Lukas Meissel, a PhD candidate in Holocaust Studies at the University of Haifa, Israel, has been awarded the 2018-2019 Greenberg Research Fellowship at the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research. Meissel will be in residence at the Center for one month in early Spring 2019 to conduct research in the Visual History Archive for his doctoral dissertation, entitled “SS-Photography in Concentration Camps. Genres and Meanings of Erkennungsdienst-Photos.”
cagr / Saturday, August 4, 2018
In 2017, Mr. Feingold recorded a more than 4 hour testimony with USC Shoah Foundation as part of the Last Chance Testimony Collection, enabling Holocaust survivors to share their stories for USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive—before it is too late—where they will exist in perpetuity.
holocaust, last chance testimony, lcti / Thursday, May 7, 2020
USC Shoah Foundation mourns the passing of Holocaust survivor and accomplished structural engineer Sigmund Burke, who died February 6, 2022 at nearly 98 years old. He recorded his testimony with USC Shoah Foundation in 2019, at the age of 95, as part of the Last Chance Testimony Collection initiative, USC Shoah Foundation’s race-against-time effort to record the stories and perspectives of the last remaining Holocaust survivors.
in memoriam / Tuesday, March 15, 2022
When Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas made the claim that Jews were targeted in the Holocaust for their “social function” in banking and not for their religion, he was not ranting from the podium or calling for death to the Jews. His approach was much more subtle, and therefore much more sinister.
Mahmoud Abbas, palestine, Israel, anti-semitism, op-eds, antiSemitism / Tuesday, May 8, 2018
“Challenging the Shame Paradigm: Jewish Women’s Narratives of Sexual(ized) Violence During the Holocaust” Lauren Cantillon (PhD candidate in the Department of Culture, Media & Creative Industries at King’s College London, UK) 2020-2021 Robert J. Katz Research Fellow in Genocide Studies March 25, 2021
cagr / Friday, April 9, 2021
USC Shoah Foundation is saddened to learn of the passing of Holocaust survivor Curt Lowens, a wartime hero who became a well-known character actor when he moved to the United States. He was 91. Born Curt Lowenstein on Nov. 17, 1925 in Germany, Lowen and his family had planned to emigrate to the United States as World War II was starting, but they were stopped from leaving the Netherlands when the Germans invaded that country. He was briefly deported to the Westerbork concentration camp in 1943, but he was released because of his father’s business connections.
/ Thursday, May 11, 2017
My recent stay at the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my academic career.  From the remarkable power and content of the Visual History Archive, to the welcoming and helpful nature of the staff and donor community, I leave my term as the Breslauer, Rutman, and Anderson Research Fellow strengthened by new friendships and enriched by new findings for my work. 
cagr, op-eds / Wednesday, November 11, 2020
One of the members of the 2014 Teaching with Testimony in the 21st Century cohort in Hungary didn’t have any need for new lesson plans for his students, and in fact he didn’t even have a first day of school to prepare for: he’s retired. But he didn’t let that stop him from learning about how testimony can be used to teach students about genocide and tolerance.
/ Tuesday, September 22, 2015
Steven Spielberg, founder of USC Shoah Foundation and director and co-producer of the film, says there has never been a more important time for students to see the historical period drama. “Hate is less parenthetical today, and it’s more a headline," he told Lester Holt of NBC Nightly News in an interview about the rerelease.
Schindler's List, educational screenings, students, Steven Spielberg, Lester Holt, education / Wednesday, December 5, 2018
Program by Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, USC Shoah Foundation and World Jewish Congress in partnership with Discovery Education
a70 / Friday, December 5, 2014
Ten years ago, Sanne van Heijst was working on developing teaching materials at the museum of Konzentrationslager Herzogenbusch, or Vught, a former concentration camp in the Netherlands. Van Heijst was looking for a way to get through to the students who would visit the museum.“I was looking for a common thread that would help pupils to make a connection between the different groups of prisoners from the camp and the different events that happened,” she said.
/ Thursday, March 24, 2016
Music is the purest form of communication. It transcends language and ignores the passage of time. It can be euphoric and elegiac, subtle and sublime. It joyously welcomes life and mournfully greets death. It can provide glimmers of hope and comfort in a world devoid of hope and comfort.
days of remembrance, comcast, Xfinity, op-eds / Wednesday, April 15, 2015
Watch Judith Goldstein’s full testimony from the Visual History Archive as part of Comcast’s Days of Remembrance: PastFORWARD broadcast April 15-June 1, 2015. From her childhood in Vilna, Poland, to her adult life in the United States, the arts have rarely been very far from Judith Goldstein.
/ Friday, May 22, 2015
Longtime USC Shoah Foundation Executive Committee and Board of Councilors member Mickey Shapiro has provided a major endowed gift to create an inaugural academic chair at the Institute that will be dedicated to deepening the study of the impact of Holocaust education.
research / Monday, November 29, 2021
Resources this week engage students to think about the experiences of women in a variety of contexts.
100 days to inspire respect / Friday, March 3, 2017
Dimensions in Testimony highlights “Speaking Memories,” an exhibit by the organization Jewish Culture in Sweden featuring the voices and stories of Holocaust survivors. The Swedish History Museum also launched access to the 55,000 testimonies in the Institute’s Visual History Archive.
Swedish History Museum, Speaking Memories, Dimensions in Testimony, DiT, Sidney Shachnow / Thursday, January 24, 2019
USC Shoah Foundation and the Museum of Jewish Heritage are joining forces on July 12 to host the official New York City premiere of My Name Is Sara, a feature film based on the true story of a young girl’s survival during the Holocaust while hiding in plain sight in the Ukrainian countryside. Produced in association with USC Shoah Foundation, the film was an Official Selection at over 50 festivals internationally, taking home five Best Feature Awards. Strand Releasing will bring the movie to New York theatres on July 13, 2022 and nationwide beginning July 22, 2022.
/ Friday, July 8, 2022
Paul Engel est né le 4 mai 1922 à Vienne (Autriche) dans une famille juive de la classe moyenne. Il a un jeune frère, Robert. Lorsque la Première Guerre mondiale éclate en 1914, son père, Eduard, est mobilisé dans l’armée austro-hongroise. Fait prisonnier de guerre, celui-ci passe six ans en Sibérie à travailler dans une mine de charbon, avant de retrouver sa famille en 1920. À Vienne, Eduard possède une magasin de parfums en gros. Avant la guerre, Paul fréquente une école primaire et entre au lycée du 14ème district de Vienne.
/ Sunday, January 26, 2014
As part of USC Shoah Foundation's commemoration of the liberation of Auschwitz, IWitness has just published three new Information Quest activities featuring child survivors of Auschwitz-Birkenau—Paula Lebovics, Eva Slonim, and Eva Kor.
past is present, Auschwitz70 / Monday, February 9, 2015
We are sad to learn of the passing of Thomas Blatt, a Holocaust survivor who was one of the few people to survive an escape from the Sobibor death camp in 1943. He was 88.Born April 15, 1927, in Lublin, Poland, Blatt also served as a witness at the 2009 trial of the camp guard John Demjanjuk.
/ Monday, November 2, 2015
As a clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst, Sarah Sternklar, PhD, recognizes the powerful healing effects of words - how important and therapeutic it can be for people to tell their story. "This is a wonderful benefit for the survivors."
/ Friday, October 16, 2020
We are sad to learn of the passing of Thomas Blatt, a Holocaust survivor who was one of the few people to survive an escape from the Sobibor death camp in 1943. He was 88. Born April 15, 1927, in Lublin, Poland, Blatt also served as a witness at the 2009 trial of the camp guard John Demjanjuk.
in memoriam / Thursday, November 5, 2015
As the first anniversary of my life-changing trip to Poland is upon me, I take time to reflect on the impact that trip has made on me both personally and professionally.  I have learned so much from my experiences as a teacher in USC Shoah Foundation’s and Discovery Education’s Auschwitz: The Past is Present program.
Auschwitz70, reflection, op-eds / Wednesday, January 27, 2016
Check out our year in review of the Institute's work in 2018, including stories about our new collection of testimonies from survivors of anti-Rohingya violence and the work we have done with the United Nations.
/ Thursday, December 20, 2018
The Aladdin Project, founded by Anne-Marie Revcolevschi, uses the power of words to create bonds between Jewish and Muslim worlds. This article first appeared in the Spring 2014 issue of PastForward.
pastforward / Wednesday, September 17, 2014
USC Shoah Foundation mourns the loss of the Holocaust survivor and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, who passed away on April 3, 2022. She was 97.
/ Tuesday, April 5, 2022
Jennifer Goss designed the new IWitness Information Quest activity about Kristallnacht to teach students about the complexities of one of the most important turning points of the Holocaust.
/ Thursday, October 31, 2013
The new multimedia Ukrainian teacher’s guide Where Do Human Rights Begin: Lessons of History and Contemporary Approaches is now available as an online resource on the USC Shoah Foundation website.
Ukraine, human rights education / Tuesday, April 1, 2014
If you’ve ever liked a Facebook post or replied to a tweet from the USC Shoah Foundation, you’ve met Deanna Pitre – at least virtually.
/ Friday, July 25, 2014
Growing up, David Cook heard tales of his grandfather’s time in the service during World War II ­-- particularly how he had helped liberate Buchenwald, a Nazi concentration camp in Germany.Though his grandfather passed away in 2001, this past semester, Cook had the opportunity to dive deeper into his story and World War II in his “History of the Holocaust” course taught by Professor Adam R. Seipp, USC Shoah Foundation’s first-ever Texas A&M Teaching Fellow.
/ Friday, April 15, 2016

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