November 23, 2015
William (“Bill”) Harvey, a friend of the institute who survived two Nazi concentration camps, later became a well-known cosmetologist with a client list that included Judy Garland, Zsa Zsa Gabor, and a young Liza Minnelli.
/ Tuesday, April 5, 2022
The need for continued memorialization of the fate of the Roma and Sinti population of Europe has never been more important.
Roma Sinti / Tuesday, August 1, 2017
Instead of factories of death, these black-and-white stills convey the idea that soldiers are happy and prisoners are mere criminals serving a sentence. A research fellow with USC Shoah Foundation’s Center for Advanced Genocide Research discussed his findings on this topic in a lecture.
Greenberg Research Fellow, Lukas Meisel, Nazi photographs / Tuesday, February 26, 2019
Hannah Lessing represents Austrian society’s desire to atone. Her unique job involves, among other things, tracking down Austrian Holocaust survivors or their kin – inside the country and out – to offer financial reparations. Lessing, the secretary general of the National Fund of the Republic of Austria for Victims of National Socialism, came to USC Shoah Foundation this week to discuss a potential collaborative project with the Institute.
antiSemitism, reparations, Austria / Friday, March 22, 2019
  “SS-Photographs from Concentration Camps. Perpetrator Sources and Counter-Narratives” Lukas Meissel (Ph.D. Candidate in Holocaust Studies, University of Haifa) 2018-2019 Margee and Douglas Greenberg Research Fellow February 12, 2019  
cagr / Tuesday, February 26, 2019
Though USC Shoah Foundation specializes in maintaining thousands of recorded testimonies in its Visual History Archive, many of the Institute’s interviewees have also published memoirs and autobiographies.
op-eds / Thursday, October 19, 2017
United Nations, USC Shoah Foundation Institute, and Yad Vashem to release new educational resource.
/ Monday, January 24, 2011
Colin is thought to have the distinction of being the first survivor to speak on camera, just after liberation from Bergen-Belsen, which happened to be her 22nd birthday.
/ Friday, April 14, 2017
An online lecture by Wolf Gruner (Founding Director, USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research) Organized by the Johannesburg Holocaust & Genocide Centre and The Base Cosponsored by the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research
cagr / Friday, February 5, 2021
In her public lecture on Feb. 9, 2017, at USC, Robert J. Katz Research Fellow Teresa Walch outlines the process by which Jews in Berlin lost their rights, access to public spaces, ability to move freely, and finally their own homes, from 1933-38. Throughout her talk, Walch refers to the testimonies in the Visual History Archive that she has discovered of Holocaust survivors who describe living through this period and its effect on them.
presentation, fellow, cagr, lecture, katz / Monday, February 27, 2017
When I visited Nazi death camps in 2014, I viewed spaces filled with the spirits of so many lives lost and witnessed the end result of evil, intolerance, and hatred. I left the gas chambers at Auschwitz and Majdanek that summer thinking that the sick, twisted ideology that drove the Nazis and was fueled by hatred and ignorance no longer existed in the 21st Century, especially in the United States. I naively believed Nazi ideology had ceased to exist with the end of World War II and the Holocaust.
op-eds / Thursday, August 17, 2017
Bawnik survived a Jewish ghetto and four concentration camps, only to nearly die on one of the last days of the war, when British warplanes bombed a German ocean liner that he and thousands of other Jewish prisoners had been forced to board.
Henry Bawnik, obit, Cap Arcona / Thursday, September 13, 2018
When Elizabeth Holtzman of New York became the youngest woman in American history elected to Congress at age 31, she hadn’t spent much time thinking about Nazi war criminals. But when a whistleblower in 1973 brought to her attention the fact that such perpetrators were living in the United States with full knowledge of the federal government, she decided to use the power of her office to do something about it.
Elizabeth Holtzman / Friday, January 5, 2018
UCLA’s Center for Near Eastern Studies will host Wolf Gruner and other Holocaust and genocide scholars in a panel discussion Thurs., Feb. 12.
cagr, wolf gruner, ucla / Tuesday, February 10, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation’s project to record testimonies of Jews who experienced persecution while living in the Middle East and Africa during the Holocaust will be a topic of discussion at the "Jews of the Middle East in the Shadow of the Holocaust" conference Jerusalem on April 5, 2016.
name, jacqueline gmach / Wednesday, March 23, 2016
During her month in residence at USC Shoah Foundation, Walch will research the exclusion of German Jews from their own homeland during the Holocaust through Nazi policies restricting Jewish spaces and architecture.
bob katz, cagr, fellowship / Thursday, May 19, 2016
On the day that Faye Schulman’s parents and siblings were killed, along with almost all the Jews of her Eastern Polish town of Lenin, Schulman (then Faigel Lazebnik) was pulled aside by a Nazi officer. The Nazi official had been to Schulman’s studio a few weeks previously. After invading the town in 1942, the Nazis had ordered the talented young photographer to take photographs—both to document their activities in the town and to provide their officers with vanity portraits. Schulman remembered the photo session with the Nazi who now pulled her aside.
/ Friday, June 4, 2021
Despite the testimony of many witnesses to his Nazi-era crimes, Walther Becker walked out of a German courtroom a free man. The judge in the case – who was later revealed to have his own Nazi sympathies – gave little credence to survivor testimony when he handed down his 1972 verdict.
christopher browning, mickey shapiro, GAM / Thursday, March 29, 2018
Today we mourn the loss of Hanna Pankowsky, a remarkable woman who gave us her testimony and was one of the subjects in a portrait series of Holocaust survivors painted by David Kassan.
In memory, in memoriam, David Kassan / Thursday, January 23, 2020
All over the world, Jewish survivors of the Holocaust era are giving testimony – but not for USC Shoah Foundation’s original collection of over 51,000 Holocaust survivor testimonies. Instead, they are the first participants of the new Testimonies of North Africa and the Middle East project.
Africa, testimony / Friday, April 11, 2014

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