Auschwitz was one of five death camps established by the Nazis in Poland where Jews were taken to be murdered during the so-called “Final Solution,” a euphemism for the their genocide. We know it through the horrific photos of trains filled with Jews, of men being split from women, parents from children, of the uniformed Nazi wagging his finger, and of the brick chimneys billowing smoke. But there is a much more intimate story still to be heard.

/ Tuesday, January 27, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation spent seven months researching the identities of every child in the liberation photo of the children behind the barbed wire, and reunited four of them yesterday in Krakow.
/ Tuesday, January 27, 2015
The sense of history in the making was palpable Monday in Krakow, Poland, where more than 20 staff members of USC Shoah Foundation — The Institute for Visual History and Education attended a reception to honor more than 100 Auschwitz survivors on the eve of the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the death camp.
/ Tuesday, January 27, 2015
USC Shoah Foundation spent seven months researching the identities of every child in the liberation photo of the children behind the barbed wire, and reunited four of them January 26, 2015, in Krakow.
/ Tuesday, January 27, 2015
As the number of Holocaust survivors dwindles, it falls to future generations to ensure their stories remain vibrant and strong.
/ Monday, January 26, 2015
The Kizito Kalima Information Quest in IWitness introduces students to the Rwandan Tutsi Genocide and the story of Kizito Kalima, one of its survivors.
/ Thursday, January 22, 2015

Anita Lasker-Wallfisch had a lucky moment while being processed at the Sauna in Auschwitz-Birkenau.  One of the girls processing her asked her what she did prior to landing in that place of unspeakable horror. “I played the cello,” she answered. That surreal conversation, not far from the gas chambers at Birkenau, would save her life.  As a member of the Auschwitz women's orchestra, playing the cello meant respite from heavy labor.  

/ Wednesday, January 21, 2015

USC Shoah Foundation will once again offer USC students the opportunity to study post-genocide reconstruction in Rwanda this summer on the annual “Rebuilding Rwanda:  Memory, Testimony, and Living Together After Genocide” course at USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

/ Tuesday, January 20, 2015
Seventy years after the camp was liberated, institute helps bring survivors, teachers and others to milestone event.
/ Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Auschwitz should never have existed, so why are we so keen to cling onto it? Would it not be reasonable to scrub it from the landscape, remove the very thought of what it represents from our minds, recognize it as the cemetery it is, then grass it over and leave the dead to rest in peace?  

/ Monday, January 19, 2015

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